The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

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Flickr Photo/disordered eyes gave me this photographs (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Sometimes, birds get divorced.

“If you've had poor reproductive success with a particular mate, maybe it's better for both members of that pair to seek new mates or new territories with new mates,” said John Marzluff, a professor of forest sciences at the University of Washington. He’s the author of “Welcome to Subirdia.”

alcohol beer taps
Flickr Photo/Arvind Grover (CC BY SA 2.0)/

David Hyde talks with Fircrest resident and City Councilmember Hunter George about why he wants to end alcohol prohibition in Washington's only dry town.

Eat a chunk off the gum wall in Post Alley? Not so sure about that.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Better hurry if you want to see the famous – some might say infamous – gum wall at Seattle’s Pike Place Market, at least in its current incarnation. The market plans to scrub down the layers and layers of chewing gum stuck on the walls of Post Alley.  

Mercedes Carrabba, owner of Market Ghost Tours and Ghost Alley Espresso, told KUOW’s David Hyde that she’s excited about the scrubdown.

tip restaurant money
Flickr Photo/Eric Heath (CC BY 2.0)/

Chef Renee Erickson says she was trying to close pay gaps among her employees when she eliminated tipping at her Seattle restaurants.

But she told KUOW’s David Hyde that the change also might help battle another problem in restaurants: sexism.

Is That Wild Salmon Really Wild?

Nov 2, 2015
How do you tell what salmon is truly wild?
Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

David Hyde speaks with Mike Cenci, deputy chief law enforcement officer for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, about the dangers of seafood mislabeling and how consumers can make informed purchases. 

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Escherichia coli, grown in culture and adhered to a cover slip.
Flickr Photo/NIAID (CC BY 2.0)/

The sleuthing is under way to figure out what has sickened at least 22 people in an E. coli outbreak linked to Chipotle restaurants.

Health officials said Monday that they’re still unsure which food is responsible, but the number of cases is expected to rise beyond the 19 in Washington and three in Oregon reported so far. Seven people have been hospitalized in Washington, one in Oregon.

Ross Reynolds talks with University of California Berkeley economics professor Enrico Moretti, author of “The New Geography of Jobs,” about how the Seattle area can avoid the growing pains of a booming economy like unaffordable housing and traffic gridlock.

Moretti says improved mass transit it a key because it helps low income people get to jobs. Moretti also says Seattle’s $15 minimum wage will help mitigate the higher prices that come with growth, but he’s confident that growth will eventually lead to higher wages for everyone too.

Seattle City Council District 5 candidate Debora Juarez and Sandy Brown.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

We’ve been asking Seattle City Council candidates to answer whimsical questions.

What animal would they be? What magical power would they have? Who is their political hero?

Flickr Photo/g4ll4is (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds interviews Alex Alben, Washington state’s chief privacy officer, about a new pamphlet he's issuing today called "Privacy: A Guide for Washington Citizens."  Alben talks about all the information the state has about about you and how it's used.

Flickr Photo/Blake Burkhart (Cc-BY-NC-ND)/

Ross Reynolds speaks with David Hall, Everett's deputy city prosecutor, about the city's controversial ordinance that treats "aggressive panhandling" as a misdemeanor punishable with jail time. 

Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/

Ross Reynolds talks with Mark Hallenbeck about traffic congestion in the Puget Sound region, and what can be done to solve it. Hallenbeck is director of the Washington State Transportation Center at the University of Washington.

Sleepless in Seattle volunteers George Bargoud, Jean (no last name given), Michael Maloy and Amiga Debbie prepared to give out sleeping bags to homeless people in King County.
Courtesy of Eddie Wang

David Hyde speaks with Eddie Wang about a project to get a sleeping bag to every homeless person in King County. 

King County is trying to sell, at a discount, a large swath of land north of Fall City for a new dairy farm.
Flickr Photo/Jenny Ingram (CC BY NC ND)/

David Hyde talks with King County Executive Dow Constantine about efforts to preserve farmland and open space in rural King County.

Scientists believe that Kivalina, population 457, will be the first casualty of climate change in the U.S., and that it will be inundated by sea water by 2025.
Suzanne Tennant

Ross Reynolds talks to journalist Elizabeth Arnold about how rural Alaskan communities are dealing with fast rising tides and severe storms caused by climate change.

Seattle City Council District 3 candidates Kshama Sawant and Pamela Banks.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Pamela Banks, a candidate for Seattle’s District 3 council seat, calls her opponent "Budget Rally."