The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Ways to Connect

school classroom education
Flickr Photo/KT King (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8oTq2a

Bill Radke talks to Governor Jay Inslee about his proposal to raise teacher salaries in Washington state as a way of dealing with the teacher shortage. 

Canada's Great Bear Rainforest.
Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ubjonq

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new deal to protect millions of acres of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia.

Purple Heart
Flickr Photo/Phil Renaud (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ex7KSS

Bill Radke speaks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the resignation of Rep. Graham Hunt after allegations that the Washington state lawmaker exaggerated his military service record.

Also, Radke talks with Doug Sterner, a veteran who has spent decades investigating fraudulent claims of military service, for his take on why people distort, exaggerate, or lie about military service.

Vancouver, B.C,
Flickr Photo/Cliff Hellis (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dxchD5

Bill Radke talks with CBC Radio pop culture columnist Kim Linekin about how The X-Files helped turn Vancouver, B.C. into a thriving hub for TV and film productions.

Washington state's fourth poet laureate Tod Marshall.
Gonzaga University

If you want to be Washington State’s poet laureate, you have to apply for the job, the same way you’d apply to be a teacher or a bookkeeper.

The Record: Tuesday, Feb. 2, Full Show

Feb 2, 2016
KUOW Photo

Seattle's bike share program isn't doing so well. Should we kill it or expand it?

And Seattle businesses, is it now acceptable to fire your employees by text?

Also, how much do you fear Ted Cruz or Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton or  [insert your presidential nemesis here] getting elected. Would you move to Canada? You'll meet someone who did.

You'll also hear commentary throughout the show from Luke Burbank, host of Live Wire Radio

Listen to the full show or check out the individual stories:

Donald Trump is coming to Lynden, Wash.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks with Ralph Munro, Washington's former Secretary of State, about why he's distributing bumper stickers that say "Dump Trump." Munro is giving them away for free to anyone who wants one.

Google self driving car at the Computer History Museum.
Flickr Photo/Don DeBold (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o7T6qb

In five years, self-driving cars will be on the road.

Let that sink in.

Nancy Pearl said you'll learn more than you ever thought possible about mules from this week's reading picks.
Flickr Photo/Greg Westfall (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sS617i

When KUOW listeners are at a loss for what book to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the person picking up the phone is "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Pearl and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a history buff in Seabeck, Washington who loved Bernard DeVoto's "The Journals of Lewis and Clark."

Pearl recommends "The Oregon Trail" by Rinker Buck and another title by DeVoto, "Across the Wide Missouri."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll see if Seattle's favorite librarian can guide you to your next book.

The Slants
Courtesy The Slants

In 2007 Portland bassist Simon Tam wanted to start a band that celebrates his Asian heritage, and he wanted a name that captured that pride and at the same time takes back a common racial slur.

The Record: Monday, Feb 1, Full Show

Feb 1, 2016
Inside the KUOW control room.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Today on The Record: We talk a lot about homelessness, hear from someone who's lived without reliable shelter for three years. An Asian-American rock and roller will tell you why he fought to trademark his band's possibly offensive name. And the survivor of a murderous Seattle break-in talks about how she's come to feel about having her name forever connected to that attack.

Listen to the full show above, or check out the individual stories:

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room in 2014.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

Bill Radke speaks with Eli Sanders, Pulitzer-prize winning author of "While The City Slept," about the attack on a hot summer night that changed three Seattle lives forever. On July 19, 2009, Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Jennifer Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Also, Katy Sewall talks to Hopper about how she feels about having her name forever connected to that attack. For more from Hopper, check out another interview she did with KUOW in 2014. 

Eli Sanders and Jennifer Hopper will join KUOW's Marcie Sillman in conversation at Town Hall Seattle on Wednesday, Feb. 3 at 7:30 pm. More information on the event can be found here.

A construction crane working on a building is shown with Port of Seattle cranes in the background on a foggy summer day, Monday, July 15, 2014, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why some people see a recession coming our way and what that could mean for the Seattle boom.

Michael Shiosaki and Mayor Ed Murray at a 'StoryCorps' booth in Seattle.
Courtesy of StoryCorps

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and his husband  Michael Shiosaki recount how their relationship parallels the many changes in the laws on same-sex couples. 

Murray decided to run for an office in the state legislature because a good friend asked him to do it: Washington's first openly gay politican, Cal Anderson. At a StoryCorps booth in Seattle's New Holly neighborhood, Murray and Shiosaki talked about making the decision to enter public life.  

Lisa Sawyer selling Real Change downtown.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

We meet Lisa Sawyer on the corner of 4th and Union in downtown Seattle. That’s where she sells the Real Change street paper every day.

Sawyer wears a Seahawks beanie, puffy coat, no makeup, loose pants and tennis shoes (she says she sometimes wears heels while selling the paper but her feet are so sore by the end of the day that she prefers her runners). It's been a while since she washed her hair. 

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