The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

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Wendy Boglioli won bronze in the Women's 100 metres Butterfly and gold in the Women's 4 × 100 metres Freestyle Relay at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Bill Radke speaks with swimmer Wendy Boglioli about facing off against the East German women's swimming team at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

The massively powerful East German swimmers, who were later found to have been systematically doped by their government, took gold after gold in event after event. The Americans were entirely shut out -- until the last race. 

U.S. swimmer Wendy Boglioli dives in to the pool to begin the second heat in the women's 100 meter butterfly competition at the Olympic pool in Montreal, Canada, July 21, 1976.
AP Photo/Harry Cabluck

At the summer Olympics, 19-year-old American swimmer Lilly King is making headlines – and not just for winning gold.

After beating Russian swimmer Yulia Efimova, King openly condemned the Russian swim team for doping.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about how Canadians are reacting to Trump's run for the presidency. One worry is that if Trump wins the White House it will mean an end to NAFTA. 

Kate Riley's son has autism and has trouble with responding quickly to directions, a concern when dealing with police.
Courtesy of Kate Riley

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Riley, Seattle Times editorial page editor, about her recent article that explains why she worries about interactions between her autistic son and law enforcement. 

AR-15 rifle with a Stag lower receiver California legal (only with fixed 10-round magazine)
Wikimedia Commons

The day after the Orlando nightclub shooting, Tami Michaels, a Seattle talk show host, took to Facebook.

Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

Today we'll discuss the Seattle business owner who raised his employees’ wages to $70,000 an hour. Is he as selfless as he seemed and why does that matter?

Also, you'll find out what happened when some Seattleites put Black Lives Matter signs in their yards.

And you'll meet a Bellevue Muslim who is all in for Donald Trump.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "The Last Samurai" by Helen DeWitt.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Heidi Groover of The Stranger about a new law Seattle City Council passed unanimously Monday targeting housing discrimination.

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Rodrick about why he decided to profile Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price for Esquire magazine and what he learned. Price made headlines when he slashed his own million dollar salary to raise the salary of all his employees to $70,000 a year. 

Washington delegate Hossein Khorram is a supporter of Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Hossein Khorram about why he continues to support Donald Trump, despite other Republicans in the region backing out of a Trump fundraiser planned for the Seattle area later this month. 

Former U.S. Ambassador to China Gary Locke in 2012.
Flickr Photo/Linda Cotton (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1PltfoZ

Bill Radke talks to Lee Fang, an investigative reporter for The Intercept about the four part investigation he co-wrote that details foreign investment in U.S. politics, including the relationship between former Washington state governor and former U.S. ambassador to China Gary Locke and the Chinese family that runs APIC

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large about a group of white Seattleites who have been going door-to-door asking neighbors to put Black Lives Matter signs in their yards. Hear about the reactions they got and how Large's readers reacted to his coverage. 

The Record: Monday, August 8, full show

Aug 8, 2016
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Why are trees dying in Seattle parks and what does it mean for our environment and your yard?

Also, the University of Washington professor who helped bring you a realistic looking "Finding Nemo" is scanning every kind of fish to see what we can learn.

And Apple is getting better at machine learning by buying a Seattle company.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Reagan Jackson, an artist and teacher, didn't think she would participate in a 'Reparations' experiment that started in Seattle.
Michael Maine

Artist Reagan Jackson submitted a request to Seattle’s Reparations project. She explained why in this transcribed interview with KUOW's Bill Radke: 

Our country is like a war-torn nation.


The Japanese Garden in the Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/GD Taber (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8s5xjo

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes about Seattle trees, why they're dying and what that tells us about the state of the environment. 

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