The Record

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There’s a line in “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” by Maria Semple, that triggers pained recognition among locals.

“The drivers here are horrible,” she begins. “They’re the slowest drivers you ever saw.”

The Record: Monday, Oct 10th, Full Show

Oct 10, 2016
KUOW Photo

New York Times columnist Tim Egan reviews the presidential debate and the state of this election year. Maria Semple talks about her new book, "Today Will Be Different." We'll talk about the importance of Indigenous People's Day. And finally, should a  failed experiment with homeless camping in Portland make its way to Seattle?

Matt Remle drafted the resolution adopted by the Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing negative consequences of the American Indian boarding schools
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Monday is Seattle's third annual celebration of Indigenous People's Day. We asked members of our local indigenous community to share what it means to them. 

Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood in Portland, Oregon.
Flickr Photo/Dan (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter Amelia Templeton about Portland's failed experiment to allow homeless individuals to camp on public land. The Seattle City Council is considering a similar proposal. 

Bill Radke speaks with Kyle Murphy and Ellicott Dandy about Initiative 732, which will appear on the November ballot. The initiative would introduce a carbon tax with the goal of reducing carbon emissions.

Murphy is with the Yes on 732 campaign and he wants you to vote for the initiative. Dandy is the economic and environmental justice manager for progressive group OneAmerica, she wants you to vote no. 

Bill Radke speaks with Stranger art critic Jen Graves about "Streetwise Revisited: A 30 Year Journey," a series of exhibitions, screenings, and events at the Seattle Public Library's Central Branch that document the life of Erin Blackwell, known as Tiny.

The series, which documents three decades of Blackwell's life through photographs by Mary Ellen Mark and films by Martin Bell, is - as Graves says - "epic."

You remember the protesters occupying the Malheur Wildlife Reserve in Oregon, they said the Federal Government has no right to own vast amounts of land here in the west. Well their leader Ammon Bundy is on trial and you'll hear how that's going.

Also, should the Seattle Police Department be using software that can monitor your social media posts?

And creepy clowns are haunting the Puget Sound area. Some say it's disturbing, some say it's a publicity stunt. How did clowns become something everyone calls scary?

Bill Radke sits down with Sunlight Foundation staff writer Libby Watson to discuss the debate between vice presidential candidates Tim Kaine and Mike Pence Tuesday night. Watson explains that neither candidate really wanted to educate viewers on what they would actually do for the country, and the media was focused on spectacle over substance. 

Courtesy of OPB/Amanda Peacher

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Ryan Haas about the trial over the occupation of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge earlier this year. 

Afraid of clowns? There's a word for that

Oct 5, 2016
Flickr Photo/Stefan Powell (CC BY 2.0)/

The creepy clowns story has finally made it to Seattle.

This week a clown was seen walking around Green Lake at dusk. People described it as covered in blood with a choking device around its neck. Seattle Schools sent a warning to parents yesterday to keep an eye out.

Kevin Boggs in his tent in the Jungle. He moved into the Jungle on Dec. 1 last winter after moving down from Lake City where his tent had been repeatedly ransacked.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kevin Boggs is trying to find a way out of the Jungle, the large homeless camp under Interstate 5 in Seattle. But it's not that easy. Listen to some of his story to hear what he's doing in his search for stable housing. 

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Amanda Knox lives here in Seattle,building a life after her overturned murder conviction. She'll tell you about a new documentary of her story and what it's like to be exonerated but still infamous.

Plus, you don't have to wash your hands so much. We've learned more about good bacteria and we'll fill you in today.

And raw fish salad is certainly not new, so why is there a new poke boom in Seattle?

Listen to the full show above or check out one of the stories:

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about "Avid Reader" — a title after the book hugger's own heart. It's a memoir by Robert Gottlieb, who worked as editor-in-chief at the publishing houses Simon and Schuster and Alfred A. Knopf before landing at the New Yorker magazine.

Seattle resident Amanda Knox on the roof of the KUOW parking garage in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

When Amanda Knox enters a coffee shop in Seattle, she just wants a cup of coffee.

Sometimes that’s what happens.

Let your kids eat dirt, it's good for them

Oct 4, 2016
dirty kid
Flickr Photo/Benjamin Chan (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Bill Radke speaks with University of British Columbia professor B. Brett Finlay about his book, "Let Them Eat Dirt." Finlay's research shows that parents don't need to fear germs as much as they do. Finlay says bubble wrapping kids to keep them clean denies them many good microbes that help keep them healthy.