The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Ways To Connect

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dr. Annette Estes, the director of University of Washington's autism center, about employing people with autism.

Desk school education
Flickr Photo/alamosbasement (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., about the revised No Child Left Behind bill she crafted with Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.

UW To Give Minority Law Students A Helping Hand

Apr 16, 2015
University of Washington Law School
Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kellye Testy, dean of the University of Washington Law School, about their Gregoire Fellows program. The program aims to boost diversity in the law school and the legal profession.

Real Change Street Paper Goes Digital

Apr 16, 2015

Bill Radke speaks with Tim Harris, founding director of Real Change, about the newspaper's decision to offer a digital edition to readers.

The Holocaust memorial in Berlin.
Flickr Photo/Rodrigo David (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with 89-year-old Holocaust survivor Sonia Warshawski and her granddaughter, Seattle-based filmmaker Leah Warshawski.

In this 2012 file photo, Troy Kelley, the Democratic candidate for state auditor at the time, takes questions at a debate.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Brunell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins and local attorney Bob Chadwell about the unfolding story of Washington state auditor Troy Kelley's indictment and what the legal ramifications could be.

Katherine Switz, founder of the Stability Network.
Courtesy of Katherine Switz

When a GermanWings passenger jet slammed into the French Alps last month, killing all aboard, attention focused on the co-pilot’s treatment for severe depression – and how he hid his illness.

An estimated 58 percent of Americans don’t want people with mental health issues in their workplace, even though a vast majority of people with such illnesses can work just fine.

Donnie Wilburn, who is blind, and her husband Bob Wilburn observe a depiction of the Battle of Little Bighorn at the Seattle Art Museum with the help of a vivid description from museum docent laureate Suzanne Ragen.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Read this description, then imagine the art:

It’s a large ceramic jar, created in the 12th century by the Anasazi people who lived in the Southwest and the Colorado plateau.

The decoration on the jar is black and white, and there are stripes, likely to represent rain. Jagged embellishments could mean lightening.

“Then strange little hands, some with five fingers some with six fingers,” says docent Suzanne Ragen, who leads tours for the visually impaired at Seattle Art Museum. She has led tours at SAM for 50 years. 

People do better on tests of alertness and motor performance after power naps, says Dr. James Hamblin, health columnist at The Atlantic. But he says he's not a supporter of napping every day at work.
Flickr Photo/bark (CC BY 2.0)

This week an Alaska Airlines baggage handler fell asleep in the cargo hold of an airplane before takeoff, forcing an emergency landing at Sea-Tac Airport. (Nobody was hurt.) Should we take more naps at work? Bill Radke asked Dr. James Hamblin, senior editor and health columnist at The Atlantic.

Students at the Fiddleheads, an outdoor school at the Washington Park Arboretum.
Fiddleheads Family Nature School

Seattle is beginning to experiment with an unorthodox concept – outdoor preschool.

All day, all year round. Three- and 4-year-old kids would learn outside and in parks. It's more than recess – it's an outdoor classroom.

Marcie Sillman talks with Houston Chronicle energy policy reporter Jennifer Dlouhy about Shell's plans to explore Arctic oil and gas drilling this summer.

Ross Reynolds talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist with the Vancouver Sun, about the controversy around an oil spill in Vancouver's English Bay.

Flickr Photo/Laia Ros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Bill Schrier, former chief technology officer for the City of Seattle, about Tacoma's city-run internet and cable program and why the city is considering leasing it to a private company. 

Mount Rainier officials are expecting high traffic this summer along the Wonderland Trail and the various park hot spots, like Spray Park pictured here.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman talks to Tracy Swartout,  deputy superintendent of Mount Rainier National Park, about the growing popularity of the Wonderland Trail. 

Reinier Valdes, owner of the dance studio La Clave Cubana.
Courtesy of Reinier Valdes

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Reinier Valdes, owner of the dance studio La Clave Cubana, about his effort to bring Cuban dance to Seattle.

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