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'Heart's Home': Finding Shelter From Twisp Fire Amid Last Year's Wreckage

Aug 25, 2015
A wildfire burns behind a home on Twisp River Road early Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015 in Twisp, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When wildfire blazed through Meg Donohue’s property on Texas Creek last year, only a small cabin remained standing. It became a refuge last week when flames forced her to flee her new home 10 miles away in Twisp.

Donohue, owner of Blue Star Coffee Roasters, told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on Tuesday that her return to Texas Creek was bittersweet.

Tomatoes at Queen Anne Farmers Market.
Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes to the Queen Anne Farmers Market to talk with cook, author and chef Becky Selengut about what's fresh for your table. Hear a simple recipe for using delicious tomatoes. Selengut's books include Good Fish and Shroom: Mind-Bendingly Good Recipes for Cultivated and Wild Mushrooms.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Nancy Pearl was born in Detroit. She tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman that first-time novelist Angela Flournoy gets the city just right in her book, "The Turner House." It traces the history of a family through the civil rights era and beyond in a struggling city.  

Misty Upham arrives for a screening at the Cannes film festival in Cannes, France, on May 17, 2013.
Todd Williamson/Invision/AP, File

Native American actress Misty Upham had an impressive resume, having appeared on screen with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in the film "August: Osage County," and with Benicio del Toro in "Jimmy P." But her personal life was in stark contrast to her Hollywood dream.

In October 2014, Upham was living in Auburn with her parents when she went missing. A recent investigative report on the disappearance by Kristen Millares Young for The Guardian found the Auburn police did very little to help find her.

Firefighters from Salem, Oregon, mop up hotspots on Judy Doran McBride's ranch near Twisp this weekend.
Courtesy Judy Doran McBride

Wildfire was roaring toward their 640-acre ranch near Twisp, but Judy Doran McBride and her husband stood their ground.

“If the fire comes our way, we’re going to stay and defend our home,” McBride told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

This photo at the Nordic Heritage Museum exhibit shows Ivar Haglund 'surrounded by acres of clams,' a reference to his resaturant theme song.
Courtesy of Ivar’s

Think of a simpler Seattle in 1938: No Jeff Bezos, no Bill Gates, no dawn to dusk traffic jams. Instead there was Ivar Haglund, restaurateur and showman with a penchant for the preposterous.

Knute Berger told KUOW’s David Hyde that a new exhibit at the Nordic Heritage Museum tells Ivar’s story. It’s “part of that Northwest sensibility that leads you to grunge, leads you to … who wants to be New York? You know, we came here for other reasons,” Berger said. “And he really got that.”

Ross Reynolds speaks with Patrice Demombynes, a long-time friend of artist Rolon Bert Garner and the owner of the Virginia Inn. Garner died on  Aug. 17. He had a big impact on the Seattle art scene during his life. 

Ross Reynolds interviews Larry Gossett and Bob Santos, two members of Seattle’s "Gang of Four." In the social turmoil of the 1960s and 70s, four Seattle political activists came of age: Roberto Maestas from the Latino community, Native American activist Bernie Whitebear , Bob Santos of the Asian community, and African American leader Larry Gossett.

Santos is the co-author of “Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Alex Hymer, co-owner of Sweet River Bakery in Pateros, Washington. The bakery is about an hour south of Winthrop and Twisp, and has been serving up caffeine and internet access to wildfire evacuees from the two towns.

Flames and smoke rise on a hillside above Twisp River Road near Twisp, Wash., Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

“Everything is tapped out.”

Those were the not-so-reassuring words of Peter Goldmark, Washington state lands commissioner. He spoke Thursday with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, the day after three firefighters were killed in a wildfire near Twisp.

Masooma, pictured with her children, recounted the events of pre-dawn March 11, 2012 when she says a U.S. soldier rampaged through two villages killing 16 people, mostly children. Staff Sergeant Robert Bales pleaded guilty to the massacre.
AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Adam Ashton, military reporter for the Tacoma News Tribune, about Sgt. Robert Bales and how the military evaluates the mental health of their troops. A new report from the military shows Bales exhibited warning signs of potentially violent behavior before killing 16 Afghan civilians in 2012.

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times reporter Will Drabold about his investigation into the Department of Social and Health Services which revealed issues in staffing and funding that put Washington kids at risk. 

Roger Shimomura's "American in Disguise"
Courtesy Tacoma Art Museum

Roger Shimomura wasn't even three years old when he and his family were sent to the Puyallup Assembly Center in 1942. He celebrated his third birthday there.

That's one of his earliest memories.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about wildfire season in British Columbia. 

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

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