The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about the ideas that matter most to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

Have a story that we should be talking about? Tell us! Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

Kara McDermott for KUOW

Bill Radke talks to Staff Sergeant Patricia King about how President Trump's restriction on transgender individuals from serving in the military affects their lives and jobs. King was the first infantryman to reveal she is transgender. She has been serving in the Army for 18 years and is a recipient of a Bronze Star. 

The Record: Tuesday, August 29, Full Show

Aug 29, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

President Trump has ordered a ban on transgender people serving in the military. You'll meet the first U.S. infantryman to come out as trans. She's at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and she'll be with us today.

Also, should the city of Seattle guarantee free college tuition?

And you'll meet the public radio host who was covering a rally in Berkeley last weekend and saw a demonstrator on the ground being beaten by an anti-fascist group. Al Letson will tell you what he did next and what he learned.

Chihuly Glass and Garden, Seattle, Washington
Flickr Photo/James Walsh (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qHQGNs

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Seattle glass artist Benjamin Moore about a lawsuit that has been filed against Dale Chihuly and how artists work with assistants to create their pieces. 

The Record: Monday, August 28, Full Show

Aug 28, 2017
KUOW Photo

Seattle area rescue teams are headed to Houston to help with Tropical Storm Harvey. What do they do when they get there and how dangerous will it be?

You'll also hear about Amazon's takeover of Whole Foods. What happened to the price of a "whole-paycheck avocado"? Has Seattle become overly dependent on Amazon's success?

And if Dale Chihuly didn't personally blow that glass, do you still have a Chihuly?

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times report Mike Rosenberg about his article that shows how Seattle has become a company town for Amazon.

Crosscut Columnist Knute Berger also joins the conversation to talk about how he has seen this same pattern with Boeing and Microsoft before.

We also hear from listener on how this change has impacted them.

Texas National Guard soldiers conduct rescue operations in flooded areas around Houston, Texas, 27 August, 2017. (Photos by 1Lt. Zachary West, 100th MPAD)
Flickr Photo/The National Guard/(CC BY 2.0)https://flic.kr/p/XVUhAK

On Sunday, as Harvey pounded Houston with record rainfall and flooding, 17 emergency responders from Washington received a call to help.


Jeannie Yandel speaks with CBC host Stephen Quinn about British Columbia's attempts to slow their escalating housing market. Quinn explains that there has been no relief after a year of a tax on foreign buyers, and attempts to charge people for housing that is left intentionally vacant has also not chipped away at skyrocketing prices. Quinn also explains loopholes that wealthy residents have found to buy up larger tracts of land and turn them into spots for giant mansions.

A wild Pacific salmon, left, next to an escaped farm-raised Atlantic salmon, right, on Aug. 22 at Home Port Seafoods in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks to Renee Erickson, Seattle chef, author and owner of The Walrus and The Carpenter, and Barton Seaver, author, chef and the director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at Harvard University, about farming seafood and the future of salmon consumption. 

The Record: Thursday, August 24, Full Show

Aug 24, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Go fishing, catch as many escaped Atlantic salmon as you can. That's the message from Washington Fish and Wildlife after a pen at a fish farm near Anacortes broke last weekend and thousands of Atlantic salmon escaped.

Also, we'll look at what we can learn from failure and why colleges and universities are teaching students how to fail.

And we know traffic is terrible, talking about it is the worst, but that doesn't stop the people who tweet about traffic for Washington Department of Transportation from trying to make us laugh about it.

Courtesy of WSDOT/Ally Barrera

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ally Barrera and Mike Allende, the minds behind two of Washington Department of Transportation's Twitter accounts, @wsdot and @wsdot_traffic. They are known for posting gifs, memes and hand drawn maps to make Seattle area traffic just a little less awful. 

Wallingford is one of several Seattle neighborhoods that will see an increase in affordable housing under the citywide rezone
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9jiSQm

Jeannie Yandel talks to Becco Zou, a realtor with Berkshire Hathaway in Bellevue, and Marc Stiles, a real estate reporter with the Puget Sound Business Journal, about how foreign buyers impact the local housing market. 

Highway sign on a road entering the Hanford Site
Wikipedia Photo/Ellery (CC BY SA 3.0)/http://bit.ly/1LnhFqH

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Northwest News Network reporter Anna King about the continued problem of cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Eastern Washington. The topic was in the news because John Oliver talked about the contaminated site on his satirical HBO show. 

The Record: Wednesday, Aug 23, Full Show

Aug 23, 2017
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The most contaminated place in the Western Hemisphere is here in Washington state. John Oliver talked about the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, we'll get reaction to his comments, or some might call it trash-talking. It was kind of trash-talking.

Also, University of Washington president Ana Mari Cauce is with us this hour. We'll talk about free speech on campus in the wake of Charlottesville, the George Washington statue, and get listener questions in too.

The statue of Vladimir Lenin in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/Martin Deutsch (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o6EKZs

Jeannie Yandel speaks with multiple people about the statue of Vladimir Lenin in the Fremont neighborhood. 

Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jeannie Yandel talks to University of Washington associate professor Joe Janes about the Golden Records, a NASA project that compiled sounds and images from earth to send up with NASA's Voyager spacecraft in the hopes of it reaching extraterrestrial life.

Jeannie Yandel talks to Ron Warren, head of the fish program for the Washington State Fish and Wildlife Department, about non-native salmon swimming in Washington water after they escaped from pens at a fish farm off the coast of Cypress Island near Anacortes.  

What are we going to do about 300,000 farmed Atlantic salmon that escaped a hatchery near Anacortes? They might be a risk to wild Puget Sound salmon. Fish and Wildlife says: grab your fishing pole. You can catch as many as you want.

And what should we do about that statue of Vladimir Lenin in Fremont? Mayor Ed Murray wants it to come down, and he's not alone. Should we take it down, or leave it up? We'll take your calls.

Plus, if you could send any message into outer space, what would it be and why? Joe Janes of the Documents That Changed the World podcast comes by to talk about what he calls one of the most important letters in human history.

Confederate flag
Flickr Photo/pixxiestails (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Melanie McFarland, T.V. critic for Salon, and Mike Pesca, host of The Gist, about a proposed HBO show called Confederate. The show imagines a world where the South won the Civil War, slavery still exists in parts of the United States and the country is on the brink of it's third civil war. 

Museum goers test out their eclipse glasses on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Pacific Science Center before the start of the solar eclipse, in Seattle. KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks to KUOW producer Matt Martin about his experience viewing the total solar eclipse in Oregon. We also hear from Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA's chief scientist, about what it was like to view the eclipse from the air in a plane. 

Well, that was pretty cool. Clouds rolled in, the sky grew dark, the temperature dropped. Did you watch the eclipse? We talk with a KUOW producer who traveled to Oregon to experience totality, and a NASA scientist who chased the eclipse in a plane.

Plus, we'll learn more about the history of the Confederate monument at Seattle's Lakeview Cemetery, try to sort out whether we need to tear down meeting places for white supremacists on the Internet, and debate whether American slavery can ever be fodder for entertaining television.

Flickr Photo/ Kevin Hale (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5aVZD3

What will the eclipse be like for those in the Puget Sound region?  

The Record: Thursday, August 17, Full Show

Aug 17, 2017
KUOW control room studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill learns something that startled him" Monday's eclipse is going to make clouds roll in to Puget Sound! Also, when will the eclipse start? Where should you watch it? What would it be like to go to Oregon for the total eclipse? Will Bonnie Tyler be singing "Total Eclipse of the Heart" live during the event? We'll ask a University of Washington expert all your eclipse questions.

Also, we'll explode the myth of the loner genius tech nerd. It's a stereotype that's not true and it brings us misguided workers and bad gadgets.

And you'll meet a local sportswriter who says if Seahawks star Michael Bennett doesn't want to stand during the national anthem he should quit the team.

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There’s a stereotype of tech workers that’s been circulating for some time now. It says the programmer checklist goes something like this:

Glasses repaired with tape.

Wears shorts and sandals at all times.

Works alone, possibly from parents’ basement.

President Donald Trump talks with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg upon his arrival on Air Force One at Charleston International Airport in North Charleston, S.C., Friday, Feb. 17, 2017.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Bill Radke talks to Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about why the CEO of Boeing stayed on President Trump's manufacturing council (until it disbanded) and how the president's tweet about Amazon will affect the company. 

Comedians Hari Kondabolu, left, and Dwayne Kennedy, right.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Dwayne Kennedy chat with KUOW's Bill Radke on the threat from North Korea, performing in front of conservative audiences and what threat Hillary Clinton would have posed to the world. 


The Record: Wednesday, August 16, Full Show

Aug 16, 2017
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KUOW Photo

President Trump: If Robert E. Lee statues come down, what about statues of the slave holder George Washington? We have one of those in Seattle -- a 14-foot tall bronze statue of Washington at the university of Washington. What purpose does it serve? Should it come down? We'll debate that.

Also, Seattle mayoral candidate Nikkita Oliver concedes the primary election but endorsed no one. Does she have no preference between Jenny Durkan and Cary Moon? We'll ask her.

The Record: Tuesday, August 15, Full Show

Aug 15, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Seattle's mayor denies allegations that he sexually abused teenagers decades ago. Some people want him to resign anyway for the sake of all the victims whose true stories were not believed. But what about Murray's right to be presumed innocent? What about the rights of Seattle citizens to an orderly transition of power? We'll have that debate.

Also, Seattle is the first American city to use democracy vouchers -- tax money that citizens use to support candidates of their choice. We'll see how it's going so far.

And on a lighter note, a creamier note, two giants of Seattle ice cream will tell you ice cream stories and take your flavor suggestions.

From left, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, former Gov. Chris Gregoire and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray at the back of a helicopter overlooking a flood zone in Washington state. Story goes that only the women in the WA delegation were brave enough to scoot this far.
Courtesy of Maria Cantwell's office

"There's never a time when a woman really wins anything," says political strategist Cathy Allen.

After Seattle's 2017 mayoral race primary, Allen and University of Washington professor Cate Goethals discussed gender equity in politics and business on KUOW's The Record. 

Bill Radke talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about Seahawks player Michael Bennett's decision to sit during the national anthem at the Seahawks' first pre-season game against the San Diego Chargers. 

The Record: Monday, August 14, Full Show

Aug 14, 2017
KUOW Photo

Yesterday's counter-demonstrators tried to push past police to confront a Patriot Prayer rally in Westlake Park. What is the best response to bigotry?

Also, Seattle will have its first woman mayor in about a century. We'll talk to two woman who say there's a lot more to be done.

And a Seahawks star refuses to stand during yesterday's national anthem.

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