Here & Now

Monday - Thursday, 10:00 a.m. - noon on KUOW

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine.

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NPR Story
1:18 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

China Mobile And Apple Sign iPhone Deal

China Mobile, the world's largest mobile carrier, will soon provide iPhone service on its network. (William Hook/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 8:00 am

The world’s largest mobile carrier, China Mobile, will soon offer iPhones on its network.

The deal gives Apple access to more than 700 million subscribers. That’s seven times the size of Verizon Wireless.

Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic, joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the implications of the deal.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Miami Gears Up For Art Basel

Street artist Komik in front of his piece. (Julia Duba/WLRN)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 8:03 am

Every year, tens of thousands of people attend the international art show in Miami Beach called Art Basel. There are arts galleries, live music performances and lots of live street exhibitions on the street.

Art Basel, which runs from Dec. 5 to 8, also comes to Miami’s up-and-coming neighborhood, Wynwood. With its warehouses-turned-art galleries, Wynwood is a prime location for street art.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

NPR's Planet Money Follows The Life Of A T-Shirt

Lisa, 30, is one of many people who bought the shirt and posted a photo of herself wearing it on Instagram.

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 8:03 am

If you’ve been listening to NPR this week, you’ve probably heard about something called the t-shirt project.

Months ago, Planet Money had the idea to design a t-shirt and follow it around the world as it was manufactured.

The project took the Planet Money team around the globe: from factories in Bangladesh and Colombia, to cotton farms and container ships.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

New Bombs Pose New Threat

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 8:04 am

With top U.S. lawmakers warning of new terrorism threats, intelligence officials in the U.K. say there remains an enduring threat from bombs made by terrorists in Yemen.

The threat comes from the type of bomb that failed to explode on a plane over Detroit in 2009 — the so-called underwear bomber.

The BBC’s security correspondent Frank Gardner reports.

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NPR Story
12:22 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Photographer Hopes To Put Face On Syrian Statistics

A one-year old Syrian refugee in his bed and play pen in Tripoli, Lebanon. His family fled Syria just after he was born. He spends most of his time in this box which is his bed, play pen, refuge. This crate resides on the grounds of an active slaughter house where his family now lives. (Elena Dorfman)

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:19 pm

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Did Silicon Valley Help The NSA Spy?

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:19 pm

Georgetown University professor Abraham Newman argues that business practices at the big technology companies have helped the National Security Agency gather consumers’ personal data in the U.S. and abroad.

Technology companies have reacted sharply to revelations of N.S.A. spying on their customers’ data. Google said, “We are outraged at the lengths to which the government seems to have gone to intercept data from our private fiber networks, and it underscores the need for urgent reform.”

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

'Giving Tuesday' Follows Record-Breaking Cyber Monday

(givingtuesday.org)

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:19 pm

Cyber Monday, the Super Bowl of online sales, broke all records this year, with sales up 19 percent over last year.

Mobile traffic accounted for 13 percent of total site visits, and sales are projected to reach $2 billion for desktop online sales, according to comScore.

But the bonanza isn’t over. Today is “Giving Tuesday.” The movement to create a national day of giving started last year, raising $10 million dollars for more than 2,500 charities nationwide.

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NPR Story
12:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Raising Children In Two Faiths

One of the state Christmas trees and the National Menorah near the White House are pictured in in 2009. (Kevin H./Flickr)

Nearly half of the marriages in the U.S. over the last decade have been between people of different faiths, and many of those families are raising children fully in both parents’ religious traditions.

Susan Katz Miller talked to Here & Now’s Robin Young about the rise of interfaith families. She herself is the great-granddaughter of a rabbi, and married to the great-grandson of an Episcopal bishop. They are raising their children fully in both faiths, Jewish and Episcopal Christian.

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NPR Story
12:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Auburn-Alabama: The Greatest Play In College Football History?

College football fans on Saturday witnessed what some are calling the greatest play in college football history, at the Iron Bowl game between the Auburn Tigers and the Alabama Crimson Tide.

Auburn’s Chris Davis caught the missed Alabama field goal and ran over 100 yards for the touchdown that gave Auburn the win. Auburn now moves onto SEC Championship.

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NPR Story
12:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

What Happens To Failed Shopping Malls?

Euclid Square Mall in Northeast Ohio is now the site of 24 Christian congregations. (David C. Barnett/WCPN)

Successful malls can be some of the most bustling places in America: enclosed commercial districts that are “people magnets,” with packed parking lots and a variety of popular shops, department stores and restaurants.

But over the years, online shopping and a roller coaster economy have turned many malls into ghost towns.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, David C. Barnett of WCPN examines the afterlife of some malls in Northeast Ohio.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Top Amazon Reviewers Get Big Perks

Michael Erb gets thousands of dollars in free merchandise for being a top reviewer on Amazon. (Michael E Mobile Sound/Facebook)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

Whether or not you read them, the customer reviews on retailers’ websites have enormous value, mostly for the company.

The more a product is reviewed, the more likely it is that people will buy that product and the more money companies such as Amazon make.

So the benefits of online reviews are obvious for retailers, but what’s in it for the most prolific reviewers? For Amazon’s top reviewers, the benefits are tangible.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

The True Origin Of The Term 'Black Friday'

Linguist Ben Zimmer says that the term "Black Friday" has more to do with Philadelphia Police than retailers. (Damon Green/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

Many people assume the term “Black Friday” comes from the massive shopping day, the day after Thanksgiving, that puts retailers back in the black.

But as linguist Ben Zimmer tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti, the term can be traced to the frustration of factory managers in the 1950s, and the frustration of Philadelphia traffic police in the 1960s.

Zimmer says the rebranded term referring to retailers turning a profit didn’t appear until the 1980s.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

It's Rivalry Weekend In College Football

Auburn running back Onterio McCalebb (23) stiff arms Alabama defender Brent Calloway (21) during a kick return during the first half of an NCAA college football game on Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (Butch Dill/AP)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

When I was 7th grader in Durham, North Carolina, I had a teacher named Mrs. Crawford. She was a North Carolina fan. I rooted for Duke. The two universities are less than 10 miles apart. I think my rooting interest might have affected my grade.

That’s a joke but not too far from the truth. These college football rivalries are pretty serious stuff.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Did Comet ISON Fly Too Close To The Sun?

ISON appears as a white smear heading up and away from the sun. ISON was not visible during its closest approach to the sun, so many scientists thought it had disintegrated, but images like this one from the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory suggest that a small nucleus may be intact. (ESA/NASA/SOHO/GSFC)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

Kelly Beatty, Sky and Telescopes’s senior contributing editor, joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti with the latest on the path of Comet ISON. The comet at first seemed to have fallen apart as it approached the sun’s sizzling surface, but new images today show a streak of light that some say could indicate it’s not game over just yet.

U.S. Navy solar researcher Karl Battams writes on his blog that “it does appear that at least some small fraction of ISON has remained in one piece.”

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

'Tis The Season For New Cookbooks

(Hideya Hamano/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 11:55 am

Cookbooks abound this time of year, just in time for holiday feasting.

Among the stacks on NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey‘s desk are cookbooks for slow cooking, gluten-free baked goods and practical books for fresh and simple foods.

She shares some of the best ones with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

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