Here & Now

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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Legal Battle Could Prevent Opening Of Popular Utah Ski Mountain

The ski season at Park City Mountain Resort is now up in the air because of a protracted fight over the rights to the slopes. (Kimberly Brown-Azzarello/Flickr)

Park City, Utah, is best known for the famous Sundance Film Festival that it hosts every winter, as well as being home to one of the most popular ski resorts in the country: Park City Mountain Resort.

But the future of that mountain, and the 2014-2015 ski season, is now up in the air because of a protracted and very public fight over the rights to the slopes.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

As Kurdish Troops Fight Islamic Militants, Kurdish Media Goes Global

The United States has been drawn back into Iraq, and the pull this time is the Kurdish region.

There might be strategic, economic and humanitarian reasons for it, but one Iraqi Kurdish journalist says the media should take some credit for the world turning its attention to a once-ignored people.

Yerevan Saeed of the Irbil-based news outlet Rudaw, joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to explain why.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Yellen's Signals On Interest Rates Still Unclear

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen arrives for a dinner during the Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium at the Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyo. Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. (John Locher/AP)

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen spoke at an annual Fed conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, today and offered no clear sign the Fed would raise interest rates this year.

Yellen’s remarks were highly anticipated, as the economy and labor market improves. But disagreement among Fed officials is growing over fears the U.S. isn’t getting a handle on inflation before it becomes a problem.

Yellen said Friday that while unemployment has gone down, other economic indicators have been harder to evaluate.

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NPR Story
11:35 am
Thu August 21, 2014

The Challenges Of Recruiting An All-Volunteer Army

New recruits swear in during the Army Reserve Mega Event in Whitehall, Ohio, June 22, 2013. (Andrew Baba/U.S. Army)

The U.S. Army has been an all-volunteer force for more than 40 years because there is no military draft anymore. That means the service has to attract young men and women to sign up.

And according to the Army’s numbers they’re pretty good at it. The Army has met or exceeded its recruiting goals for each of the last nine years.

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NPR Story
11:19 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Recipes To Make The Most Of Summer Tomatoes

The tomato bounty from Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst's garden in Maine. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:30 pm

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joins hosts Jeremy Hobson and Meghna Chakrabarti with the summer’s bounties from her garden — tomatoes of all shapes and sizes. She has all sorts of ideas for how to cook with them, and shares these recipes:

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NPR Story
11:19 am
Thu August 21, 2014

CDC Director On Release Of American Ebola Patients

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, before the House subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations hearing on "Combating the Ebola Threat." (Molly Riley/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:48 pm

As both American Ebola patients who were brought from Liberia to Atlanta for treatment are released, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Modern-Day Dust Bowl Isn't Easy, But It Beats The 1930s

Farmer John Schweiser, 80, has had to take shelter from recent dust storms. He also lived through the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

The historic drought that continues to hammer the West shows no signs off abating. Most of California remains in severe drought conditions, with its groundwater aquifers in danger of being depleted. Officials in Los Angeles have beefed up their use of “water cops” to make sure people aren’t wasting water.

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NPR Story
12:07 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Bumper U.S. Corn Yield Could Top Records

Early rains, cooler temperatures and hardier seeds have led to projections of a record harvest of corn this year. Most of that corn is used for livestock feed and ethanol.

Because of the predicted glut, corn prices have dropped by 13 percent this year.

Bryce Knorr of Farm Futures magazine tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that consumers can expect to see prices drop at the gas pump, but not at the grocery store.

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NPR Story
12:07 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

In Liberia, Ebola Quarantine Sparks Riots

Members of Liberia's Ebola Task Force enforce a quarantine on the West Point slum on August 20, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. (John Moore/Getty Images)

In Liberia this morning, security forces attempted to quarantine the West Point neighborhood in the capital Monrovia, but residents broke out in a riot.

The Ebola holding center in West Point has been keeping residents on edge. On Saturday, an angry mob attacked the center, chasing and carrying out patients.

NPR photographer David Gilkey talks to Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabari about what he saw this morning as the riots began.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Man Dead After Officer-Involved Shooting In St. Louis

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 12:53 pm

Authorities in St. Louis say a man has been shot dead by police after brandishing a knife at officers. The shooting took place in the north St. Louis area, a few miles from the suburb of Ferguson, where there have been protests for more than a week following the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer.

The Wall Street Journal’s Ben Kesling tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that it’s not clear if the shooting today has any connection to the protests in Ferguson.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Tue August 19, 2014

How Flight Changed The World - And What Might Be Next

First flight of the Wright Flyer I, December 17, 1903, Orville piloting, Wilbur running at wingtip. (John T. Daniels/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 12:53 pm

Today is National Aviation Day, the date chosen in part because it’s the birthday of Orville Wright, who flew the very first airplane in 1903, with his brother Wilbur Wright.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong carried at piece of wood and some fabric from the Wright brothers’ 1903 flyer to the moon, connecting the first airplane flight to space exploration.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Tue August 19, 2014

California Tries To Lure Film Industry Back Home

California has watched its dominance over the film and TV industry wane as other states, and even other countries, offer producers lucrative tax incentives. This has cost the state thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in lost economic output.

Now California is fighting back. A bill is moving through the state legislature that would quadruple the amount of tax incentives available to TV and movie makers each year.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Home Construction Jumps, Even As Housing Market Cools

New data from the Commerce Department on home construction shows new construction climbed more than 15 percent in July from the previous month, and applications for building permits jumped 8 percent.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Mon August 18, 2014

Revisiting Tom Hardy's Solo Performance In 'Locke'

“Locke,” a film about a construction manager whose life unravels as he drives from Birmingham to London, was one of the top DVD rentals of the weekend, according to Redbox.

The film’s star, Tom Hardy, is the sole actor to appear onscreen. Through the course of the film, his character makes phone calls revealing how his trip has managed to put both his job and his marriage in jeopardy.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Mon August 18, 2014

One Key To Getting A Green Card: Luck

An example of the "Green Card" issued by the Immigration and Naturalization Service is seen in an undated handout photo. (Khue Bui/AP)

Last year, while the president and Congress were arguing over the future of comprehensive immigration reform, nearly a million people got a green card — permission to live legally and permanently — in the United States.

A green card is the ultimate prize for would-be immigrants across the globe, but getting one is very difficult. In some cases, it’s a matter of sheer luck.

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