The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

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Bill Radke talks with former sportscaster Tony Ventrella, Democratic candidate for Congress in Washington's 8th Congressional District. Ventrella made it through Tuesday's top-two primary election despite abandoning his campaign at the beginning of July.

Flickr Photo/Jun Seita (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ct1wT3

Bill Radke talks with Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful podcast about summer barbecue etiquette.

On the latest episode of The Sporkful, Pashman's listeners submitted questions on the topic, including whether it is problematic to host a bring-your-own-meat barbecue, or if it is ever OK to flip someone else's meat and more. Pashman shared some of his insights on the topic as well as specific rules Seattle barbecuers should be wary of.

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's environmental reporter Ashley Ahearn about the growing debate around oil trains traveling through Washington state and why we are in the crosshairs for even more trains carrying crude oil from the Bakken Shale in North Dakota. 

Amber Hayward and her sons
Courtesy of Amber Hayward

Amber Hayward's kids weren't sold when she started speaking Lushootseed at home. It sounded different and some of the words were hard to say. 

But Hayward kept at it. She made her bathroom, where she gets ready, an English-free zone. From there she hollered at her kids in Lushootseed to guide them through their morning routine: Brush your teeth, get dressed, wash your face. And in time, her kids got on board. 

Larches are a staple of the North Cascades.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with author Ana Maria Spagna about the natural beauty of the North Cascades National Park in Washington. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Parks Service. Spagna has lived and worked in the North Cascades for the past 15 years.  

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a tax on foreign buyers purchasing residential properties in Vancouver. 

Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

The votes are mostly in for the Washington state primary elections on Tuesday. We'll tell you the stuff you need to know and why it's fascinating.

Also, even more billionaires than usual are in Seattle this week, along with marquee artists, for the Seattle Art Fair.

And Portland is ending an experiment in helping homeless people. We'll talk about that and see what Seattle is trying to do.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter Amelia Templeton about the decision by Portland Mayor Charlie Hales to reverse his policy allowing homeless people to camp in public parks or on sidewalks.

Art critic Jen Graves.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Jen Graves, art critic for The Stranger, about the Seattle Art Fair. The fair, which takes place from August 4-7 at CenturyLink Field Event Center (and other venues around the city), is an opportunity for big gallerists to sell (very expensive) art and for local artists to expand their audiences.

flossing teeth tooth
Flickr Photo/BGeoFoto (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dM5JKK

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle dentist Dr. George Knutsen about whether or not people should floss. It's one of the most universal public health recommendations and yet the most recent dietary guidelines from the federal government have removed the recommendation to floss. The government says the efficacy of flossing has never been researched. 

The Record: Tuesday, July 2, full show

Aug 2, 2016
KUOW control room studio
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

The city of Seattle has cracked down on conversion therapy, saying a therapist cannot change someone’s sexual orientation. We’ll find out what that means.

Also, residents of the McNeil Island Commitment Center for sex offenders say being locked up does not mean they should have to bathe in brown, smelly water.

And on a more appetizing note, the Space Needle restaurant is still revolving after all these years. Why are other rotating restaurants slowly winding down?

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Courtesy of MOHAI, Milkie Studio Collection

Bill Radke talks to writer Heather Wells Peterson about the history of revolving restaurants. She wrote an article about it for Lucky Peach. The restaurant on top of the Space Needle, SkyCity Restaurant, is the world's oldest operating revolving restaurant, but they date back all the way to the Roman Empire when the emperor Nero had one. 

Revolving restaurants enjoyed their heyday in the U.S. during the Cold War, but have largely fallen out of fashion since then. But, Peterson explains, they are gaining traction in some Asian countries and in the Middle East.

Ballot drop box in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Donovan, political science professor at Western Washington University, about the low voter turnouts for Washington's August primaries. Donovan is also an elected council member in Whatcom County. 

Bill Radke talks to Kenny Ocker, reporter for The News Tribune about the brown water at McNeil Island's Special Commitment Center, home to violent sex offenders post-sentencing. 

The 1936 Olympic team crewed the wooden Husky Clipper, which now hangs in a place of honor above the the crew dining hall.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

Marcie Sillman speaks with Judy Willman, daughter of Joe Rantz, about how finding "swing" with the 1936 University of Washington rowing team changed her father's life. The nine boys on that legendary team beat staggering odds to win gold in the Berlin Olympics.

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