Conversation

No longer on air.

The Conversation covers current events in politics, public affairs, culture and science. Host Ross Reynolds opens the phone for listeners to participate in spirited discussions on the issues of the day. 

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To find stories by The Conversation older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "The Conversation" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

How To Survive A Lightning Strike

Aug 12, 2013
Flickr Photo/Jason Foster

You know how they say you’re more likely to get struck by lightning than win the lottery? About 300 people are struck by lightning every year. How can you make sure you’re not one? We get the answers from John Jensenius, Lightning Safety Specialist at NOAA national weather service.

Courtesy of University of Washington

University of Washington graduate student Kiana Scott is the sole student regent on the University of Washington Board of Regents, the governing body of the university. Ross Reynolds talks to her about how she represents the interests of such a diverse student population

Faith And Madness On The Alaska Frontier

Aug 8, 2013
Tom Kizzia's book "Pilgrim's Wilderness."

It’s not unusual to find people looking for a new life in Alaska. That’s what the man who called himself Papa Pilgrim seemed to be when he arrived in McCarthy with his wife and 15 children. But there was much more to the story. Alaskan journalist Tom Kizzia tells the story in "Pilgrim’s Wilderness: A True Story of Faith and Madness on the Alaska Frontier.”

Back Alley Caviar

Aug 8, 2013
Flickr Photo/Renee Suen

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has charged two men with illegally selling caviar, steelhead and salmon as a part of an international fish poaching ring. The men are accused of selling undercover agents American paddlefish eggs and salmon and steelhead that was poached illegally here in Washington state waters. Ross Reynolds talks with Mike Cenci, marine patrol captain for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Law Enforcement Program.

AMBER Alert Goes Cellular

Aug 8, 2013

  The AMBER alert system began in Texas in the mid 1990s and has grown from small town partnership to satellite system. According to the Office of Justice program website AMBER stands for America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response. The acronym was created as a legacy to 9-year-old Amber Hagerman, who was kidnapped while riding her bicycle in Arlington, Texas, and then brutally murdered. 

The wireless AMBER alert system was introduced in December to send alerts automatically based on cell phone location. It is a nationwide program operated by FEMA, the FCC and commercial cellular companies. Last night some of you may have received an AMBER alert on your phone. The alert originated in California, then was sent out in Oregon and then statewide here in Washington, as they believed the suspect was heading up to Canada. Ross Reynolds talks with Washington State Patrol's program manager for the Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit, Carrie Gordon, about how the cellular alerts work. 

The Rationale Of Irrational Fears

Aug 8, 2013
Flickr Photo/roxweb

Maybe you are afraid of clowns or heights, spiders or public speaking. Fears are common, and from an evolutionary stand point fear can be very helpful. But what happens when you are so afraid of something that other find totally harmless, that it cripples you? How can you get over those fears?

Dr. Stacy Welch wants you to be afraid, but it isn’t what you think. Dr. Welch is an exposure therapist helping people work through fears, both rational and irrational. Ross Reynolds sits down with Dr. Welch and discusses where fears come from, how fear can help or hurt us and how to overcome fears. 

Department Of Homeland Security: Necessary Or Needless?

Aug 8, 2013
Flickr Photo/US Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District

The vision of the Department of Homeland Security is to "ensure a homeland that is safe, secure and resilient against terrorism and other hazards." That's according to the mission statement on the Department of Homeland Security’s website.

Last month the Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napalitano resigned to take on the job of running California’s university system. There are now 15 vacant positions at the top of the department, a department that casts a wide net. Sure, you may think of anti-terror units when you think of homeland security but DHS combined 22 different federal departments when it was established in 2002. Ross Reynolds talks with author and fellow at the Center for Global Development Charles Kenny about why he thinks it is time to abolish the DHS.

The Final Countdown: McGinn Vs. Murray In November Election

Aug 7, 2013

Incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn and state Senator Ed Murray are on top in the primary election for mayor of Seattle. Ross Reynolds talks to Ed Murray, the top vote-getter last night. We also hear from KUOW’s David Hyde, who was at Mayor McGinn’s election party last night.

Can’t Live If Living Is Without Harry Nilsson

Aug 7, 2013
RCA Records via Wikimedia (public domain)

Singer-songwriter Harry Nilsson led a long and diverse career in the music business. He is best known for his pop ballad take on the Randy Newman song, “Living Without You.” But he got famous writing arty rock music and hanging out with the Beatles. Ross Reynolds explores the eclectic career of Henry Nilsson.

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl

Aug 7, 2013
Courtesy of Sheryl Wiser

With the hot summer weather, who wants to be stuck in the kitchen cooking dinner? If you’re heading to the farmers market this week, there are a lot of good veggies for an easy summer salad — one you can throw together fast and take outside for a picnic. Ross Reynolds gets tips from Sheryl Wiser of the Puget Sound Fresh program at the Cascade Harvest Coalition on what to buy for a fresh salad.

Checking In With The Head Of WSDOT

Aug 7, 2013
Courtesy of WSDOT

Costs continue to run over for the 520 bridge project. The Washington state Legislature failed to pass a transportation package in June, and last week, the state Transportation Commission voted to increase ferry fares by 6 percent. Ross Reynolds talks about these and other transportation issues with Washington’s Secretary of Transportation Lynn Peterson.

Darlene Barnes' book "Hungry"

  

Imagine a tiny, filthy-at-first kitchen, shockingly bad ingredients and the requirement to prepare two meals a day, five days a week for up to 80 young men. That’s what Darlene Barnes found when she applied for the position of house cook at Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity at the University of Washington. She was new to the area and wanted to continue her career in cooking. But what she got was so much more than a job.

Ross Reynolds talks with Darlene Barnes about her new memoir, “Hungry: What Eighty Ravenous Guys Taught Me about Life, Love, and the Power of Good Food.”

Get To Know Your Neighbor: Stories About The Best And Worst Neighbors

Aug 6, 2013

Tonight millions of Americans will participate in National Night Out. It’s a country-wide effort to build community and fight crime. Streets are closed off for block parties and neighbors are encouraged to get to know each other. For many, it’s the only time they mingle with the neighbors all year. What about you? Do you know your neighbors? Ross Reynolds talks to callers about their neighbors — good and bad.

UW Professor: Is Philosophy Sexist?

Aug 6, 2013
Flickr Photo/mararie

Gender bias and sexual harassment are relatively common in philosophy departments compared to other humanities fields, and less than 20 percent of philosophy faculty members are women. But our guest today says the University of Washington philosophy department is different. KUOW’s Ross Reynolds talks to Sara Goering, a philosophy professor and graduate program director at the University of Washington, about what’s being done to end lingering sexism in philosophy.

Nickelsville Resident Speaks Out About Move

Aug 6, 2013
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

The homeless encampment known as Nickelsville is set to close on September 1st. The city has provided $500,000 to move residents to new homes. But are these new shelters a permanent solution? Nickelsville resident John Jolly says no. He talks to Ross Reynolds about how the transition is going.

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