Is The Health Care Overhaul Over? | KUOW News and Information

Is The Health Care Overhaul Over?

Jul 18, 2017

With guest host Anthony Brooks.

With the collapse of the current GOP effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, what’s next?

Over a steak dinner last night, President Trump urged key Republican Senators to finally repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. He didn’t know that two more Senators were about to announce they oppose the bill – effectively killing it. So what now? Mitch McConnell wants a “repeal only” bill, but that could lead to chaos. Others say it’s time to work across party lines to fix healthcare. This hour On Point: Republicans fumble and Obamacare remains the law of the land. — Anthony Brooks

Guests

Jen Haberkorn, senior health care reporter for POLITICO. (@jenhab)

Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for Bloomberg News. (@sahilkapur)

Ezra Levin, co-executive director of Indivisible. (@ezralevin)

W. James Antle III, politics editor at the Washington Examiner. (@jimantle)

From The Reading List

POLITICO: GOP health care bill collapses — “President Donald Trump’s top legislative priority was dealt a potentially fatal blow Monday night as two more Republican senators announced their opposition to the party’s health care overhaul. Trump quickly called on Republicans to simply repeal Obamacare and begin work on a new health care plan, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he would try to do so.”

Bloomberg: House Conservatives Fear Health-Care Deja Vu on Secret Tax Plan — “With a committee markup of a key budget resolution scheduled for Wednesday, leaders of the conservative House Freedom Caucus have demanded details about the tax package and about welfare-spending cuts that GOP leaders have agreed to in principle. But they’ve received no guarantees, and the prospects for seeing specifics ahead of a budget vote appear to be diminishing.”

New York Times: Where Every Senator Stands on the Revised Health Care Bill — “Four Republicans have now said they oppose the revised version of the Senate health care bill, which means the legislation currently does not have enough support to pass, given Democratic opposition. The vote had already been delayed due to the absence of Senator John McCain, who had a blood clot removed on Friday.”

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