The Record

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Bill Radke speaks with Julia Angwin, ProPublica reporter and author of the article "Amazon says it puts customers first. But its pricing algorithm doesn't."

When Olympia was run by (musical) women

Sep 21, 2016
The band Sleater-Kinney is one of the most famous products of the 90s punk scene in Olympia, Washington.
Flickr Photo/peta_azak (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with Len Balli about the history of punk music in Olympia. Balli is the curator of a new exhibit at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma that displays called "A Revolution You Can Dance To." 

Bill Radke talks to Susie Lee, the co-founder and CEO of Siren, about her experience as a women in the tech industry and how she thinks we should change it. 

KUOW Photo

"What the F" is the book's title. The author actually wanted the title to be more explicit. He'll tell you why he cusses in front of his own child.

Also, a Washington State University professor will tell you why it matters that workout clothes don't fit many plus sized women.

And you solve Captain Kirk's ethical dilemmas in an exhibit at Seattle's EMP.

Listen to the full show above or check out one of the stories:

Bill Radke talks to Washington State University professor Deborah A. Christel about a recent study she co-authored on plus-sized women and athletic clothing. In the study, she found that a majority of plus-sized women, or women who wear the size 16 and over, had to shop in the mens' clothing section to find athletic clothing that fit them. 

Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with Benjamin K. Bergen about his new book, "What the F." In the book, Bergen explains why we find profanity so shocking, but also so appealing at the same time. Bergen is a professor of cognitive science at University of California San Diego. 

Bill Radke speaks with Subway franchisee owner David Jones about secure scheduling rules passed by the city of Seattle on Monday. Jones says the new rules will make things much harder for businesses like his. 

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of the technology news site GeekWire, about why some business and political leaders are working to create an "emerging Cascadia innovation corridor," joining the tech centers in Vancouver and Seattle.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Seattle is not a natural city, it had had lots of cosmetic surgery. What if we had fired the surgeon?

Also, you can tell your smart phone you're pregnant, but what happens when you want to stop talking about that pregnancy?

And Seattle is about to pass new rules on how companies schedule their workers. What does this say about who really has the power in this city?

Listen to the full show above or check out one of the stories:

The Duwamish River isn't naturally straight - we did that while building the city of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/King County, WA (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke sits down with Crosscut's Knute Berger to discuss Seattle's many massive engineering projects that it has undertaken over the years. Berger wonders what the city would have been like if we hadn't straightened the Duwamish River or gotten rid of Denny Hill: Would we have been a city at all? 

Amy Pittman received a box with sample formula from a company that got her information from a pregnancy app. Pittman had already miscarried when the box arrived.
Courtesy of Amy Pittman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Amy Pittman about her miscarriage and how the internet missed one of the biggest moments in her life. Pittman wrote an essay for the New York Times' Modern Love column about her experience. She tells Yandel what reaction she's received and how she thinks differently about big data. 

Bill Radke speaks with Josh Feit about the behind the scenes politics of the City Council vote on a new secure scheduling law. Feit is the politics editor at Seattle Met and editor of their local politics blog PubliCola. 

Shilo Murphy holds drug paraphernalia that his needle exchange supplies to users on an alley off the Ave.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kim Malcolm talks with Caleb Banta-Green, an opiate addiction expert and a member of the King County Heroin and Prescription Opiate Taskforce, about Seattle possibly becoming the first U.S. city to create a safe-consumption site for heroin users.

Courtesy of Julia Harrison

Bill Radke speaks with food anthropologist Julia Harrison about how Washington state became the king of apple production in America. 

KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Seattle and King County might set up safe injection sites where users can shoot heroin with a nurse on hand.

Also, you'll meet the author of "TheUnderground Railroad," a fictional take on that path from slavery. It just got nominated today for a National Book Award.

And we're getting into apple picking time, so how did Washington become apple dominant?

Listen to the full show above or check out one of the stories: