The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

A Young Irish Mom's Painful Decision

Dec 4, 2014
Sian Cullen and her daughter Aine. Cullen was a teenager in Dublin, Ireland when Aine was born. They now live in Seattle.
Courtesy Sian Cullen

I was 16 and going to school; I lived in Dublin and was infatuated with this older fellow who was a jack-the-lad kind of fella.

We met and had a relationship and it was brief. And I got pregnant.

Flickr Photo/xxxtoff (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the return of Avian flu to British Columbia. They also discuss the legal battles of anti-oil pipeline demonstrators.
Inside the Harvard Exit movie theater, which will be closing in January 2015.
Flickr Photo/Andi Szilagyi

Marcie Sillman talks to Lyall Bush, executive director of the Northwest Film Forum, about the cultural legacy of the Harvard Exit Theater and what it's closing means for this area.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-King County NAACP President Gerald Hankerson about police reform in Seattle in the wake recent events in Ferguson, Missouri. 

The Reverend Jesse Jackson speaks with KUOW's Marcie Sillman about tech industry diversity on the University of Washington campus on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The Reverend Jesse Jackson was scheduled to demonstrate this morning in front of Amazon headquarters in downtown Seattle.

Members of the Service Employees International Union rallied there in a show of support for efforts to unionize Amazon's security workers.

Jackson and his Rainbow PUSH Coalition have challenged tech firms around the country to release data on their employee demographics.

Author Robert Dugoni at a book signing at the Tin Room Bar & Grill in Burien, Wash., in 2009.
Flickr Photo/Michael @ NW Lens

Ross Reynolds interviews local novelist Robert Dugoni about his latest mystery, “My Sister’s Grave."

In it, Seattle homicide cop Tracy Crosswhite learns that the remains of her missing younger sister have been found by two hunters in the woods after 20 years.

In the book's acknowledgments, Dugoni writes that real people inspired the main character: Seattle homicide detective Jennifer Southworth and  former King County Sheriff Sue Rahr. 

Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo
Courtesy Seattle Archdiocese, file

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, chair of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' migration committee, about the Roman Catholic Church's push for immigration reform. 

Seattle Public Schools superintendent Larry Nyland.
Courtesy of Seattle Public Schools

The Seattle School Board has delayed a vote on whether to permanently hire Interim Superintendent Larry Nyland.

The vote was scheduled at a meeting Wednesday without any public announcement.

That’s in contrast to the board’s usual process when hiring a superintendent: a months-long national search followed by numerous community meetings with the candidates.

Last night Board President Sharon Peaslee moved to delay the vote by a week to December 10 in order to get more community input.

Conjoined skulls? The digestive tract of a jellyfish? Museums can feature some weird displays.
Flickr Photo/Rooney Wimms (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Victoria Cain, author of the book "Life On Display: Revolutionizing Museums Of Science And Natural History In The United States," about the relationships museums have had with odd and bizarre artifacts.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman gets a recommendation from gifted librarian Nancy Pearl for a book to help those seeking a little relief from the holiday bustle: "2 A.M. at The Cat's Pajamas," by Marie-Helene Bertino.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jon Scholes, chief executive officer of the Downtown Seattle Association, about how local businesses are reacting to continued post-Ferguson protests in Seattle.

Author Anne Lammott at the lighting ceremony for the Rainbow World Fund's World Tree of Hope on Dec. 10, 2013 at San Francisco City Hall
Wikipedia Photo

Spirituality is never far from writer Anne Lamott's mind.

The Bay Area writer, a recovering alcoholic, is a proud and very liberal Christian. She's written extensively about her own life, and about her personal take on the power of prayer to help people get through crises.

Lamott's latest essay collection, "Small Victories," is a compilation of old and new work. In each essay, she contemplates daily, sometimes mundane, manifestations of grace.

KUOW Photo/Matthew Streib

Marcie Sillman talks with Roxanne Fonder Reeve, who, along with a slew of volunteers, is building a trash studio in her Columbia City driveway to teach people how they can build environmentally sustainable housing out of found materials.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.
Flickr Photo/Heisenberg Media (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about how Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's first year on the job went, how tablets are doing in the market and other Seattle tech news.

Isoseismal map of the event.
Wikimedia Commons

In 1872, a mass earthquake rocked the Northwest. It’s on record as one of the most widely felt temblors in the Pacific Northwest.

But the location of the fault line that caused the quake has been a mystery for more than a century. They didn’t even know which side of the Cascades the fault fell.

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