All Things Considered

Monday - Friday, 2:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. on KUOW
Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

Hear KUOW and NPR award-winning hosts and reporters from around the globe present some of the nation's best reporting  of the day's events, interviews, analysis and reviews on All Things Considered.

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Research News
3:37 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Study Finds Human Stem Cells May Help To Treat Patients

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For the first time ever, scientists are reporting that human embryonic stem cells may be helping treat patients. In the medical journal The Lancet, researchers describe how the cells seem to help restore eyesight to some blind people.

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All Tech Considered
3:41 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Microsoft Windows Flaw Let Russian Hackers Spy On NATO, Report Says

Microsoft says it's patching a Windows security flaw cited in a report on alleged spying by Russian hackers.
Ted S. Warren AP

A group of hackers, allegedly from Russia, found a fundamental flaw in Microsoft Windows and exploited it to spy on Western governments, NATO, European energy companies and an academic organization in the United States.

That's according to new research from iSight Partners, a Dallas-based cybersecurity firm.

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Goats and Soda
3:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Ebola Volunteers Are Needed — But Signing On Isn't Easy

A licensed clinician is decontaminated before disrobing at the end of a simulated training session by CDC in Anniston, Ala. Training can take a several weeks, making some employers reluctant to encourage their medical workers to volunteer in the Ebola outbreak.
Brynn Anderson AP

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 4:28 pm

As soon as the Ebola outbreak started to spiral out of control in West Africa, Kwan Kew Lai felt obligated to help.

She's a physician who specializes in infectious disease. And for the last decade, she's dedicated herself to volunteering for international health emergencies. She works part-time at one of Harvard's teaching hospital just to have that flexibility.

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Politics
1:58 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Krugman: Obama More Transformative Than Clinton, Reagan

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
1:58 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Many GOP Candidates Not Commenting On Gay Marriage Wave

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 4:13 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Business
1:30 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Fiery Oil-Train Derailments Prompt Calls For Less Flammable Oil

A fireball goes up at the site of an oil train derailment in Casselton, N.D., in this Dec. 30 photo. The fiery crash left an ominous cloud over the town and led some residents to evacuate.
Bruce Crummy AP

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 1:58 pm

Once a day, a train carrying crude oil from North Dakota's Bakken oil fields rumbles through Bismarck, N.D., just a stone's throw from a downtown park.

The Bakken fields produce more than 1 million barrels of oil a day, making the state the nation's second-largest oil producer after Texas. But a dearth of pipelines means that most of that oil leaves the state by train — trains that run next to homes and through downtowns.

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Pop Culture
2:50 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

The New Food TV: The Era Of Julia Child Packed Its Knives And Went

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 3:52 pm

If you're one of the many addicts to the current crop of food shows, watching a clip of Julia Child — the original French Chef of television — is like visiting a different planet.

You might wonder how long she would last in the gladiator's arena that modern cooking shows have become. Since the original Japanese Iron Chef first appeared on the Food Network here in the U.S. 15 years ago, how-to cooking shows have gradually been displaced by food combat: reality shows that pit chefs against each other.

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Global Health
1:55 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

Liberian Singers Use The Power Of Music To Raise Ebola Awareness

Elliott Adekoya, 31, aka The Milkman, is a DJ at Monrovia's Sky FM radio, pictured here his DJ booth. He is also part of a group of 45 Liberian musicians called the Save Liberia Project. They want to get the word out that Ebola is real, but it is not a death sentence. He says that message, which was propagated early on by the Ministry of Health, actually contributed to the problem.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 3:52 pm

In West Africa, one of the simplest ways to slow the Ebola outbreak is to educate people about how to keep from getting infected with the virus. Now, there are some signs that Ebola awareness is indeed driving down the number of cases in parts of Liberia — and Liberian musicians and DJs may deserve some of the credit.

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Africa
1:55 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

ISIS Advances On Kobani With Additional Fighters, Weapons

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 3:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Global Health
1:55 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

Training Is Key In Lowering Risk For Health Care Workers Treating Ebola

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 3:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
3:08 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

TV Giant Norman Lear Shares Gems From 92 Years Of 'Experience'

In addition to producing TV sitcoms such as All in the Family and The Jeffersons, Norman Lear has also worked as a social and political activist.
AP

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 5:35 am

When All In The Family debuted on CBS back in 1971, it was an instant hit. But it took creator Norman Lear three long years of persistence — right up to the final 20 minutes before the premiere — to convince network executives that it would be a hit, as he tells NPR's Arun Rath. When asked where he got the confidence to keep pushing the same pilot, first to ABC and then to CBS, Lear answered simply:

"Can you say 'beats the **** out of me' on NPR?"

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Music Interviews
2:08 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

Mary Lambert: 'You Change People's Opinions By Opening Your Heart'

Mary Lambert's new album is called Heart On My Sleeve.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 3:33 pm

When Mary Lambert sang the hook for Macklemore & Ryan Lewis' 2012 hit "Same Love," her career transformed. She quickly went from performing at coffee shops in Seattle — "to six people, including my mom," as she tells it — to performing on Ellen, at the MTV Video Music Awards and the Grammys.

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Global Health
2:08 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

Investors Flock To Ebola-Related Companies

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 3:33 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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This Week's Must Read
2:43 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

For This Baseball Season, Roger Angell Has Just The 'Ticket'

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 3:43 pm

"Most of us fans fall in love with baseball when we are children," writes Roger Angell. At any age, though, the ballgame is better with a friendly and knowledgeable companion. I can't think of a better one than Angell.

Now 94, he has written about baseball for over half a century, beginning when the New Yorker magazine sent him to spring training in 1962.

"I have covered this beat in haphazard fashion, following my own inclinations and interests," he writes in Season Ticket about the game in the mid-'80s.

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Parallels
2:43 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Amid Tight Restrictions And Rubble, A Cement Shortage In Gaza

A Palestinian worker checks a truck loaded with bags of cement as it crosses into southern Gaza from Israel last year. Israel has restricted cement supplies to only specific projects.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 2:15 pm

Gaza businessman Maher Abu Ghanema wants to rebuild his currency exchange shop in Gaza City, but because for years Israel has restricted cement supplies to only specific projects, it's been slow going.

"I need at least 3 tons of cement," says Ghanema, who after two weeks of effort found 1 ton. "Whatever we got is from the black market, and it costs four or five times higher than the original price. Plus, it's low-quality."

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