Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 4:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. on KUOW
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi–faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened–to news radio program in the country.

Composer ID: 
5182a719e1c89ec2617cc323|5182a70fe1c89ec2617cc30a

Pages

The Two-Way
1:41 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Kodak Reinvents Itself As Judge Approves Bankruptcy Exit

Guy Solimano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:54 am

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Allan Gropper has approved Kodak's plan to emerge from court oversight. That paves the way for it to be a much smaller company focused on commercial and packaging printing.

The plan received the judge's approval on Tuesday, and the company hopes to put it into effect as soon as Sept. 3, reports Kate O'Connell of member station WXXI in Rochester, N.Y.

Read more
The Salt
12:05 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Young Farmers Break The Bank Before They Get To The Field

Eva Teague, 31, is trying to start her own pig farm in Colorado but is running into financial obstacles typical of many young farmers trying to break into the business.
Luke Runyon KUNC/Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:29 am

As the average age of the American farmer has crept up to 60, fewer young people are filling in the ranks behind them. That's prompted some to ask if young people even want to farm anymore.

The quick answer is yes, just not in the same numbers as they used to. And surveys indicate many of them don't want to farm in conventional ways.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
12:05 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Tennis Fans: A Stadium Roof Is Coming. So Is Regis Philbin

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:03 am

The ugliest, most ill-conceived physical addition to sports scenery was the construction, a few years ago, of the Arthur Ashe tennis stadium at the U.S. Open. Typical U.S. supersize. We'll be bigger than everyone else, so there.

Alas, in the upper reaches of this charmless behemoth you need a GPS to find the players somewhere down there at sea level. Worse, should it rain, which it has a wont to do in New York, there are no players on the court and you get wet.

Read more
Sports
12:04 am
Wed August 21, 2013

With An Urban Face-Lift, Vintage Bike Polo Picks Up Speed

Jacob Newborn takes a shot past Lodewijk Broekhuizen (left) during a bike polo practice session in Milwaukee.
Morry Gash AP

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:54 am

Several vintage sports have seen resurgence among young people lately: roller derby, kickball and even bocce ball. But one century-old sport hasn't just found new fans; it's getting an urban makeover.

Welcome to hardcourt bike polo. On a hot, sunny day in Roseville, Minn., the second day of the 2013 North American Hardcourt Bike Polo Championship is about to begin.

Read more
Animals
3:38 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Obamas Welcome New Puppy To The White House

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of a new member of the First Family. Bo may be the first dog but he's no longer the only dog. He now has a sister - Sunny. She's just over a year old and, like Bo, she's a Portuguese water dog. She'll likely join Bo in some official duties like greeting kids at the annual Easter egg hunt. The White House blog says Sunny was born in Michigan. And we'll believe that, after we see the birth certificate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
3:34 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Ball State Students Wins Free Tuition For Spring Semester

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana has an annual basketball challenge for incoming freshmen: Hit a shot from half court, win free tuition for a semester. No one had ever done it until this year. Markus Burden was picked randomly from the crowd. He missed twice and then sunk the shot.

He told the college paper this gives his family more financial breathing room. His mom told him to enjoy all of this attention - briefly - then hit the books.

Author Interviews
3:23 am
Tue August 20, 2013

'Southern League': Birmingham Barons Break Racial Divide

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 4:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pro baseball hasn't done much to inspire lately, think doping. But here is a story that might restore your faith in the good of the game.

(APPLAUSE)

GREENE: In Alabama earlier this season, the Minor League Birmingham Barons welcomed back some veteran players from a seminal year in the team's and the city's history.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: And now, ladies and gentlemen, doing our first pitch tonight, our 1964 Barons.

Read more
Business
2:54 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Older Farmers Seem To Be In No Hurry To Call It Quits

Farmers are getting older. In the last census taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 25 percent of farm operators were more than 65 years old. Neighbors and younger farmers would like to have their land. But for a variety of reasons, it's hard to convince an older farmer to give it up.

Asia
2:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Pakistan's Former Leader Musharraf Charged In Bhutto's Death

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 2:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. A dramatic turn of events in Pakistan this morning where a court has indicted the country's former military ruler, Pervez Musharraf, in the murder of Benazir Bhutto. Bhutto was an internationally known name and a popular former prime minister of Pakistan who was making a political comeback in 2007 when she was assassinated at a campaign rally.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Researchers Use Genetic History To Answer Mutation Questions

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In the American Southwest, a rare genetic disorder known as the Common Hispanic Mutation has haunted those of Spanish descent for nearly 400 years. It's been called "El Frio," or the cold. Now, to understand the disease, researchers in New Mexico are digging into the genetic history of residents. From member station KUNM in Albuquerque, Tristan Ahtone reports.

Read more
History
2:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:49 am

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

Environment
11:57 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

How Extreme Australian Rains Made Global Sea Levels Drop

Heavy rains in Australia in 2010 and 2011 flooded farmland and homes, like these in the Queensland state town of St. George, seen here on Feb. 7. 2011.
Sally Nicol Rigney AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:19 am

Global sea level has been rising as a result of global warming, but in 2010 and 2011, sea level actually fell by about a quarter of an inch.

Scientists now say they know why: It has to do with extreme weather in Australia.

The sea level drop coincided with some of the worst flooding in that continent's history. Dozens of people died and torrents washed away houses and cars, forcing thousands from their homes.

Read more
Gun Laws
11:56 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

One By One, California Agents Track Down Illegally Owned Guns

Firearms seized during a sweep by the Los Angeles Police Department using the California's Armed Prohibited Persons System initiative. The program uses a database to identify gun owners who are no longer allowed to possess a firearm.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:57 am

In California, officials are ramping up a unique program that identifies and seizes guns from people who are prohibited from keeping them. Under state law, a legally registered gun owner loses the right to own a firearm when he or she is convicted of a crime or becomes mentally ill.

Read more
Music News
11:03 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

How To Win That Music Competition? Send A Video

If someone like Lang Lang were starting out now, the energetic concert pianist could nail every piano competition without the judges ever hearing a note, according to a new study.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 2:13 am

Chia-Jung Tsay was something of a piano prodigy. By age 12, she was performing Mendelssohn in concert. At 16, she made her debut at Carnegie Hall. Soon, she was on her way to some of the best music schools in the country — Juilliard and the Peabody Conservatory. And she was throwing her hat in the ring for different competitions.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:46 am
Mon August 19, 2013

What Do You Do When Your Cable TV Goes Out?

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:52 am

Here's one thing not to do: call 911. Police in Fairfield, Conn., had to remind residents Sunday night that a cable drop-out is not "an emergency or a police-related concern." They added that misusing the 911 system can result in arrest.

Pages