The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

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Governor Inslee fired the head of Western State Hospital Tuesday. AP reporter Martha Bellisle tells us what the new chief will have on her plate.

Also, you'll hear from two grade school Seattle sisters whose science project got them an invitation to the White House.

And the creator of a new PBS children's show tells us how his childhood growing up between Seattle and Fidalgo Island influenced his work.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Rebecca Yeung (left), and Kimberly Yeung retrieve the Loki Lego Launcher outside Ritzville, WA, after the ballooncraft returned from the stratosphere.
Courtesy of the Yeung Family

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle sisters Rebecca, 11, and Kimberly Yeung, 9, about bringing their "spacecraft," the Loki Lego Launcher, to the White House Science Fair

Before the White House, the Loki Lego Launcher was just a family project. The girls built the craft at home, with equipment and instructions they found online. They made it out of plywood, arrow shafts, rope, a helium balloon and some styrofoam feet "in the event of a water landing." 

Poet Quenton Baker
Courtesy of Helen Peppe

Elizabeth Austen talks to Seattle poet Quenton Baker about his mentor, Tim Seibles. 

A scene from 'Ready, Jet, Go!'
YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Washington native Craig Bartlett about how his childhood around Puget Sound influenced the creation of his new PBS Kids show, Ready, Jet, Go!

The Record: Tuesday, April 12, Full Show

Apr 12, 2016
Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

Yesterday we heard what's wrong at Western State Hospital -- today, we'll hear a plan to fix it.

Meanwhile, a plan to bring two Chinese pandas to Washington is getting panned by at least one pundit. 

And our state isn't the only facing education funding woes.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

KUOW's Marcie Sillman with book hugger Nancy Pearl.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "The Last Painting of Sara de Vos," a novel by Dominic Smith.  

Equal Pay Day pin
Flickr Photo/Michael Panse (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/mhQxLC

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle resident Ruchika Tulshyan, author of "The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In The Workplace," about why companies and managers should be taking the lead on closing the gender pay gap.

Trans-Alaska Pipeline, northern Brooks Range, Alaska. Rocks in the background produce oil on the North Slope.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Geological Survey (Public Domain)/https://flic.kr/p/ogvPnb

Bill Radke speaks with New York Times reporter Kirk Johnson about how the crash in oil revenues for Alaska is threatening rural schools in the state. 

Are Pandas Bad For Washington?

Apr 12, 2016
pandas
Flickr Photo/iheartpandas (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/kvuifK

David Plotz has one message for Northwest animal lovers when they consider adding pandas to their zoos in the next year: Don’t do it.

“Pandas have been duping us for a generation now,” Plotz said. “These animals don't want to survive. They're evolutionarily a dead end. They don't take care of their children. They don't breed. They eat only one food.”

The main entrance of Western State Hospital in Lakewood, Wash.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcolm talks with state Rep. Laurie Jinkins (D-Tacoma) about the problems facing Western State Hospital and why she believes adding staff and raising pay is a big part of the solution.

The Record: Monday, April 11, Full Show

Apr 11, 2016
KUOW control room studio
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Governor Inslee is calling for swift action after two men briefly escaped Western State Hospital last week. AP reporter Martha Bellisle explains why Western has been struggling lately to keep patients and staff safe.

The director of the documentary "Screenagers" tells you how to set boundaries around around your teenager's smartphone use.

And a University of Washington researcher talks about following a group of transgender kids from across America to learn how they can grow up to be as happy as their cisgender peers.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Western State Hospital in Lakewood, Washington, pictured Oct. 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks to Associated Press reporter Martha Bellisle about the recent escapes from Western State Hospital and the facility's ongoing struggle with safety concerns.

David Hyde talks to author Bryan Burrough about his book, "Days Of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence." It's about a far-left movement in the 1960s and 70s to overthrow the U.S. government in the "second American Revolution."

  Bill Radke speaks with local filmmaker Delaney Ruston about her documentary "Screenagers."

Skyler Kelly and his younger brother Luke
Courtesy of Tiffany Kelly

"I just always felt like a boy."

Nine-year-old Skyler Kelly was born a girl. But he didn't feel like a girl. From a very young age he knew he was supposed to be a boy. He can't explain how he knew. He just felt like a boy. 

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