The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about the ideas that matter most to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

What's a conversation we should be having on KUOW? Tell us! Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

Seattle skyline
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks to Zaki Hamid, a program director for Humanities Washington, about why he calls Seattle home and what has kept him here. And we  take calls from listeners who share their stories of how they make it work in the changing region. 

A toll area on Interstate 405.
Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ruiWYC

Bill Radke talks to Ed Barry, the Toll Division Director with the Washington State Department of Transportation, about a new report (PDF) that recommends raising the price of the top toll on Interstate 405 past $10.

It was one of a series of recommendations to keep traffic flowing on the busy corridor.  WSDOT has also conducted a study analyzing the effectiveness of I-405 tolling as the population in the region continues to grow. 

The Seattle skyline, seen across the water.
Flickr Photo/Shelly Provost (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/VEhbc2

Essayist Elissa Washuta spent last summer in the Fremont Bridge. The old control room was turned into an office, which allowed her to sit over the water and write. Elissa is descended from the Cowlitz and Cascade people. The longer she looked at the shipping canal, the less she could separate it from the displacement of the Duwamish people in service of progress and growth.

Seattle is in a new wave of growth, with similar implications for those who were here before, including the Coast Salish peoples. On a visit back to Seattle from Columbus, Ohio, Elissa joined Bill Radke for a conversation on the flow of water – and people – in and out of this city.

Adra Boo and Jen Petersen talk about leaving and staying in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Jen Petersen and Adra Boo about their respective decisions to leave Seattle (and the United States) and stay in the Puget Sound region. They reflect on what's changed and what hasn't and whether Seattle is living up to its progressive ideals. 

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, center, looks at election returns with staff during an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala.
AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Harvey Weinstein, Louis C.K., Charlie Rose, and others were swiftly fired after allegations against them broke. But Roy Moore came within 1.5 percent of being elected to the U.S. Senate. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is still on the bench. And Donald Trump is still in the White House, as was Bill Clinton following his own transgressions.

When it comes to claims of sexual misconduct, why are media figures being held to a higher standard than public officials?

The Record: Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Dec 13, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Deep red Alabama just elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. Are Republicans in trouble? We'll ask Washington State Republican Party chairman Susan Hutchison and NPR's Scott Detrow.

Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Laura Kipnis, author of the book "Unwanted Advances," and Ijeoma Oluo, Seattle writer and editor at large of the Establishment, about  power, behavior and how you change the culture around sexual harassment. 

The Record: Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Dec 12, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

We've seen men accused of sexual harassment, men apologizing, men denying and men being fired. What could women do besides report their behavior? And should we even be asking? We'll talk with Northwestern University professor Laura Kipnis and Ijeoma Oluo, editor-at-large for The Establishment.

Early improvisational greats Elaine May and Mike Nichols.
Wikimedia

According to author Sam Wasson, it is. He sat down with Bill Radke to talk about his new book, "Improv Nation." The book explores what Wasson calls a great American art. Improv was founded by a social worker named Viola Spolin, who used it to help connect immigrant kids who didn’t share a language or culture. From there it gave us Nichols and May, Second City, and the early careers of many comic luminaries.

Cranberries make up a huge part of Pacific County's economy. The industry's workforce is being disrupted by immigration arrests and deportations.
Flickr Photo/Holly Ladd (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/5ypHND

Last month, Seattle Times reporter Nina Shapiro wrote a story about how immigrant neighbors were disappearing from Long Beach, a town in southwest Washington’s Pacific County. People were being detained and deported by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, often without ICE notifying law enforcement in the town.

A week after her story came out, Shapiro got a call saying an immigrant source she'd quoted anonymously had been arrested by immigration agents. When they picked him up, they said, “You’re the one from the newspaper.” Nina joined Bill Radke for a conversation about the hazards of immigration reporting in the age of Donald Trump.

Pioneer Square apartment listed at $130/night on Airbnb.
Courtesy of Airbnb

The Seattle City Council unanimously approved regulations Monday to limit short term rentals like Airbnb, after more than a year working out concerns from that and similar companies.

Under the new ordinance, most people will be allowed to operate two rental units max.

Some of the microaggressions noted by KUOW listeners.
KUOW Illustration

On the night of Dr. Roberto Montenegro’s dissertation defense celebration, he went out to dinner at a fancy restaurant with his wife and colleagues. He felt like he was on top of the world at the end of the night.

Until, as he stood in line waiting to claim his car from the valet stand, a woman walked up and handed him her keys. She assumed that because he was Latino, he was there to park her car.

The Record: Monday, December 11, 2017

Dec 11, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Dan Rather no longer anchors the CBS Evening News, but he's got plenty of viewers of his News and Guts news blog. Dan Rather is in the studio to give you his big picture take on how America's doing today. His new book is "What Unites Us."

Reporter, broadcaster, and author Dan Rather in the KUOW studios on December 8, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer


Dan Rather knows exactly what question he’d ask President Donald Trump in an interview: What are you so afraid of?

Rather told Bill Radke he’d start this way: “Mr. President, of what are you afraid? You have indicated by word and deed that you are very afraid of something."

The Record: Thursday, December 7, 2017

Dec 7, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

A Seattle Times investigation reveals that a Washington state legislator and CWU professor was accused of sexually harassing his students on more than one occasion. We'll talk with Mike Baker, who broke the story for the Times.

present gift wrapped
Flickr Photo/Plastic_Bat (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7m9UP1

This holiday season, let's all try to avoid being like Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout.

Remember her? The famed profligate from the Shel Silverstein poem who refused to take the garbage out? Let us refresh your memory.

The Record: Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Dec 6, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

A group of US Congress members including Senator Patty Murray and Senator Maria Cantwell say it's time for Al Franken to leave Congress because he's been accused by several women of sexual harassment. Would his resignation help? And what would help even more?

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole, left, and Deputy Chief Carmen Best listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to state Representative Morgan Irwin and Michele Storms, Deputy Director of the ACLU of Washington about what they hope to see in the next Seattle police chief. 

Portrait of Mary Elizabeth Bowser, Union spy in the home of Jefferson Davis.
Courtesy of Melinda Mueller

Bill Radke talks with poetry correspondent Elizabeth Austen about Seattle-based poet and science teacher Melinda Mueller’s poem “Covert Acts.”

The three-part poem is set in the American Civil War, and illuminates the lives of Union soldier Private Mary Galloway, field surgeon Mary Edwards Walker, and freedwoman and Union spy Mary Bowser — three women who defied the constraints of their time.

The Record: Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Dec 5, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Results are in, and Washington state's voter turnout in this last election was at an all-time low. Why don't we vote? We ask political science professor Christopher Mann of Skidmore College whether there's anything we should be doing differently.

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The election results were just certified -- and voter turnout was a historically low 37.1%. That shatters the previous low... of 38.5%, in the 2015 election. We went to vote by mail in 2011 to increase turnout. What gives? To find out, Bill Radke spoke with Christopher Mann, associate political science professor at Skidmore. Tl;dr? As its voting rate declines, Washington has lots of company across established democracies. Mann also mentions local media as one potential way to stop the slide.

Kristin Leong, creator of the Roll Call Project and Christina Joo, junior at International School in Bellevue
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks with Kristin Leong and Christina Joo about finding common ground between students and teachers.

Leong is a former middle school teacher and founder of the Roll Call Project, which asks students and teachers to think about what they have in common, and why it matters. Joo is a junior at International School in Bellevue, and a participant in the project.

The Record: Monday, December 4, 2017

Dec 4, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

We'll hear about the power and potential of virtual reality, from one of its pioneers. Jaron Lanier is in the studio. He's the author of the new book "Dawn of the New Everything."

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole, left, and Deputy Chief Carmen Best listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Kirsten Harris-Talley, former Seattle City Councilmember about what she hopes to see in the next police chief of the Seattle Police Department. 

Are you sure you're handing your keys to the valet?
Flickr Photo/Caitlin Regan (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/6AB68e

On the night of Dr. Roberto Montenegro’s dissertation defense celebration, he was at a fancy restaurant and feeling on top of the world — until a woman bypassed the valet stand and handed him her keys.

Bill Radke talks to the New York Times' Gender Editor Jessica Bennett about the fact that so many of the high-profile men who have been accused of workplace sexual harassment and assault also decided what stories we all had access to, from movies and TV to news coverage. Bennett has been writing about this in her newsletter for the NYT, The #MeTooMoment.  

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

You will laugh, you will cry, but you will mostly laugh along with actors Jane Lynch and Kate Flannery as they talk with Bill Radke about the Christmas songs we love and love to hate.

Bill Radke sits down with Kevin Young, archivist at the New York Public Library and author of the new book "Bunk." The book is a catalog of hoaxes, plagiarism and flimflam of all stripes. Young argues that there’s something uniquely American about hoaxes.

Author Isabel Allende in the KUOW studios on Tuesday, November 28th.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Isabel Allende’s history with Seattle began  with a dress. It looked like a butterfly, she lovingly remembered, and she flew all the way back to the city to try it on. “And I looked terrible. I looked like an extra in the Cirque du Soleil,” she laughed. She brought that sense of humor back to Seattle for a conversation with Bill Radke following the publication of her latest book, "In the Midst of Winter."

Supporters and protestors clash during a pro-Trump rally at Westlake Plaza in downtown Seattle on Monday, May 1, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Bill Radke talks to Judy Giesberg, history professor at Villanova University and editor of Journal of the Civil War Era, and David Blight, history professor at Yale University, about the Civil War and whether today's political climate, while divided, is anywhere near the brink of another war.  

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