The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

Subscribe to The Record podcast:

Individual stories | Full hour

Follow @KUOW and #KUOWrecord to join our daily discussion on Twitter. You can also send questions and comments to record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

Author Alex Soojung-Kim Pang has spent years studying people, technology and how devices have invaded our lives. In his book, "The Distraction Addiction," he explains how overusing technology is "destroying our souls." Ross Reynolds talks with Pang about how people can be more mindful with their technology.

Washington state’s Health Benefit Exchange officially opens for enrollment October 1. Last month, state Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler approved plans from only four insurance companies. But last week, following negotiations with several insurance companies, Kreidler doubled that number. In total, 46 individual insurance plans from eight different companies will be available on the marketplace.

What will more choices mean for consumers seeking health coverage? Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler talked with Ross Reynolds.

Should Kids Get Lawyers?

Sep 10, 2013
law court crime
Flickr Photo/Joe Gratz (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/bkUna

In Washington state, children in dependency cases where parental rights have been terminated are not provided legal representation. That's not the case in other states. In Massachusetts, kids have the right to legal representation at birth.

 

Critics of Washington's policy contend that children have legal interests too, and without a lawyer, those interests are not protected. Some supporters argue that children are not in a position to articulate their best interests or direct a lawyer to represent them.

 

Marcie Sillman sits down with two attorneys, Lisa Kelly, director of the University of Washington's Children and Youth Advocacy Clinic, and Catherine Smith, from Smith Goodfriend, P.S., for two perspectives on this issue. 

Flickr Photo/Chris Martino

Salmonella is not just in poultry anymore; it's in our spices. In a recent study of more than 20,000 food shipments, the United States Food and Drug Administration found that nearly 7 percent of spice lots were contaminated with salmonella. That's twice the average of all other imported foods. Oregano, basil, cumin and black pepper are just some of the spices where salmonella contamination was found.

Marcie Sillman talks with FDA spokeswoman Shelly Burgess about the study. Burgess recommends adding spices to your food during the cooking process which will kill the salmonella bacteria and to follow basic food safety procedures.

The Pierce County jail is facing a hefty 8 percent budget shortfall. So far, 30 jobs are slated to be lost and two jail units, which can house more than 160 inmates, are set to close. Officials say even with these reductions, the budget crises will not be fixed.

Ross Reynolds talks with Pierce County Sheriff Paul Pastor about how these cuts will affect the jail and public safety.

Jamie Ford's book "Songs of Willow Frost."

Jamie Ford’s debut novel was a sensation: "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” was the story of a Chinese-American boy who falls for a Japanese-American girl.  Unfortunately, their love affair was stymied by World War II and the girl’s internment in Minidoka, Idaho.

Ford follows his bestselling novel with another book that comes out of Asian-American history.  “Songs of Willow Frost” is the story of a Chinese-American girl forced to give up her young son to an orphanage when the Depression hits. Ford says the book was inspired by his own family history. He spoke with Marcie Sillman today.

AP Photo/J Pat Carter

A Seattle open-water swimmer is questioning whether Diana Nyad really swam to Florida on her own.

Flickr Photo/Wojtek Ogrodowczyk

Congress reconvenes today, and at the top of their agenda is deciding whether to sanction President Obama’s proposal to launch military attacks on Syria. Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is denying the use of chemical weapons on civilians by his government. The situation in Syria has changed significantly since 2011 when protesters took to the streets of Damascus. Over one million children are living in refugee camps outside of the country and two million are internally displaced.

Kenneth Pollack is a senior fellow at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution and the author of the book “Unthinkable: Iran, the Bomb, and American Strategy.” He talked with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman about the Syrian government, its relationship to the United States and its position in the Middle East.

Flickr Photo/Jonathon Colman

Congress is back in session this week, and Syria is at the top of the agenda. That means other business like immigration reform and the debt ceiling moves to the back burner. Why can’t Congress do two things at once? Marcie Sillman and Ross Reynolds talk with Andrea Seabrook of DecodeDC.

The Army That's Running Hotels

Sep 9, 2013
Flickr Photo/James Gordon

In 2009, the Sri Lankan Army brutally crushed a separatist group known as the Tamil Tigers. That same army is now in the hospitality business. Without a separatist group to fight anymore, the Sri Lankan Army is converting some of their assets into hotels and resorts. Journalist Brendan Brady stayed in one of the hotels. Ross Reynolds talks with Brady about the Sri Lankan Army's surprising new venture. 

Flickr Photo/OregonDOT

Studies upon studies have exposed the dangers of texting and driving. Some go so far as to say texting is worse than drinking and driving. Renowned director Werner Herzog even made a film about it.

Yet a new University of Washington study shows that one in 12 drivers in Washington state are still using cellphones or other electronic devices on the road, and half of those using their devices are texting.

Ross Reynolds talks with Beth Ebel, the study's principal investigator and trauma doctor in the Injury Prevention and Research Center at Harborview, about her findings.

Congress returned to Washington, D.C., today with Syria at the forefront of its agenda. Lawmakers will debate a resolution on military intervention against Syria for allegedly using chemical weapons.

To take a step back, Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Raymond Zilinskas, director of the Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies about chemical weapons — what they are and why they are considered a different class than conventional weapons. 

The new documentary Muscle Shoals recalls how interracial harmony in tumultuous times made possible a new kind of music. Leading African-American artists traveled to North Alabama — not exactly a place they thought they'd be welcome in the civil rights era — to jam with an all-white crew of session players. In little rooms near the wide Tennessee River, they perfected soul and anticipated Southern rock.

KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Seattle is a city full of icons. Visitors stop to gawk at the Space Needle. They marvel as Pike Place Market fishmongers blithely toss a fresh salmon to one another as the crowd cheers them on. And they trek to a dead end street in the Fremont neighborhood to pay homage to a homely gray cement sculpture.

This is the Fremont Troll, and he's been a hulking presence under Highway 99 for the past 23 years. Co-creator Steve Badanes, a University of Washington architecture professor, and two of his students submitted the idea for the troll in 1990. The Fremont Arts Council was holding a contest to create an artwork for this street end. A panel of judges would pick three finalists, then the public would vote at a booth at that year's Fremont Solstice Festival.

Flickr Photo/sunshine.patchoulli

The 2013 NFL season kicked off on Thursday night. The Seattle Seahawks hope to pick up where they left off last year with a road game against the Carolina Panthers on Sunday. And if you believe the hype, they have a chance to go all the way to the Super Bowl this year. Sportswriter Seth Kolloen gives us a preview.

Pages