Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 4:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. on KUOW
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi–faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened–to news radio program in the country.

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Around the Nation
4:41 am
Wed August 14, 2013

What Food Should Astronauts Eat On The Way To Mars?

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Sports
4:35 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilian Soccer Team Is Full Of Stars

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

What do John Lennon, Michael Jackson and Mahatma Gandhi have in common? You guessed it: They all play for the same Brazilian soccer team. The team is Atletico Goianiense. They just signed a striker named Carlos Adriano Souza Cruz. He's better known as Adriano Michael Jackson for his smooth celebration dances. Brazilian players often go by nicknames, even putting them on their jerseys. Just ask national team player Hulk. He's the one who looks like actor Lou Ferrigno.

Middle East
3:56 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Months-Long Political Crisis In Egypt Erupts Into Violence

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

Security forces in Cairo have begun to forcibly disband two massive protest camps there. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Morsi have been conducting a sit-in for weeks amid threats of a government crackdown. For details, Renee Montagne talks to Michael Wahid Hanna, an analyst with The Century Foundation.

Business
2:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Heard It Through The Grapevine: Raisin Grower Goes Rogue

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:26 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the story of a man many call an outlaw. His crime: growing raisins and then deciding to sell them all. His case made it all the way to the Supreme Court.

Planet Money's Zoe Chace has the story.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: You might imagine that such an ordinary thing like a raisin works the same way lots of other stuff works. The raisin grower takes his sun-dried grapes and sells them, as many as he can to whoever wants them. That's not what happens.

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Law
2:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Feds Sue To Block Proposed Airline Merger

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's hear now about a proposed airline merger. In a surprise move, the Justice Department announced yesterday that it will try to stop American Airlines and U.S. Airways from becoming one. This is largely because of two other mergers that made both Delta and United Airlines much bigger. Those deals were approved back in 2008 and 2010. Now, as NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports from Dallas, the government seems determined to change course.

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Asia
2:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Rescuers In India Try To Reach Sailors Trapped In Submarine

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In India, rescuers are trying to reach 18 sailors feared trapped in a submarine that caught fire after a massive explosion in Mumbai last night. The defense ministry said at least some of those on board have been killed. This smoldering sub is in its berth at a highly secured naval base, with only a portion visible above the surface.

This incident comes as a setback for India, just as the country is trying to beef up its military. And for more, we're joined by NPR's Julie McCarthy from New Delhi. Julie, good morning.

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The Salt
12:05 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Listeria Outbreak Still Haunts Colorado's Cantaloupe Growers

A melon washing station sprays cantaloupes with clean water and sanitizer.
Kristin Kidd

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 10:48 am

Two years after cantaloupe were linked to one of the worst foodborne outbreaks in U.S. history, lawyers have filed a fresh round of lawsuits. Meanwhile, farmers are trying to win back customers after their signature crop was tarred by a broad brush.

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The Record
12:04 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Why Steinway Is Likely To Be Sold To A Hedge Fund Manager

The Steinway Musical Instruments factory in Queens, N.Y.
Ilya Marritz

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 8:16 am

Steinway & Sons, the 160-year-old musical instrument maker, is set to change hands.

Last month, a private equity firm emerged as the company's likely buyer. But a mystery bidder — rumored to be hedge fund manager John Paulson — has swooped in at the last minute, and now looks likely to take control of one of the oldest manufacturers in the United States. Paulson made billions betting against the housing market at a time when many thought housing prices could only go up. His reported offer for the company is $458 million.

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Energy
12:01 am
Wed August 14, 2013

10 Years After The Blackout, How Has The Power Grid Changed?

The sun sets over the Manhattan skyline during a major power outage affecting a large part of the Northeastern United States and Canada on Aug. 14, 2003. Ten years later, some improvements have been made to the grid to prevent another large-scale blackout.
Robert Giroux Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:58 am

Ten years ago, a sagging power line hit a tree near Cleveland, tripping some circuit breakers. To compensate, power was rerouted to a nearby line, which began to overheat and sink down into another tree, tripping another circuit. The resulting cascade created a massive blackout in the Northeast U.S., affecting power in eight states and part of Canada.

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Parallels
12:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilians Flood To U.S. On Massive Shopping Sprees

Camila DeSouza, a 17-year-old Brazilian, shops for shoes at a mall in Sunrise, Fla., on July 16, 2012. During their winter, Brazilians flock to the U.S., mainly to shop. Even with the cost of airfare figured in, many products are far cheaper in the U.S. than in Brazil.
Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald/MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:26 pm

What's the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world? If you guessed in Mexico or China, you'd be wrong.

It's actually in Brazil, Sao Paulo to be exact. The consulate there is giving a record number of visas to Brazilians who want to visit the U.S. And that is giving a boost to the economies of cities like Miami.

On a recent day, Tiago Dalcien and his girlfriend stand outside the U.S. Consulate in Sao Paulo clutching their passports and other documents. He is a 30-year-old banker; his girlfriend is a doctor.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
11:59 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Determined To Reach 1963 March, Teen Used Thumb And Feet

Robert Avery has been a councilman in his hometown of Gadsden, Ala., for almost three decades. As a teen, he and two friends hitchhiked to the nation's capital, where they made signs for the March on Washington.
Erica Yoon NPR

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 6:48 am

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
11:03 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

The Vintage Cadillac With The Memphis Soundtrack

American Safari tour guide Tad Pierson stands beside his 1955 pink Cadillac. Visitors to Memphis can get a personalized tour that highlights the city's rich music heritage.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

In the town where I grew up — Memphis, Tenn. — Tad Pierson has made a career out of his love for cars and American music by working as a tour guide. We meet in the grand lobby of the Peabody Hotel, the downtown landmark famous for its ducks and Southern elegance. But it's also considered the starting point of the Mississippi Delta, a region steeped in the blues.

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Sweetness And Light
10:55 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Pete Rose Should Enter The Hall Of Fame With Ichiro Suzuki

Former baseball player Pete Rose at a boxing event in Oakland, Calif., on Sept. 8, 2012.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:16 am

In Japan, a noren is a short curtain that hangs to the entrance of a little teahouse or restaurant. It is not solid, but made of strips, and so when you go through it, your hand goes first, then your arm, and the rest of you, but quickly the strips fall back into place, and it is as if a wisp, a ghost, a sprite has passed through.

I always visualized Ichiro Suzuki that way, slipping from Japanese baseball to our major leagues so effortlessly, barely stirring the air.

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Around the Nation
4:35 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Ohio Casino Acknowledges Mistake, Awards 2 Winners

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Our next millionaire is Kevin Lewis. That's what Kevin Lewis of Cincinnati, Ohio heard last Saturday night while visiting the Horseshoe Casino in Cleveland. He'd won a $1 million giveaway. He was shocked. He was thrilled.

And he was the wrong Kevin Lewis from Cincinnati, something casino officials only realized as he was accepting his prize. It was our blunder, they said, so both Kevin Lewises get to keep their $1 million prizes. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:19 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Atlanta Braves Find Another Use For Duct Tape

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

The baseball helmet is meant to protect players. But it's increasingly becoming a problem for Atlanta Braves third baseman Chris Johnson. For the second time in two seasons, Johnson was ejected from a game after arguing with an umpire and throwing his helmet. Next game, Johnson hit the field with a new piece of equipment: duct tape over his mouth. The Braves need Johnson in the game. He's leading the league in batting and so the team hopes this new strategy sticks.

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