The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

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The Record: Monday, August 15, full show

Aug 15, 2016
Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

People used to say Seattle city government is so bogged down in process it doesn't do anything. Now some people say the city is doing too much too fast. What happened?

Also, the Olympics have shown us a lot of sports, but video gaming is not one of them -- yet. You'll meet one of America's first e-sports college scholarship winners.

And how does the music change when you're making it in a Washington state national park?

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Derek Micheau (bottom) competes in e-sports. He received a scholarship from Robert Morris University for online gaming.
Courtesy of Derek Micheau

Derek Micheau grew up playing baseball in Olympia, Washington. He recently got a sports scholarship to Robert Morris University in Chicago, but not for America’s favorite pastime.

Instead, Derek will be the first student in America to graduate with a  scholarship in e-sports.

Jeremy Pots and Emily Sheil perform in the North Cascades National Park.
Courtesy of Music in the American Wild/Geoff Sheil

Bill Radke speaks with Emlyn Johnson, director of Music in the American Wild, about how nature inspires their musical performances and why they decided to celebrate the National Parks Service's 100th anniversary by touring the parks in Washington state.

A tent in the Jungle, a Seattle homeless encampment believed to have grown out of the original homeless hobo jungle during the Great Depression of the 1930s.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's growth and development reporter Joshua McNichols about the city's plan to close down the homeless encampment under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle and what will happen to the people that live there. 

Bill Radke speaks with Dylan Orr, director of Seattle's Office of Labor Standards, about the new secure scheduling rules proposed by the city and what they would mean for local businesses and workers. 

Bill Radke talks with Ben and Emily Huh about why, after 11 years and one internet cat picture empire in Seattle, they're splitting town for good and moving to the Bay Area.

The Record: Thursday, Aug 11th, Full Show

Aug 11, 2016
Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

The city of Seattle has cracked down on gay conversion therapy -- why does that matter? You'll find out from someone who's been through it. 

Also, Seattle is getting a new music festival. More than music, it's a plot to make sure Seattle bands never have to leave here to make it big. 

Speaking of leaving, it seems like everyone's coming to Seattle. So we'll ask two local celebrities why they are splitting. 

And we'll take you to the other Olympics -- the Olympic National Park. 

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Ballot drop box in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Kim Malcolm speaks with Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman about election fraud and whether or not it could happen in Washington state. 

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with music journalist and Seattle native Ann Powers about Paul Allen's newest venture: a three-day music festival and industry conference called Upstream.

Festival organizers say they will "collide music, gaming, tech, media, design, and more to tackle today’s toughest industry challenges and open up opportunities within the new entertainment economy."

Seven Lakes Basin in Olympic National Park.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with local poet and writer Tim McNulty about what makes Olympic National Park unique to Washington state. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. McNulty is the author of "Olympic National Park:  A Natural History."

Courtesy of Colin Boyd Shafer

Earlier this month, Seattle became the third city in the country to ban gay conversion therapy. It's an issue that touches Garrard Conley close to home. He grew up in Arkansas, the son of a pastor. 

When he was 18 years old, his parents found out he was gay and gave him an ultimatum: Go to gay conversion therapy, or you are no longer a part of this family. 

The road that winds around Sea-Tac Airport.
Flickr Photo/Ping Li (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://bit.ly/2aPcgPp

Last month, the Port of Seattle chose a new taxi company to serve Sea-Tac Airport. East Side For Hire won the exclusive contract.

The change happened quietly in the middle of last month. But the Port Commission meeting yesterday was anything but quiet.


The Record: Wednesday, Aug 10th, full show

Aug 10, 2016
KUOW Photo

The city of Seattle passed a new law restricting who landlords can refuse to rent to -- what does a Seattle landlord say about that?

In Rio, Olympic athletes are scoffing at Russian swimmers who've been caught doping. We'll talk to a former Olympic medalist from Sammamish who got a very different reaction when she called out dopers 40 years ago. 

And what happens when you're afraid to call the police because you don't know how they'll react to your son?

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

Wendy Boglioli won bronze in the Women's 100 metres Butterfly and gold in the Women's 4 × 100 metres Freestyle Relay at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Bill Radke speaks with swimmer Wendy Boglioli about facing off against the East German women's swimming team at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

The massively powerful East German swimmers, who were later found to have been systematically doped by their government, took gold after gold in event after event. The Americans were entirely shut out -- until the last race. 

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