All Things Considered

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  • Hosted by Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

Hear KUOW and NPR award-winning hosts and reporters from around the globe present some of the nation's best reporting  of the day's events, interviews, analysis and reviews on All Things Considered.

A handful of companies are offering parental benefits that go way beyond just paid leave, to include things like surrogacy reimbursement, egg freezing or breast milk shipping for traveling mothers.

As competition for talent heats up, companies see it as a relatively cheap way to recruit, retain and motivate their employee base.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Naomi Wachira performs her song 'African Girl' at the Northwest Folklife Festival at Seattle Center on Sunday, May 29, 2016.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Naomi Wachira writes in one of her songs that she’s “trying to defy everything they said of us, we who have chocolate skin.”

Those words in “African Girl” speak to the clash of culture and identity that Wachira experienced after she moved to the U.S. at age 19.


Screenshot from the trailer for 'Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell.'
YouTube

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle filmmaker Megan Griffiths about her picks for the Seattle International Film Festival. Griffiths recommends "Captain Fantastic" and "Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell."

Griffiths directed "The Night Stalker, which is also playing at SIFF.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The excruciating wait times at Chicago's O'Hare and Midway airports the past couple of weeks have travelers fuming and some city officials looking for other options.

Chicago Alderman Ed Burke is calling on the city to do airport security the way it's done in Kansas City, San Francisco and several smaller airports around the country. He wants to hire a private company to staff the screening checkpoints.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why Microsoft is scaling back its smartphone business and laying off 1,850 employees.

Stanton Gleave hardly fits the stereotype of a modest, keep-to-himself Western rancher.

Standing in a collection of muddy pens taking a break from shearing sheep near his home in tiny Kingston, Utah, Gleave gives an earful about his frustrations with the Bureau of Land Management and environmental groups.

"That's who we're actually fighting with," says Gleave. "They've indoctrinated and got into this BLM and Forest Service 'til a lot of 'em are right up in the head positions now."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Jon Ralston is one of Nevada's top political reporters. But earlier this week, he published a different type of story: a personal account about his child.

On Monday, his 20-year-old went before a judge to request changes to his birth certificate: name and gender.

The judge granted those changes. Madeline is now Jacob; instead of Maddy, Jake. Jon Ralston chronicles the journey of his son — and his own — in The Child I Love.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times reporter Lewis Kamb about SeaTac's former interim City Manager James Payne. An independent report found that Payne wanted a tactical map of where Muslims lived in SeaTac  out of concerns about terrorism. Payne resigned in April, just before the investigation was released.

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