Syeda Hasan | KUOW News and Information

Syeda Hasan

Syeda Hasan is a general assignment reporter for KUT News. She previously worked as a reporter at Houston Public Media covering county government, immigrant and refugee communities, homelessness and the Sandra Bland case. Her work has been heard nationally on public radio shows such as “Morning Edition,” “All Things Considered” and “Marketplace.”

She got her start in public radio as an intern at KUT while earning her bachelor’s degree in journalism, with a minor in French, at the University of Texas at Austin where she served as a reporter for the Daily Texan student newspaper.

The upcoming second draft of Austin’s new land development code is expected to eliminate one of its key zoning tools, known as "transect" zones, which focus on a building's form rather than its use.

Austin City Council has voted to sue the state of Texas over a law that blocks the city from enforcing an anti-discrimination housing ordinance.

Expand the Austin Convention Center, a city task force recommended to City Council on Tuesday.  

Service providers are taking a new approach to addressing homelessness in downtown Austin, focusing particularly  on the area around the Austin Resource Center for the Homeless (ARCH). 

Central Texans are expressing solidarity and concern after Saturday’s deadly white supremacist and neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

A bill that would change the way cities and counties collect property taxes is moving forward in the Texas House. On Saturday, lawmakers approved Senate Bill 1 on second reading. The measure would lower the rollback rate, or the annual percent increase in property taxes, from 8 percent to 6 percent. Any increases above that would have to go to the public for a vote.

The bill’s sponsor, Representative Dennis Bonnen, R-Angleton, repeatedly noted that SB 1 does not aim to save taxpayers any money, but it would allow them to weigh in on some increases.

Public input on the city's proposed new land development code has been anything but equal across the city. A map of online feedback shows the comments have been overwhelmingly focused on the wealthiest parts of the city – namely, Central Austin.

Austin City Council is looking at using city-owned buildings as temporary homeless shelters.

The idea comes from Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo, who says overcrowding at downtown shelters has led to harsh conditions for people experiencing homelessness.

Lisa Martinez walks around her newly renovated two-bedroom apartment at Manchaca Village, pointing out her favorite features: the blue accent wall in her living room, a new washer and dryer, and, best of all, a new dishwasher. She says it has made it much easier to clean up after her four kids.

The 33-unit apartment complex in South Austin is the first of 18 public housing properties the housing authority has renovated as part of an ambitious plan announced last year.

Austin's proposed new land development code poses barriers to building what's called "missing-middle" housing, a group of architects and other development experts say.

Austin City Council is set to take up a measure Thursday to encourage affordable housing to be more evenly dispersed throughout the city.

It’s hard to come by vacant land in downtown Austin these days, and the few empty blocks that remain are quickly being scooped up by developers. One of the area’s latest projects is at 308 Guadalupe Street.

Dozens of activists and affordable housing residents gathered on the steps of City Hall on Saturday to speak against proposed cuts to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD.

The rising cost of construction has made it harder to build affordable homes in Central Austin, housing analysts said Thursday at the Home Builders Association of Greater Austin midyear housing forecast event.

Mayor Steve Adler is proposing a new plan for addressing homelessness in downtown Austin – by making tourists chip in.

Tim Mattox doesn’t want to live in Austin, but soon he might not have a choice. Mattox has lived in the River Place neighborhood for 19 years. It’s a community of about 1,100 homes just northwest of the city near Lake Austin. In December, Mattox’s neighborhood is scheduled to be annexed by the city.

Anyone who has driven or taken a bus down Guadalupe Street near UT-Austin knows how bumpy the ride can be.

Though the Drag was repaved just a few years ago, its bus lanes are already marred with potholes. Now, the city has begun making repairs to those lanes.

When we talk about gentrification in Austin, the conversation tends to center around rapid redevelopment on the city’s East Side. But residents of other neighborhoods near the city center have their eyes on the changes that Austin’s new land development code, CodeNEXT, could bring.

When you’re out enjoying some live music in Austin, you’re probably not thinking about the development rules governing the venue you’re in. But Austin’s new land development code, known as CodeNEXT, will have implications for clubs and the city’s other creative spaces. 

As Austin’s new land development code, known as CodeNEXT is being written, city staff and the private sector are working to understand how it will shape future development.

The Austin City Council has approved some changes to the review process for the city’s new land development code, known as CodeNEXT, allowing for additional scrutiny at City Hall before its planned adoption in April of next year.

There is plenty of parking in downtown Austin, but often those spaces aren’t available, according to a parking study released Wednesday by the nonprofit Downtown Austin Alliance. 

Austin is in the process of adopting several plans that will guide the future of development and transportation in the region. The city revealed a new guide Tuesday for the future of street design.

For years, talk of affordable housing has dominated discussions at Austin City Hall. As the cost of living continues to climb, Mayor Steve Adler has expressed concern that the city is on its way to sky-high real estate prices like those in San Francisco. But how much power does the city actually have to influence the housing market?

Austin City Council approved a review today of how fair housing practices measure up in Austin and across Central Texas. 

The federal Fair Housing Act aims to protect people from discrimination when renting, buying or financing a home. Despite those protections, the reality is that housing discrimination persists in many cities. This will be the first time the Austin-Round Rock metro area gets a comprehensive look at this issue across the entire region. 

For years, Central Texas has seen ripples of population growth with Austin at the center.

“Without question, you essentially see this concentric movement outward from the urban core,” State Demographer Lloyd Potter said last month at the Texas Demographic Conference.

As rents for residents and businesses continue to climb, Austin City Council has approved a plan to help the city’s artists afford to keep their venues and creative spaces.

For years, Mike “Truth” Johnston has been pasting his colorful portraits of icons from Michael Jordan to Martin Luther King Jr. on dumpsters, billboards and electrical boxes around the city. 

KUT’s Syeda Hasan caught up with the Austin street artist to learn more about his creative process. 


Austin City Council is set to consider a program that would bring more affordable housing units to the East Side. It’s called a community land trust, and it could create homes that remain affordable for decades to come.

A new traffic study recommends adding sidewalks, bike lanes and bus stops to ease congestion in the Rainey Street neighborhood. 

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