The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Food compost.
Flickr Photo/szczel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Karen May, program manager of King County's Food: Too Good To Waste program, about food waste. 

Wikimedia Commons

Ross Reynolds talks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for the Seattle Times, about the legacy of the Battle in Seattle.

Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the fate of Initiative 1351, the class size measure passed by voters earlier this month.

Facebook Photo/Fight Fistula

Ross Reynolds interviews Carolyn Anderman, director of international programs for One By One, a Seattle-based group helping women in Africa recover from a devastating birth complication called obstetric fistula.  Affected women are often shunned in their communities for a condition that can be fixed with a $500 operation.

Poet Heather McHugh.
Courtesy of the University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle poet Heather McHugh, who is the author of eight volumes of poetry and numerous works of translation. She won a  MacArthur Fellowship, the so-called genius award, in 2009. Since her retirement as a professor of creative writing at the University of Washington this year, she has been working full time on a non-profit organization called Caregifted, which provides relief for family caregivers of  severely disabled people.

A volunteer for the iconic Salvation Army Christmas bell ringing campaign.
Flickr Photo/Sage Ross (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Liahann Bannerman, director of the volunteer center at United Way of King County, about where people can volunteer this Thanksgiving, and how volunteers dry up after the holidays.

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

    

Marcie Sillman speaks with Joshua Plotnik, founder and CEO of Think Elephants International, about the debate over where to send Bamboo and Chai, Woodland Park Zoo's remaining two Asian elephants. The zoo announced Wednesday that they've decided to phase out their elephant program. 

photo courtesy Pacific Northwest Ballet

When Kent Stowell and his wife, Francia Russell, took over artistic leadership at Pacific Northwest Ballet more than 30 years ago they wanted to build the tiny regional dance company into a national ballet powerhouse. To help them reach that goal, they decided to create a signature holiday production at PNB, a ballet that would distinguish them from all the other American ballet companies.

The logical choice was a new adaptation of "Nutcracker," the story of a young girl who's given a nutcracker doll that magically comes to life. Different versions of this Christmas story are performed across the country.

The theater revised its number of seats down from 798 to 570. The seats are leather and offer enough leg room for an average size adult woman to fully extend her legs (claim tested).
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

The Cinerama, a property managed by Paul Allen's Vulcan Real Estate, has reopened after an extensive, top-of-the-line renovation. Marcie Sillman speaks with Jennifer Bean, director of the cinema and media studies program at the University of Washington, about the history of Seattle's Cinerama, and the ways that movie theaters lure moviegoers into their seats.

Washington State Auctions Picasso Sketchbook

Nov 20, 2014
Drawings from inside the Picasso sketchbook.
Courtesy of James G. Murphy Co.

Marcie Sillman talks with Chiyo Ishikawa, deputy director for art and curator of European painting and sculpture at the Seattle Art Museum, about the state revenue department's auctioning of a sketchbook dated 1912 that contains 27 drawings thought to be the work of Pablo Picasso. 
Flickr Photo/European Parliament (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Washington professor Sapna Cheryan about how the nerd stereotype is keeping women away from the field of computer science.

This segment originally aired June 2, 2014.

A scene from "All the Way," a play about President Lyndon B. Johnson by Seattle playwright Robert Schenkkan.
Seattle Repertory Theatre

For those of us who came of age in the 1960s, Texas Democrat Lyndon Baines Johnson was larger than life. 

Johnson had years of Congressional politicking under his belt when he was thrust into the presidency after John F. Kennedy's assassination. He used that political experience to change America. The Johnson administration ushered in a new era for civil rights, as well as environmental protections, among other cultural paradigm shifts.

Canadians Cope With Crushed Keystone XL Dreams

Nov 19, 2014
Protesters of the Keystone Pipeline in San Francisco, Calif., in November 2013.
Flickr Photo/Enviros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about Canadians' response to the United States Senate's rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline and the results of the Vancouver, B.C. mayoral race.

Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/SLV Native (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Eric Schinfeld about how Washington business are being affected by a work slowdown at the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma. Schinfeld is oresident of the Washington Council on International Trade.

Then, Marcie Sillman gets reaction from International Longshore and Warehouse Union spokesperson Craig Merrilees.

Roosevelt High School, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

After 13 students at Roosevelt High School in Seattle came down with whooping cough, Seattle Public Schools looked at their records and saw they had all been immunized against the highly contagious, bacterial illness.

If they were vaccinated, how did they contract whooping cough, or pertussis?

Pages