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Monday - Friday, 4:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. on KUOW
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi–faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened–to news radio program in the country.

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Politics
12:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Colorado Voters To Decide 2 Lawmakers' Fates In Recall Elections

State Sens. Angela Giron and John Morse, both Democrats, face recall elections Tuesday. The battle in Colorado has attracted major players from across the nation, reflecting the sustained intensity over the issue of gun rights.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 11:01 am

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

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Author Interviews
12:05 am
Tue September 10, 2013

During Katrina, 'Memorial' Doctors Chose Who Lived, Who Died

Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2005.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:08 am

On Aug. 30, 2005, a doctor climbed the stairs through a New Orleans hospital to the helipad, which was rarely used, and so old and rusted it wasn't even painted with the hospital's current name.

From that helipad over Memorial Medical Center, the doctor looked out over New Orleans, now flooding after Hurricane Katrina. He considered the more than 2,000 people in the hospital below — 244 of them patients.

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History
12:04 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Remembering A 'Brave,' 'Lucky' Hero In The War Of 1812

The U.S. Brig Niagara is a replica of the ship Oliver Hazard Perry sailed to victory. The Niagara carries four carronades, or short-range cannons. The original ship was outfitted with 18 carronades that could shoot a 32-pound ball about half a mile.
Ryan Whaley Green Door Mediawork

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:08 am

Two hundred years ago today, a young U.S. naval captain named Oliver Hazard Perry penned the words, "We have met the enemy and they are ours ..."

Perry's remarkable victory over the British changed the course of the War of 1812, and a full-scale re-enactment — the largest sailing re-enactment ever attempted in the U.S. — recently commemorated the anniversary of the win in the Battle of Lake Erie.

A Bit Of History

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Code Switch
12:04 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Congress Honors Victims Of Infamous Alabama Church Bombing

One man was convicted in the bombing in 1977, but more than two decades would pass before any other suspects were tried for murder.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:32 am

On Tuesday, Congress will bestow its highest civilian honor — posthumously — on the young victims of a deadly Alabama church bombing from the civil rights era.

The Congressional Gold Medals for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley come 50 years after the black girls were killed by a Ku Klux Klan bomb.

Just as the federal recognition is long in coming, so was justice.

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Shots - Health News
4:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Humanitarian Aid Agencies Brace For Fallout From Syrian Strikes

At the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, many families struggle to get clean water, food and health services.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 8:04 am

The World Health Organization says the Syrian civil war is currently the worst ongoing humanitarian crisis on earth.

Aid groups have been scrambling to provide shelter, food, water and health care to the huge numbers of people who've been uprooted by the fighting. The big question now is whether U.S. military action could spark another wave of refugees and make the situation worse.

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Europe
4:00 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Tourists Flock To Downton, England

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
3:51 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Sailor Proposes To Girlfriend Among Flash Mob Dancers

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Michael Turner. He's a sailor on a guided missile destroyer. He wanted to propose to Jamie Story before he was deployed, so he invited her to dinner in Virginia Beach. And according to the Virginian-Pilot, that's when the flash mob appeared. Mr. Turner arranged for 50 dancers to do synchronized steps on the street as he proposed. Luckily, she said yes, 'cause otherwise it would have been awkward.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Concert Stirs Strife In Disputed Kashmir Region

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The New York City Opera may be forced to cancel the rest of its current season and all of its next season, if it is not able to raise $20 million by the end of the year. It has been known as the People's Opera since it debuted 70 years ago. Its mission: Making opera more accessible and affordable. City Opera, as it's called, has experienced what it calls a cash crisis for some years. And now, it's started a Kickstarter campaign to raise the money it needs to survive.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Congress Returns Facing Work Besides Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, when Representative Cole and his colleagues return to Capitol Hill today, they will hear about Syria from administration officials.

NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Rep. Cole Weighs In On Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Seeking to win support in Congress for air strikes on Syria, President Obama addresses the nation tomorrow and also gives a series of TV interviews today. Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is also going to America's airwaves. Asked on CBS if a strike on his country could provoke a retaliation involving chemical weapons, this was his response.

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Around the Nation
12:31 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Trail Life USA, The 'Other' Boy Scouts Of America

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:49 am

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All Tech Considered
12:30 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:12 am

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

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Parallels
12:29 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How To Build An Afghan Army, In A Million Difficult Steps

Afghan soldiers and contractors are taught about the workings of a diesel-powered electrical generator at Forward Operating Base Nolay in Helmand province.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:57 am

It's 8 a.m. on a recent day at Forward Operating Base Nolay, a small Marine outpost in Taliban-infested Sangin District of southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. The Marines are in the process of caffeinating and preparing for the day.

Suddenly, explosions and gunfire ring out. The Marines don't run for their weapons or bunkers for that matter. They don't even flinch.

"We can sit here and we can have a cup of coffee when there's booms going on, we're not concerned about it," says Lt. Col. Jonathan Loney.

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Middle East
4:23 am
Fri September 6, 2013

White House 'Exhausts' Diplomatic Options On Syria

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 9:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A single sentence sums up President Obama's challenge in winning congressional support for a strike on Syria. Congressman Elijah Cummings said it yesterday on NPR's TELL ME MORE.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

REPRESENTATIVE ELIJAH CUMMINGS: Let me tell something. When you've got 97 percent of your constituents saying no, it's kind of hard to say yes.

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Around the Nation
4:21 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida's Byler Sextuplets Turn Six Years Old

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 9:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Florida's first sextuplets turn 6 this week. And the Byler kids have also started kindergarten - each in separate classrooms.

Apparently, it's been a tough transition with a lot of tears. It's the first time the five brothers and one sister have been on their own since they were born. It also made more work for their mother. She had to bake 120 cupcakes so that each of the six children would have enough for each classroom party.

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