All Things Considered

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  • Hosted by Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

Hear KUOW and NPR award-winning hosts and reporters from around the globe present some of the nation's best reporting  of the day's events, interviews, analysis and reviews on All Things Considered.

More than 70 years ago, the federal government took land from descendants of West African slaves, known as the Gullah, living in Georgia. Now they're fighting to get it back.

In 1942, they were given just weeks to leave marsh property on the Georgia coast so that the U.S. military could construct an air base for training pilots and conducting anti-submarine flights. Twenty years later, the former base and the land around it were converted into the 2,762-acre Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.

Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy told the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security Tuesday that it took five days before he was informed that a car carrying two agents struck a security barrier outside the White House.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now a story of lost and found. It was 2012. A man from Idaho went fishing on Wyoming's Salt River with his father.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

John Cassinelli says he and his dad were having a nice time.

In New York City, the police department has been re-examining the way it patrols public housing since the shooting of Akai Gurley late last year. Gurley, who was African-American, was unarmed when he was fatally shot by a rookie officer in a Brooklyn housing complex. His death highlighted tensions between police and the people who live in public housing.

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We're going to spend some time now with writer Katherine Heiny. That profession is not something her family expected and, she says, in some ways, neither did she.

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A new understanding of the brain's cerebellum could lead to new treatments for people with problems caused by some strokes, autism and even schizophrenia.

That's because there's growing evidence that symptoms ranging from difficulty with abstract thinking to emotional instability to psychosis all have links to the cerebellum, says Jeremy Schmahmann, a professor of neurology at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital.

This weekend, visitors to the Detroit Institute of Arts buzzed with excitement over a new exhibit — it was a big moment for the once-troubled museum. The DIA spent much of the last two years under threat as its owner, the city of Detroit, looked for ways to emerge from bankruptcy.

Finally, in November, a "grand bargain" was struck. Foundations, private donors and the state of Michigan together raised more than $800 million to help rescue public employee pensions. In return, ownership of the DIA was transferred to a trust — thereby securing its future.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

FEMA has taken the unprecedented step of reopening all Superstorm Sandy flood claims because thousands of homeowners said insurance companies intentionally lowballed damage estimates.

Similar allegations surfaced in 2004 after Hurricane Isabel struck the Mid-Atlantic. To answer critics then, FEMA formalized an appeals process.

That appeals process has gone against Sandy victims almost every time, statistics show.

The two likely Republican presidential front-runners, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, visited New Hampshire this weekend. Though neither has officially declared their candidacy, The Boston Globe's James Pindell says they're giving political reporters a lot to talk about.

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Book Review: 'Sailing The Forest'

Mar 16, 2015
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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As winter takes a final bow, our reviewer Tess Taylor wants to recommend a book of poems that's carried her through this season. It's called "Sailing The Forest" by Scottish poet Robin Robertson.

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