The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

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Seattle Post-Intelligencer photo/Museum Of History & Industry

Did you know that fur is still a big industry in Seattle?

One of the main ways this region became settled and explored was by fur trappers in the early 19th century. And fur farms are still scattered throughout Washington.

A health care worker gives some much needed maternal care to an infant whose mother died from Ebola.
Courtesy of Karin Huster

Most days, Seattle nurse Karin Huster woke up around 6 a.m. for a quick bucket shower and breakfast before walking over to the Ebola treatment unit in Port Loko, Sierra Leone.

Outside, ambulances would queue up at all times of the day, packed with as many as eight patients at all stages of illness.

Marcie Sillman talks to Hugh Spitzer, University of Washington law professor, about the constitutionality of the Senate Republicans' rule change for bringing new taxes to a vote on the full Senate floor.

A new year is a good time to try something new. Librarian Nancy Pearl talks to KUOW's Marcie Sillman about a first-time novelist from Spokane named S.M. Hulse. Her book, set in Montana, is called "Black River."

Flickr Photo/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Washington state lawmakers have a lot on their plates this legislative session: everything from how to fully fund basic education to a debate over how to control pollution. But some legislators also put medical marijuana regulation on their priority list.

Ross Reynolds talks with author Joel Kotkin about his new book, "The New Class Conflict."

biotech file photo
Flickr Photo/HCC PIO (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks to Luke Timmerman about the growth of a Seattle biotech company, Adaptive Biotechnologies, and what it means for the city's biotechnology industry.

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes about the City Council's consideration of changing the name of the crime "patronizing a prostitute" to "sexual exploitation."

Also, Dr. Melinda Chateauvert, author of "Sex Workers Unite: A History Of The Movement From Stonewall to SlutWalk," explains why she believes the use of the term "sexual exploitation" to describe the crime is wrong. 

Governor Jay Inslee.
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia corespondent Austin Jenkins about the politics around the carbon tax and other issues facing the state legislature this session. 

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Mark Schoesler, the new Republican state Senate Majority Leader, about his background, the issues he cares about and his governing philosophy. 

Amazon's "Transparent" received two Golden Globes on Sunday.
Facebook Photo/Transparent

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, GeekWire co-founder, about Amazon's big win at the Golden Globes. They also discuss the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. 

Flickr Photo/U.S. Fish & Wildlife (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There is no such thing as a seahawk, but you super fans probably knew that already.

“Seahawk is one of those colloquial terms much like a sparrowhawk or buzzard or seagull,” said ornithologist John Klicka of the University of Washington's Burke Museum. “From a sort of a scientific perspective there's no such thing.”

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch makes a run against the Baltimore Ravens at CenturyLink Field in 2011.
Flickr Photo/JBLM PAO (CC0-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to John Vidale who explains how local seismologists are harnessing the power of Seahawks fans to test new earthquake sensor technology. Vidale is a professor of earth and space science at University of Washington and the director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, which allows you to track the shaking of CenturyLink Field during the Seahawks game.

A small gathering at Red Square to discuss the events that have unfolded in Paris.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Several dozen students and Francophiles gathered in Red Square on the University of Washington campus on Friday in light of the tragic events that unfolded this week in Paris.

They formed a loose circle and discussed freedom of expression, what they love about France and how they were handling the news that two gunman had entered the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine and killed 12 staffers. The gunmen died Friday after a standoff with police. 

Zachary Gian, an exchange student from France, said it has been hard to watch the news.

Ross Reynolds talks with John Nichols, Washington correspondent for The Nation, about the role of federal mediators in settling labor disputes.

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