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The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about the ideas that matter most to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

Have a story that we should be talking about? Tell us! Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

The Seattle Times Photo/Steve Ringman

Rising levels of carbon dioxide are corroding the world's seas. It’s called ocean acidification, and it’s already threatening Northwest oyster beds.

Scientists think the impact of ocean acidification is happening much more rapidly than previously thought.

The Seattle Times has published a major print and online series on its impacts called "Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn" by reporter Craig Welch and photographer Steve Ringman. Craig Welch talks with Ross Reynolds.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A ballot initiative that would raise the minimum wage for some workers in SeaTac to $15 an hour could mark a major change in the larger labor movement’s strategy in the US.

Marcie Sillman talks it over with New York Times labor reporter Steven Greenhouse. We also hear from David Rolf, the president of SEIU Healthcare 775NW, and Jeff Johnson, president of the Washington State Labor Council.

AP Photo/STR

The United Nations General Assembly opened this week and on the top of the agenda is the crisis in Syria. UN weapons inspectors said that based on their investigation, chemical weapons were definitely used in an August 21 attack of a city on the outskirts of Damascus.

While many officials believe evidence points to Bashar al-Assad's government as being the perpetrator of the attack, Russia's deputy foreign minister Sergei Lavrov said yesterday that the UN and Western officials have incorrectly tied the Syrian government to that attack.

Fred Weir is the Moscow correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, he explains why Russia is still blaming the Syrian rebels for the chemical weapons attack.

Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Those who have been following the US and Seattle soccer scene for a while are familiar with Olympia-born Kasey Keller. He has been to the World Cup four times as a goalkeeper for the United States Men's National Team and played extensively in international leagues.

Back in 2008, Keller returned to where he started to play for the Seattle Sounders. He is now one of the voices of the Sounders, announcing games with Ross Fletcher. Keller joins us to talk soccer and the Sounders' performance this year.

Meet The Charter School Operators

Sep 19, 2013
School desk
Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Last November, Washington became the 42nd state to legalize charter schools. The voter-approved initiative allows for no more than 40 public charter schools to open over a five-year period. The first schools could open as early as next fall.

Next week, the state Charter School Commission will begin sifting through applications from would-be charter school operators. Who are these potential operators? And how might charter schools be different from traditional public schools?

Brenda McDonald is planning principal for the Spokane School District. She’s applying to open Pride Prep in Spokane, which would serve grades 6 through 12.

Kristina Bellamy-McClain is the former principal of Emerson Elementary in Seattle. She’s applying to open a K-8 school in South King County or Tacoma.

They talked with Ross Reynolds.

Republicans and Democrats have been debating a bill that would cut $40 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program over the next 10 years. House Republicans argue that the food stamp program has grown too large and unmanageable.  Representative Suzan DelBene, D-Wash., has been an active advocate against the Republican-backed bill. She explains the implication of this bill.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

The US Census Bureau released numbers this week looking at poverty rates and wages across the US in 2012. Our local numbers reflect what’s happening around the country: the number of people living in poverty has stagnated and wages have stayed about the same.

At first glance, this may seem like good news, or even non-news. But the census numbers reveal a larger picture of what’s happening in the wake of the recession: that people in low and middle income brackets aren’t really experiencing a recovery.

Jennifer Romich is the director of the West Coast Poverty Center and an associate professor at the UW School of Social Work. She told KUOW's Marcie Sillman the "statistically insignificant" numbers from the Census Bureau paint a concerning picture of many people that are unable to get ahead financially.

AP Photo/Katsumi Kasahara

The majority owner of the Seattle Mariners, Hiroshi Yamauchi has died in Japan at the age of 85. The former Nintendo President never watched a Mariners game in person, but he’s credited by many for saving baseball in Seattle when he purchased the team in 1992.

What’s his legacy? And what does his death mean for the Mariners organization moving forward? Geoff Baker covers the Mariners for The Seattle Times. He talked with Marcie Sillman.

Does The Gaming World Welcome Women?

Sep 19, 2013
Flickr Photo/James Cao

One of the most successful video games in history, Grand Theft Auto, released their latest version on Tuesday. It made $800 million in 24 hours. Grand Theft Auto is known for heavy violence, drugs and sex - beating up women prostitutes is regular part of the game. And this latest release, Grand Theft Auto V, is just as raunchy as expected. But this time, some female gamers aren't buying. Jezebel's night editor, Laura Beck, is one of them. Ross Reynolds talks with Beck about why she won't play Grand Theft Auto V.

Rock Star Games/Grand Theft Auto

Grand Theft Auto released its latest version on Tuesday. It made $800 million in one day. But even though this release is causing a frenzy, console games are facing tough times. The rise of tablet and mobile gaming has brought fierce competition. Ross Reynolds talks with Bloomberg Businessweek writer, Joshua Brustein about the future of console gaming.

From DASSdance's Facebook page.

Artists are inspired by all sorts of things: a song, an image or a story they want to tell. Choreographer Daniel Wilkins and his company, DASSdance, will premier a new work this weekend, “Tale of Ten Green.”

It springs from the story of the Awa people, an indigenous tribe that lives in Brazil’s Amazon River basin. The Awa haven’t had significant contact with the outside world until recently, and according to Wilkins, the experience has been both violent and exploitative.

“Tale of Ten Green” premiers Friday evening at Seattle’s Washington Hall. 

David Ewalt's book "Of Dice And Men"

Since gaining popularity in the 1970s, the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons has been a part of American culture.  Journalist David Ewalt investigates why this particular game has remained popular and culturally influential.

He began playing the game when he was 10 years old.  Now he’s an award winning journalist who writes about games for Forbes magazine.  His new book is “Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It.”

Interfaith Amigos
Flickr Photo/University of Denver

Imam Jamal Rahman, Rabbi Ted Falcon and Pastor Don Mackenzie came together just after the Iraq War began.  They wanted to find a way to discuss politics and faith and to use their religious convictions to forge a path to dialogue and eventually peace.

The Amigos were originally going to be in studio to discuss the subject of compassion and consciousness, but the unfolding events in Syria hijacked our conversation. We talked about whether President Obama’s original proposal to launch a military attack in retaliation for Syria’s use of chemical weapons was the right way forward on this issues.

KCRW

Spencer is a normal nine-year-old boy, except for one thing: he has Tourette syndrome. His mother and father, Hayley and Richard, have been searching desperately for answers as his twitching and inappropriate yelling continue to increase.

For the sake of Spencer and his little brother, Lewis, they try to keep family life normal. This is their story.

Warning: contains strong language.

Flickr Photo/Elvert Barnes

In Canada, Quebec's separatist government has attempted to ban public servants from wearing religious symbols while at work. That includes everything from crosses to face coverings. Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer has been following the story. He talks with Marcie Sillman about why the issue has so many people upset. Plus, what Neil Young said to get his music banned from at least one Alberta radio station.

Katy Butler's book "Knocking on Heaven's Door."

When Katy Butler’s father had a major stroke the family had a lot of medical options, except the one they most wanted: a humane and timely death. David Hyde speaks with Katy Butler about her new book, "Knocking On Heaven’s Door: The Path To A Better Way Of Death."

Flickr Photo/Ryan Sitzman

China plans to cut coal consumption in major northern cities including Beijing and Shanghai by 2017 to curb pollution. Could this impact demand for Wyoming coal and proposed (and controversial) coal export terminals in Washington state?  Marcie Sillman talks it over with David Roberts who writes for the Seattle-based environmental magazine, Grist.

Flickr Photo/The Ewan

Sheryl Wiser of Cascade Harvest is always in season with her recommendations on what to buy at the farmers market and how to cook it. This week we hear about varieties of garlic and tomatoes.

Flickr Photo/Secretaria de Assuntos Estratégicos Presidência da República

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has decided to postpone her state visit to the US next month. This decision comes after the revelation that the NSA had spied on Rousseff and her government. President Obama said in a statement yesterday that he “understands and regrets the concerns disclosers of alleged US intelligence activities have generated in Brazil.”

Flickr Photo/Jeff Christiansen

NASA is trying sell the historic Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida and two billionaire-backed space ventures are vying for it. One is Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, the other is Elon Musk’s SpaceX based in California. The fight over the sole use of Launch Complex 39A caused NASA to postpone their decision on what to do with it. Alan Boyle, science editor for NBCnews.com explains the dispute.

Instagram Photo/TheEnsemble

Seattle’s Fringe Festival starts this week. It features local companies and artists, but the festival is also drawing performers from around the world. 

The great recession hit small arts groups hard; the festival was on hiatus for several years after its 2003 season and returned just last year.  How did Seattle’s fringe community fare?  Seattle Times theater critic Misha Berson shares some perspective on the health of local companies with Marcie Sillman.

Lifelong Smoker Goes Into Extra Innings In His Fight Against "Mr. C"

Sep 18, 2013
Courtesy of Susan Ewbank

How do we own up to our own mortality? RadioActive reporter Madeline Ewbank tells the story of one man's baseball game against cancer and the odds stacked against him.

Jon Nyberg is sitting out on my porch, watching the sunset and working on the latest New York Times Sunday puzzle. Fifty-two down: wake-up times, for short. He's proud of the grizzled chin and the head of wispy, gray hair he's been growing, a look his friend likes to call "the Amish experiment." But his skin hangs off his bones like his cigarette hangs off his lips.

Michael Young at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

University of Washington students head back to campus next week. While the state Legislature did increase funding for the UW and other state colleges and universities, money is still a problem when it comes to higher education. It factors into everything from course offerings to faculty retention. Those are some of the challenges that face University of Washington President Michael Young. He joins us today.

Cities all over are short on cash. And some are turning to crowdfunding to get public projects off the ground. From a streetcar in Kansas City to a skate spot in Portland, Oregon, sites like Neighbor.ly and Citizinvestor are making it easy for residents to raise money to fund civic projects. Marcie Sillman talks with Rodrigo Davies, a researcher at MIT’s Center for Civic Media about civic crowdfunding and its complications.

Courtesy/UW

According to a new statewide poll, most Washingtonians support growing diversity and immigration. But many Washington residents hold negative stereotypes of Latinos and immigrants. What explains this contradiction?

Matt Barreto is co-founder of the polling firm Latino Decisions, and director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Sexuality at the University of Washington. He talked with Ross Reynolds.

Flickr Photo/Ian Fisher

The Seattle City Council is considering a proposal that would bring a free, public toilet to Pioneer Square.

Local development company Urban Visions is offering to purchase the so-called “Portland Loo” for the city, in exchange for being allowed to add three stories to its mixed-use building in the neighborhood.

AP Photo/Julio Cortez

Last Sunday Miss New York Nina Davuluri, 24, was crowned Miss America. She is the first winner of Indian descent and proudly displayed her heritage with a classical Bollywood fusion dance as her talent.

Controversy followed the coronation, as Twitter exploded with racist remarks condemning her victory. The online viewer poll favored Miss Kansas: the blonde soldier with the "Serenity Prayer" down her side.

Flickr Photo/Chatham House, London

Larry Summers has pulled out of the running to be the next head of the Federal Reserve.  The former treasury secretary and Harvard president was said to be the leading candidate for the position to replace Ben Bernanke. So why did Summers withdraw?  Joining Ross Reynolds with the latest on what’s going on in the other Washington – and what’s at stake for the country – is Annie Lowrey.  She's covering the story of the next Federal Reserve chief for the New York Times.

Flickr Photo/davidd

Brain surgery is now done by lasers. But doctors must still open up the skull in an incredibly difficult procedure. Scientists are developing a transparent skull to make it easier. The transparent skull will serve as a window into the brain allowing immediate access to check the progress of cancer without repeated surgeries.  It could take a decade before the see-through skull is perfected. Ross Reynolds talks with Masa Rao, assistant professor in mechanical engineering at the University of California Riverside who is working on the skull.

Fans at a Seattle Seahawks match.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Sunday night at Century Link Field, Seattle Seahawks fans broke the Guinness World Record for loudest crowd noise at a stadium. Then, they broke the record again. The final reading was an ear-splitting 131.9 decibels.

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