The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about ideas that matter to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

What's your story? Tell us. Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

You walk briskly into an airport. You're running late. You need to know your departure gate. But that board! That big board with all the flight information that's not your flight. You have to squint and scan while the security line gets longer and longer. Well what if that board only displayed your flight information? And that guy standing behind you? He looks at the board and only sees his flight information.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, turning his back on the camera as we might wish to turn our backs on his network.
Flickr Photo/Alessio Jacona (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/Du4fYm

#DeleteFacebook is trending right now… on Twitter. And that’s part of the problem, says Abby Ohlheiser. She reports on digital culture for the Washington Post, and says that while we wish we could kick our social network habits, the reality is much more complicated than it seems.

The Record: Thursday, April 5, 2018

Apr 5, 2018
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KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Geekwire’s Todd Bishop has seen the future of your eyeballs – at least where screened displays are concerned. What if we could all look at the same screen and each see different things? It’s called parallel reality (which, arguably, we are all already living in): this is what it might mean for you.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke talks to Andrew McIntosh, aerospace reporter for The Puget Sound Business Journal, about the effect China's new tariffs will have on Boeing and the Puget Sound area's aerospace community. 

Photo courtesy of Kit Kovacs of Norwegian Polar Institute

Bill Radke talks to Dr. Kate Stafford, University of Washington Oceanographer, about her latest study on the songs bowhead whales sing and why they are surprisingly more varied than other whales. 

The Record: Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Apr 4, 2018
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KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

50 years ago today, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Junior was shot to death on the balcony of a Memphis motel. Bill Radke spoke with King County Councilmember Larry Gossett and former King County Executive Ron Sims about their memories of that day, and the legacy of racism in Seattle.

A woman walks past a large mural of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the side of a diner, painted by artist James Crespinel in the 1990's and later restored, along Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tuesday, April 3, 2018, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Fifty years ago today, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered on a balcony in Memphis, Tennessee. Decades later, a motion passed in the King County Council to rename the county for King, rather than a slave owner from Alabama. 

Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.
Wikimedia Commons

On April 4, 1968,  Gary Heyde had just arrived for a conference at Kentucky State College. He and more than 500 students from every major black university waited in line to register. Heyde happened to be the only white student there.

No more than 20 minutes had passed when a girl came running into the lobby where conference-goers waited to register. “They’ve killed Martin,” she screamed.

At first, the room was cloaked in complete and total silence. Then chaos ensued.

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke talks to historian, author and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell about America's troubled history and how it can better help us understand today. 

Seattle’s KOMO and other local affiliates were swept up in controversy after they were required to read a script written by the conservative Sinclair Media Group, which owns 200 local stations across the country. This Deadspin video captured the eerie repetition.

The Record: Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Apr 3, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

There’s been an outcry in the city over the limited amount of parking developers are required to provide as dense apartment buildings rise. Now the city will allow residences to be built without any parking at all. How hard should it be to park a car in Seattle?

Ricky Garcia and Lauren Davis are fighting to pass Ricky's Law in the Washington State Legislature that would allow involuntary committment for addicts.
Courtesy of Lauren Davis

If someone you love wants to hurt themselves, what can you do? If the underlying cause is mental illness, one option is to have them involuntarily committed for psychiatric treatment. But if the underlying cause is addiction, that was not an option until the passage of Ricky's Law in 2016.

Ricky Garcia and Lauren Davis worked with state lawmakers to pass a bill that would let someone in Washington state involuntarily commit an addict who is found to be a danger to him or herself.  Bill Radke brings Davis back into the studio for an update on the implementation of the law, which took effect Monday. 

Photo Courtesy of FBI Records

In the early 2000s ten Russian nationals were living normal lives in the United States. They went to school, got jobs, and tried to infiltrate the inner circles of U.S. policymakers and businesses to send information back to Russia.

Dr. Tara Westover, author of the new memoir "Educated," at the KUOW studios on April 2nd, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Your views on politics, your understanding of history, your personal identity: You feel pretty solid about them, right? But what if you didn't? 

Standard Oil depicted as an octopus, parodying its status as a monopoly.
Public Domain

In 1890, the Sherman Act was passed. Its purpose was to preserve a competitive marketplace against potential consumer abuses.

But the law isn't supposed to punish "innocent monopoly," or monopoly achieved by merit alone. So the question is: how innocent is Amazon’s monopoly? 

The Record: Monday, April 2, 2018

Apr 2, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

What can you do if someone you love is addicted to a drug? If reasoning, pleading, and staging an intervention fail? In Washington state, soon you'll have a new option. It's called Ricky's Law. We spoke to the woman pushing for that legislation in 2016; she's back to tell us what's changed since the law passed.

Bill Radke talks to Melanie McFarland, TV critic at Salon about the new reboot of Roseanne and what it says about America today. 

Flickr Photo/The West End (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fqqMid

Bill Radke talks to Naomi Tomky, Seattle food writer about a dish that she thinks is a strong contender to be Seattle's 'signature dish.' Hint: there is seafood involved. No, not geoduck. Seattle TV critic Melanie McFarland joins the conversation. 

Handing over the keys to a new rental property.
Flickr Photo/harry b (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/xSNB92

If you’ve rented a new apartment in Seattle in the last year, chances are that you ran into the first-in-time law. It required landlords to rent to the first qualified applicant. When enacted, the law was touted as a first in the nation attempt to protect tenants’ rights. Landlords argued that it overrode their property rights – and yesterday, a judge agreed. 

The Record: Thursday, March 29, 2018

Mar 29, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

In January 2017, Seattle implemented a law saying that landlords were required to rent their units to the first qualified applicant. The law was the first of its kind in the nation, and designed to fight bias and discrimination. As of yesterday, that law has been struck down. Liz Dupee of the Tenants Union of Washington State and Chris Benis of the Rental Housing Association of Washington joined Bill Radke to discuss the law’s intention and consequences.

Facebook phone
Flickr Photo/Stock Catalog (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/23qV3ca

Have you deleted your Facebook yet? Last week alarm bells were ringing as we learned about the data Facebook has on us and what they can do with it.

We found out that a British marketing company used Facebook data to build personality profiles of its users. This marketing firm, Cambridge Analytica, would sell that personality profile to politicians like Donald Trump promising that this information could win votes.

But was that ever true? Can Facebook data swing elections? Bill Radke talks with Antonio Garcia Martinez, who helped Facebook figure out how user data can point ads at you.

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner displays a pen from the signing ceremony of Washington State's Equal Pay Opportunity Act.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Starbucks claims to have solved the thorny problem of pay equity. At least in their current workforce. At least in the US. And this isn’t a final announcement, just a milestone in an ongoing endeavor…

The Record: Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Mar 28, 2018
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

AG Bob Ferguson is racking up lawsuits of the Trump administration at a terrific pace – 23 and counting. We got him to come up for air to give Bill Radke an update on how the suits are going, and whether he’s angling for the governor’s job in 2020.

The Record: Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Mar 27, 2018
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

In retaliation for the assassination of a former Russian spy and his daughter on British soil, President Trump has shuttered Seattle's Russian consulate. Following the closure last fall of the San Francisco consulate, Russians on the Pacific Coast will now have to travel east to get passports, visas, and conduct other business with their government.

Seattle Congressmember Pramila Jayapal was in the studio today, and spoke with Bill Radke about why she supports the closing of the consulate, whether she'll join the call to repeal the Second Amendment, and more. 

Closeup of a dictionary page.
Flickr Photo/Marcy Leigh (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/Q34Sfh

"Moist."

Did you get a little grossed out reading that? If so, you're not alone. Moist is one of the most hated words in the American English language. But why do we have such strong feelings about an ostensibly neutral word?

Which world would you rather be flying in? (The Astrovision one, clearly.)
Astrovision promotional materials

"When this movie's over, the audience will be halfway across the country."

This is not because they'll have fled the scene. Instead, it's an introduction to Astrovision, American Airlines' 1960s answer to other airlines' dominant single screen. It allowed individual film choice and a view of the skies - with consequences that ranged from the dangerous to the absurd. 

Bill Radke talks to Don Hellmann, professor emeritus at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies about the U.S. State Department's decision to close the Russian consulate in Seattle and expel 60 Russian diplomats in response to an attack on an ex-spy for Russia in England. 

The Record: Monday, March 26, 2018

Mar 26, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The White House announced today that it was shutting down the Russian consulate in Seattle. The State Department says there are intelligence agents working at the consulate and they are too close to sensitive locations like Boeing and the US navel base in Kitsap County. Don Hellman, professor emeritus at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies explains what that means for U.S. and Russian relations. 

The Record: Thursday, March 22, 2018

Mar 22, 2018
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KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Thinking of deleting Facebook? We'll get into just how much the social network knows about you and what you can do about it with University of Maryland computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck and contemplate walking away with The Stranger's Sean Nelson.

Then, what are you supposed to do as a woman working in tech when your mostly male company does business at a strip club, in the middle of the day? We'll talk with "Brotopia" author Emily Chang and former Amazon employee Kristi Coulter about Silicon Valley's boys' club problem.

A group of people jog across Lenora Street, on Thursday, October 5, 2017, in front of Amazon's biodomes, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Bloomberg's Emily Chang, author of the book "Brotopia: Breaking Up The Boy's Club Of Silicon Valley," and Kristi Coulter, former Amazon employee and writer of the upcoming book "Nothing Good Can Come From This," about how the sometimes misogynistic and aggressive work culture in places like Silicon Valley shuts women out of the booming tech industry. 

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