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RadioActive Youth Media

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RadioActive is the youth media program at KUOW where youth delight in discovering public radio journalism. Hear stories created by RadioActive youth producers about the people and issues that matter to young people in the Northwest. Subscribe to get our latest audio pieces delivered directly to you.

RadioActive stories produced prior to October 2012 can be found on our archive or here, too!

‘We want youth out of the criminal justice system’

Feb 16, 2017
KUOW Photo / Natalie Newcomb

“April, do you think youth easily get away with committing crimes?

“In certain cases, yes, because adults think that we’re still learning right from wrong. What do you think, Melissa?”

“To be honest, I don’t think so. I always hear about young people getting into trouble on nationwide news or at school.”

In the RadioActive podcast, hosts Melissa Takai and April Reyes share their thoughts and experiences about the criminal justice system. 


Welcome KUOW's Spring 2017 After-School RadioActive youth producers

Feb 2, 2017
Row 1: Hanni Hassan, Soraya Marashi, Tran Phung and Livi Thrift.  Row 2: Nate Martin, Ayub Weheliye, Mimi Hubbard and Emiliano Alarcon. Row 3: Milla Espinoza, Zuheera Ali and Riley Collins.
KUOW

KUOW's RadioActive Youth Media is proud to offer our afterschool Introduction to Radio Journalism workshop at the New Holly Family Center in southeast Seattle, in partnership with the Seattle Housing Authority. Eleven teens, aged 16-18, will spend 14 weeks learning what it means to be a journalist.

During that time, they'll gain the skills to create radio stories. They'll do all of the research, interviews, writing, voicing and editing to produce their own feature stories and podcasts on topics of their choice.

KUOW Photo / Rachel Lam

    

The day I arrived at Oceti Sakowin, I felt like I had come home. 

How do Seattle youth feel about a President Trump? Disbelief, stress, and for some, relief

Jan 18, 2017
KUOW Photo

"The day of the election, I felt like I was not wanted in this country. Period."

"Trump actually, I believe, cares about people."

"It is real. This is not a nightmare."


Rachel Lam

KUOW’s RadioActive youth producer Rachel Lam was on the front lines at Standing Rock, North Dakota last week, where thousands of people are protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline. The Army Corps of Engineers says they have to leave their biggest camp by Monday, December 5

What does a booming Seattle mean for young people?

Oct 21, 2016
Downtown Seattle
Flickr Photo/Jeffrey Scott Will (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://www.flickr.com/photos/cactus22minus1/24611507186/

By definition, growing pains are the problems that are experienced as something grows larger or more successful -- and there's no doubt that Seattle has been experiencing that in recent years. But has this city really become more successful? And what do these changes mean for young people? 

Courtesy of Maya Konz

When I was younger I was open about being adopted.

During show-and-tell in preschool, I shared moon cakes with my classmates to celebrate Chinese New Year. My parents were with me to explain to everyone that I was born in China and adopted at 10 months old.


The scariest thing about heroin? 'You're gonna love it'

Oct 19, 2016
Alyssa Gaudinier started using heroin when she was 14. She’s now 20 and works as a daycare teacher. Here she is before and after she got clean.
Courtesy of Alyssa Gaudinier

When she was 10 years old, Alyssa Gaudinier found the spot where her parents hid the alcohol. The moment it touched her lips, she was addicted to that escape.


Omar Ali with his family. Omar is standing fourth form the left holding his daughter.
Courtesy of Awal Ibrahim

Recently, my whole family got together to celebrate my sister’s graduation. Everyone was very excited.

But my family wasn’t always all together here in Seattle. My uncle Omar Ali is responsible for us being together at this exact moment.

Courtesy of April Reyes

This is me and my family. My mom, my dad, brother, and sister. (Not pictured: cats.) 

Six months ago, they were just strangers. And six months ago, I was homeless and couch surfing. I worked about 35 hours a week at Panda Express while attending school full time. I was a junior in high school, 16 years old. 

My dad's Cinderella story: Finding love in Somalia

Sep 28, 2016
Courtesy of Zubeyda Ahmed

My dad's life story is kind of like Cinderella’s. 

My dad, Abdul-Basit Hassan, grew up without a mom, worked for an evil relative and found his princess in the least expected way. 


KUOW Photo / Amy Styer

"Hiiiii!" 

I open the magenta door to the Lambert House, a place on Seattle's Capitol Hill where queer youth are free to be themselves.

  

Sam struggled with depression in middle school.
KUOW Photo/Natalie Newcomb

Sam, 17, has a bright smile and is always making  her friends laugh.

But in seventh grade, Sam struggled. She was trying to figure out her role in the social ladder, and her parents were fighting, and she was feeling extremely sad.


Surya Hendry

Meet Grace Zheng.

She's a 16-year-old volunteer at the Seattle Aquarium, where she chatters away to visitors about the scientific exhibits: "This is a jaw from a sixgill shark," she says, noting, "You can see how its teeth are serrated."


'How can I claim Ethiopia as my country when they oppress my people?'

Aug 8, 2016
KUOW Photo / Paul Kiefer

"Wiping someone's identity away ... is very dangerous."

That's how many Oromos feel. On our podcast today, Oromos in Seattle talk about being Oromo in America and their fears about the current human rights violations against Oromos in Ethiopia. 


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