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The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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The Record: Wednesday, May 3, Full Show

May 3, 2017
KUOW control room studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Another accuser, another denial: That's the latest development in the sexual abuse case and Seattle mayor Ed Murray.

Also, Seattle rap star Macklemore is being sued for allegedly sounding too much like a certain jazz musician.

And author Lemony Snicket will tell you why kids should read about unfortunate events.

FLICKR PHOTO/hackNY.org (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bHLu96

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Mike Carter about the case of Roman Seleznev. Seleznev's story reads like spy fiction. He is the illegitimate son of a prominent Russian politician and Putin ally. He grew up in poverty, with an alcoholic mother who died when he was a teenager. Without a mother and abandoned by his powerful father, 17-year-old Seleznev ended up living on the streets.

Seleznev went on to steal and sell hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of credit card numbers, many from businesses here in Washington state. U.S. authorities pursued Seleznev around the globe and finally, they arrested him and brought him to Washington for trial.

He was just convicted and sentenced to 27 years in prison.

Will Seattle finally have an income tax?

May 2, 2017

On Monday the Seattle City Council unanimously passed a resolution to pursue an income tax on the richest households. This is the first step towards Seattle passing an ordinance that would impose a 1.5 percent tax on the incomes of those making over $250,000 a year.

Proponents say it could raise $125 million a year. But critics, including the Seattle Times Editorial Board said last week that this move hurts more than helps the city’s cause. 

The Record: Tuesday, May 2, Full Show

May 2, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Along Mercer Street in South Lake Union the Mercer mess is now less messy because there are new traffic lights that match the flow of the cars. So how come all our lights don't work that way?

Plus, Microsoft wants our schoolchildren to learn in virtual reality. We'll tell you about the company's big push into the classroom.

And is Seattle's call for an income tax a progressive move to make the rich pay their fair share, or a blunder that hurts more than it helps?

KUOW host Bill Radke visits a gun range and learns how to shoot a sem-automatic weapon.
KUOW Photo/Shane Mehling

Bill Radke visits a gun range with journalist and gun advocate Dave Workman. Workman teaches Radke how to fire a semi-automatic weapon and explains why he supports second amendment rights. Workman also discusses why it's so important for him to carry a firearm. 

Drivers wait to cross Mercer Street
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks to Chris Long, the traffic engineering manager with the city of Bellevue, about adaptive traffic lights and how they can change the flow of traffic in busy areas. 

The protesters behind May Day

May 2, 2017

Bill Radke talks with reporter Liz Jones about the May Day protests. She describes the crowds, the increased tensions due to President Trump and what protestors hope to accomplish with their marching.  

People walk in the May Day labor march in Seattle on Friday, May 1, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke talks to Eli Sanders, associate editor for the Stranger, about May Day protests — from the traditional immigrants' rights and workers' rights march that has taken place for the last 18 years to the more recent marches lead by anarchists.  

Sanders wrote about the antigovernment protesters and May Day last year in the Stranger.

The Record: Monday, May 1, Full Show

May 1, 2017

We'll take you live to a Seattle May Day march. We'll tell you why Seattle May Day is the way it is and consider how long the anarchy can last.

Also, we'll tell you why the West Point Sewage Treatment plant failed and why it matters.

And should a violent felon be able to write the New York Times crossword puzzle? We'll tell you the story of a Washington state convict and what it says about redemption.

FLICKR PHOTO/Chip Griffin(CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xNLFK

Bill Radke speaks with Bremerton Police Chief Steven Strachan about a controversial crossword puzzle published in the New York Times.

Hops pickers at Titus Farm, on the site of modern-day Kent (formerly known as Titusville). Titus farm and Titusville were named after the same prominent family of settlers. Everett E. Titus in white shirt.
White River Valley Museum Collection, Gift of Erle Titus.

When Kent, Washington, was first settled by Europeans, it was called Titusville. So why the name change? Because of beer.

Or, to be more precise, because of hops.

Or, to be even more precise, because of western Washington's great 19th-century hops craze.


Bill Radke talks with Bellevue City Council member Kevin Wallace about homelessness in Bellevue.

Jacque Larrainzar, one of the first people from Mexico to be granted asylum in the United States based on her sexuality.
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Jacque Larrainzar fled Mexico in the late 1990s. She asked the woman at the airport how far she could go with the $300 in her pocket, and the woman suggested she fly to Seattle.

The Record: Thursday, April 27, Full Show

Apr 27, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant has called for a peaceful shutdown of the airport and freeways on Monday — May Day. The Washington State Patrol says that's irresponsible. Sawant joins us.

And President Trump is reviewing national monuments, including two in Washington state. What are the pros and cons of rolling back some government protected areas?

And we'll talk with the NPR editor who's tracking Trump's many conflicts of interest.

San Juan Islands National Monument
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with the New York Times Seattle bureau chief Kirk Johnson about the latest executive order from President Donald Trump to review national monuments created in the past 20 years. There are two of those monuments here in Washington: the San Juan Islands National Monument and the Hanford Reach National Monument. 

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