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The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about the ideas that matter most to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

What's a conversation we should be having on KUOW? Tell us! Our email address is

Ways to Connect

The yes light is on.
Flickr Photo/Jeremy Brooks (CC BY 2.0)/

University of Washington sociologist Pepper Schwartz says the takeaway from the allegations against Aziz Ansari is that we should talk about sex before having it. She sat down with Bill Radke to discuss why that is and some of the social programming that gets in the way.

The Record: Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Feb 6, 2018

A group of West Seattle homeowners who had city-owned trees cut down to open up their views have reached a settlement. Is it enough to punish and deter? And should we read their names on the air? Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Lisa Herbold.

Closeup of a peacock feather.
Flickr Photo/Gary Riley (CC BY 2.0)/

Last week's viral story of an ersatz emotional support peacock sent waves of hilarity ricocheting across the internet and late night talk shows. But The New York Times' David Leonhardt argues that the creeping normalization of little lies - such as falsehoods about our pets being support or service animals - has a corrosive effect on society over time. Was Dexter the peacock in the coal mine? Bill Radke spoke with Leonhardt to find out.

The Record: Monday, February 5, 2018

Feb 5, 2018

State lawmakers are halfway through their session. KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins tells us what this year's Democrat-controlled legislature is doing for Democrats.

KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

More women are speaking out about sexual abuse and harassment as part of the renewed #MeToo movement.

But for the women picking the fruits and vegetables we buy at local supermarkets, talking about daily abuse isn’t easy.

Washington state poets laureate Claudia Castro Luna and Tod Marshall.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

When you're the poet laureate of Washington state, you log a lot of time on the road. "I got a new car for the job," laughs Tod Marshall. It came to him with 12,000 miles on it, and is now hovering around 57,000 as he hangs up his traveling hat.

The Record: Thursday, February 1, 2018

Feb 1, 2018

The Seattle Times has published emails and text messages that give an idea how child sex abuse allegations against former Mayor Ed Murray played out behind the scenes in city government. We'll get the story from reporter Lewis Kamb.

Dexter the peacock did not get to fly the friendly skies.
Photo courtesy Dexter the Peacock via Instagram screenshot/

This week a woman and her peacock were turned away from a cross-country flight. She'd pleaded that Dexter was an emotional support animal, to no avail. And now the most regal road movie in existence is taking place as the pair drives to Los Angeles instead. But sneaking untrained animals onto planes and into restaurants is no snickering matter, and could soon be subject to civil penalties in Washington state.

The Record: Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Jan 31, 2018

We'll catch you up on some ideas coming from your state lawmakers, including fining people who try to fake having an emotional support animal to get their dog into restaurants and hotels, and making Sasquatch the official state cryptid (that's a creature whose existence has not been proven or disproven by science) in order to raise money for state parks by selling sweet custom 'Squatch license plates.

Today on The Record we're looking at the #MeToo and Time's Up movements here in Washington state. How did we get here and what we can do next?

'The Legend of Bigfoot' is a store along Highway 101 in northern California.
Flickr Photo/Amit Patel (CC BY 2.0)/

Bigfoot might not be real, but he's a heck of a fundraiser. We are forever fascinated with that critter and now a Washington state senator wants to harness that fascination to help maintain Washington state parks. 

Amazon Spheres, downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

If you've driven through South Lake Union in the last seven years, you have probably seen the structures emerge. Three round orbs made of steel and glass were filled with 40,000 plants from nearly 30 different countries to create an urban rainforest. 

The Record: Monday, January 29, 2018

Jan 29, 2018

When you think Seattle landmark, you think Space Needle, right? But could you eventually think of the new Amazon Spheres? We'll discuss with The Stranger's Charles Mudede and architect and FORM magazine publisher Ann Gray.

Seattle Emeralds, Seattle Eagles and yes, Seattle Kraken are only a few of the newly registered domain names that could hold clues about what a possible Seattle NHL team might be called. Bill Radke bounces some possibilities off VanLive reporter (and Canucks fan) Harrison Mooney.

Patricia Murphy / KUOW

Is Washington state going to put an end to capital punishment?

The death penalty has been on hold since 2014 when Governor Inslee declared a moratorium on executions.

Hear an update on what lawmakers are up to from Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins. 

First, KUOW's Patricia Murphy was a media witness at the execution of the last person to put to death by the state.

The Record: Thursday, January 25, 2018

Jan 25, 2018
Megan Farmer / KUOW

The state of Washington might be about to abolish the death penalty. We'll get the latest and we'll talk to a reporter who witnessed the last state execution.

Also, a University of Washington doctor has a way for you to decide now what medical interventions you want should you develop Alzheimer's.

And should Edgar Martinez be in the Baseball Hall of Fame? We think Seattle knows the answer, but we've got to go outside the Safeco bubble for this one.  

Casey Martin / KUOW

What kind of medical care would you want if you had Alzheimer's -- or dementia?

That's an uncomfortable question -- but you might be better off answering it now before dementia comes on.

Flickr Photo/ Carol Munro (CC BY-NC 2.0)/

In the early, early hours of Tuesday morning phones lit up along the Washington coast alerting to the possibility of a tsunami. A 7.9 magnitude earthquake had just hit in the Gulf of Alaska.

The things is, not ALL the phones on the WA coast lit up. And as for that alert, it said there was a tsunami "watch" not a warning. Some people evacuated, some people didn't know whether they should.

This exposes a lot of questions about how ready we are for the big waves. The Seattle Times' science reporter Sandi Doughton explains what was learned after this latest tsunami warning.

The Record: Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Jan 24, 2018

When a magnitude 7.9 earthquake hit Alaska earlier this week, it triggered a tsunami alert for the Washington coast. People got advisories on their phone, but a) it was the middle of the night, who's on their phone? and b) what are you supposed do in a tsunami watch? Evacuate, or wait? Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton helps answer questions about how ready we are for big waves.

Mortician Caitlin Doughty, with some tools of the trade.
Photo by Jeff Minton.

Let’s talk about death.

No, seriously. It’s time we all had a conversation with our loved ones about dying.

Author Ijeoma Oluo.
Photo by Nikki Closser, with permission of the author.

So, you want to talk about race.

But... do you? Reallllly? 

For most people, the real answer is no. 

Flickr Photo/Alex Holzknecht (CC BY 2.0)/

Seattle was recently named the most "hygge" city in the United States. Hygge is a way of life that has been imported from Denmark. It essentially means coziness.

To combat the long, dark nights of winter, a hygge practice would include lighting your fireplace, filling a room with candles, reading cuddled up in a blanket, spending time with friends, drinking lots of wine and eating lots of cake.

The Record: Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Jan 23, 2018

So you want to talk about race. (You do want to talk about race, right?) Even if the person you're talking to is oblivious, or defensive? Or maybe you're oblivious and defensive? Writer Ijeoma Oluo stops by for a conversation about how we can make the race talk more doable, more productive and more hopeful.

Statue in the Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa, Italy.
Flickr Photo/Alexander Edward (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Matt Calkins was in junior high when he first started feeling intense social anxiety.

"I remember I would go on high school debate trips and I wouldn't say a word for like three days until I was actually debating," he said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record.

Mary Haddish, 14, left, shops with her father, Daniel Ghebre at Amazon Go on Monday, January 22, 2018, on 7th Ave., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Nobody likes to wait in line. So today, Amazon removed that unpleasantness from the neighborhood grocery store. At Amazon Go, you walk in, pick up your groceries and walk out.

Dancer Jon Boogz.
Photo courtesy of Marcie Sillman/

One of them went viral in a collaboration with Yo Yo Ma; the other played Michael Jackson for the Cirque du Soleil. But you might know dancers Lil Buck and Jon Boogz best for their collaboration on the haunting video Color of Reality.

The Record: Monday, January 22, 2018

Jan 22, 2018

Amazon just opened a grocery store with no checkout lines — not even self-checkout scanners, you just grab your stuff and walk out. What will that convenience cost you? We talk with Geekwire's Todd Bishop and University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo about Amazon Go.

FLICKR PHOTO/sunrisesoup (CC BY 2.0)/

So Amazon won't be building HQ2 in Seattle. Honestly, it was a long shot. But where the company's second headquarters and its 100,000 jobs will go is still anybody's guess. Bill Radke talks with KUOW's Carolyn Adolph and Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the 20 cities that still have a shot.

Amtrak 188 derailed in Philadelphia on May 12, 2015, killing 8 and injuring more than 200.
Flickr Photo/Jack Snell (CC BY 2.0)/

Josh Gotbaum is used to helping people. He worked on disaster relief efforts in the Clinton administration, helped bring Hawaiian Airlines back from bankruptcy, and served as founding CEO of The September 11th Fund. But on May 12th, 2015, the helper became the helped when the train he was on came off the tracks.  

The Record: Thursday, January 18, 2018

Jan 18, 2018

On today's show we get local reaction to the hint Amazon has given us as to which city will be their new second headquarters.

Also, Amtrak promises to pay for the fatal derailment near Tacoma. They'll pay medical expenses and cleanup. But a man who was on a derailed Amtrak train three years ago says our local victims are in for a rude awakening.

And should Seattle get rid of on-street parking downtown to make room for dedicated bus lanes so buses become fast, so you won't want a car, so you won't need parking?