Here & Now

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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Microbiologist Says To Avoid The Flu, Go Outside

A microbiologist recommends spending time outside in order to avoid getting sick this flu season. (Maxwell GS/Flickr)

Want to avoid catching the flu or your co-worker’s cold this year? 

Get some fresh air and wash your hands with soap and water, microbiologist Jack Gilbert tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Gilbert says we’ve created an urban world complete with air conditioning, filtration and windows that don’t open, leading to an environment of homogeneous microbes.

Add a healthy dose of bacteria from the outdoors, and you may just be fine. Getting a dog could help, too.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Suspected Gunman In Custody After LAX Shooting

A still image from NBC LA shows a person being loaded into an ambulance at Los Angeles International Airport. (Joseph Weisenthal/Twitter)

Update 4:23 p.m.: Law enforcement officials identify LAX shooting suspect as 23-year-old Paul Ciancia.

Update 2:49 p.m.: Union official: TSA agent killed in LAX shooting.

Update 2:20 p.m.: Police say 3 shot, including TSA agent, by gunman with semi-automatic weapon at LAX.

A suspected gunman was in custody Friday following a shooting at Los Angeles airport that left multiple people wounded and disrupted flights nationwide.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Wally Lamb Mines Childhood Memories For New Novel

Wally Lamb, whose latest book is "We Are Water," is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 2:35 pm

In novels such as “I Know This Much is True” and “The Hour I First Believed,” best-selling author Wally Lamb explores how a traumatic incident continues to reverberate years afterward.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

'Spinning Plates' Documentary Explores Restaurants

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 2:35 pm

The new foodie documentary “Spinning Plates” takes us inside three extraordinary restaurants and introduces us to the teams that keep them running.

And though the title might suggest the chaos of a busy kitchen, the documentary is warm and gentle, and anything but hectic.

NPR’s Trey Graham has this review.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Senate Democrats Pledge Support For Employment Non-Discrimination Act

Get Equal, a LGBT rights group, holds a march to pass ENDA in 2010. The bill has languished in Congress, but the Senate will take a vote on it as early as next week. (Matt Baume/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 2:35 pm

West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin says he’ll vote for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, known as ENDA, making him the latest Senate Democrat to throw his support behind the law that would ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity in the workplace.

The bill is now only one vote shy of a filibuster-proof majority. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said earlier this week that he will push for a vote as early as next week.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Obama-Era Stock Market Gains Surpass Reagan Era

A view from the Member's Gallery inside the New York Stock Exchange in August 2008. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:29 pm

President Obama has passed Ronald Reagan and is gaining on Bill Clinton, when it comes to how far the stock market has climbed during his time in office.

Under Obama, the S & P 500 has has jumped 120 percent. That beats Reagan’s 118 percent and is closing in on Bill Clinton’s 210 percent.

Is it fair to compare these presidents? And how much down the president have to do with the stock market, anyway?

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson asks Roben Farzad of Bloomberg Businessweek.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Resident Chef Kathy Gunst Takes Stock Of Soup

Clockwise from top: Kathy Gunst's Roasted Fall Vegetable Soup, Winter Parsley Pesto, Greek-Style Turkey-Lemon-Rice Soup ("Avgolemono"), store-bought chicken stock and homemade chicken stock. (Rachel Rohr/Here & Now)

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:02 pm

As the weather turns cooler, Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst’s thoughts turn to nice warming soups.

And as she tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, making a simple soup base or stock is easy and a great way to get rid of leftovers.

“Everything that’s in the vegetable bin that looks like ‘uh,oh, if we don’t use it tonight we’re in trouble’ kind of feeling? Throw it into the pot, boil it up, make a soup.”

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Company Aims To Go Beyond Credit Cards

Credit card companies charge businesses 2 to 4 percent of each purchase with a credit card. (tom.arthur/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:29 pm

Businesses frustrated by the fees they pay to credit card companies are looking at a European Union proposal that would reduce the swipe fees merchants have to pay every time a customer pays with a card.

The EU proposal calls for a cap on the swipe fees of 0.3 percent of the amount charged to a card — far lower than the 2 to 4 percent typically charged now.

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NPR Story
12:49 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Looking Back At NYC Outages During Sandy

Pushcart Coffee in New York City drew many new customers during the Hurricane Sandy power outages, because it had a generator. (Jeffrey/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 1:18 pm

One year ago today, Superstorm Sandy left part of Manhattan completely in the dark and without cell coverage.

One coffee shop owner, just opening a new shop, drew many new customers because he had a generator.

Jamie Rogers, owner of Pushcart Coffee speaks with Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson about those days without power and how his generator idea has paid off.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Visiting Staten Island A Year After Sandy

Jean and Mary outside Mary's home in Staten Island. (Robin Young/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:56 am

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

What Should the Fed Do To Stimulate Growth?

The Federal Reserve’s two-day policy meeting begins tomorrow. It’s unclear what action the Fed will take, given the sluggish economy, high unemployment and the effects of the recent government shutdown.

Some economists say inflation is just what the country needs. Meanwhile, Republican Senator Rand Paul is threatening to delay the confirmation of Janet Yellen as the next chair of the Federal Reserve.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Song Of The Week: 'Tourniquet' By Jeremy Messersmith

Jeremy Messersmith's latest single is "Tourniquet." (Cameron Wittig)

Jeremy Messersmith

This week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson introduces us to a newly-released single by Jeremy Messersmith.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Appalachian Mountain Club Huts Turn 125

The Mizpah Spring Hut welcomes its visitors. (Chris Ballman/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 1:43 pm

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Blanket Of Smog In Chinese City Renews Coal Debate

The cloud of smog that smothered Harbin, China, as seen from space. (NOAA)

Cool winds are bringing relief to nearly 10 million residents of the northern Chinese city of Harbin, where thick smog caused schools, airports and businesses to shutter their doors earlier this week. Residents were ordered to remain indoors. At the pollution’s worst, visibility was only 65 feet.

The smog coincided with the first day residents fired up their heating systems in a city known for its cold temperatures and ice festivals.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

SEC Approves Crowdfunding For Startups

New businesses will soon be able to raise raise money online and give investors a stake in the company.

The Securities and Exchange Commission just approved a proposal that would allow startups and small businesses to solicit relatively small sums of money on the web.

The rule would allow entrepreneurs to raise up to $1 million a year from investors. Critics say this sort of crowdfunding does not protect investors – or companies.

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