Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Tom Magliozzi, one half of the wisecracking Car Talk duo known as "Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers," has died from complications of Alzheimer's disease. He was 77.

Car Talk Executive Producer Doug Berman sent this note Monday:

"I have the sad duty to report today that Tom Magliozzi, one of the hosts of Car Talk, passed away this morning due to complications of Alzheimer's Disease.

This hasn't been the best of days for the Washington Redskins.

First, one of the team buses crashed en route to Minnesota, where the Redskins were to play the Vikings.

ESPN says:

A new United Nations report is warning that fossil fuels must be entirely phased out by the end of the century in order to avoid dangerous and irreversible damage to the Earth's climate.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says the world faces "severe, pervasive and irreversible" consequences if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut to zero by 2100.

Examples of "irreversible" change include a runaway melt of the Greenland ice cap that would trigger devastating sea-level rise and could swamp coastal cities and disrupt agriculturally critical monsoons.

Two Kenyans have taken the men's and women's titles at the New York City Marathon: Wilson Kipsang with an unofficial time of 2 hours, 10 minutes, 59 seconds, and Mary Keitany finishing 2 hours, 25 minutes, 7 seconds after the start.

Kipsang, a former world-record holder, has now won in Berlin, London and New York within a 13-month span, The Associated Press says.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

The breakaway regions of Donetsk and Luhansk in eastern Ukraine have defied Kiev by holding elections today aimed at legitimizing their self-declared republics. They say exit polls show militia leader Alexander Zakharchenko winning 80 percent of the vote for prime minister of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic.

Zakharchenko, a 38-year-old former electrician, declared himself premier of the region back in August.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

A suspected suicide bomb attack on the Pakistani side of a tense border post with India has killed at least 45 people and wounded another 100, a senior official says.

"According to initial information it was a suicide attack," Inspector General of Punjab Police, Mushtaq Sukhera, told local television channels, according to Reuters.

"When ... security was a bit relaxed, the suicide attacker blew himself up near a restaurant," Sukhera said, who said many more were wounded.

Electricity has been restored in Bangladesh a day after the impoverished South Asian country was thrust into darkness by a nationwide outage.

The country's energy grid was fully restored, and any further problems that may arise would be for "local reasons," Junior Power Minister Nasrul Hamid told reporters, according to The Associated Press.

Michael Alsbury, the co-pilot killed during a test flight of Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo is being described as an expert pilot and engineer who had 15 years of flying experience, much of it on experimental aircraft.

Alsbury, 39, was killed Friday when the prototype of the reusable space plane, designed for suborbital tourist flights, apparently broke apart in midair over the Mojave Desert. Pilot Peter Siebold, 43, managed to eject and parachuted to safety. Siebold is described as alert and talking.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

A judge in Maine has turned down a request by state officials seeking authority to compel nurse Kaci Hickox to remain in her home for the duration of a 21-day incubation for Ebola. Since returning from West Africa, where she treated Ebola patients, Hickox has refused to accept a voluntary quarantine.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Burkina Faso's military appears to have taken control of the African nation shortly after longtime President Blaise Compaore, who had ruled since staging a coup in 1987, agreed to resign as part of what he said was a plan to hold elections in 90 days.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports that the country's armed forces chief, Gen. Honore Traore, announced on Friday that he was taking charge, but it wasn't clear whether his role would be as interim leader or something more permanent.

Officials in Hawaii are sending National Guard troops to the town of Pahoa on the Big Island, where a lava flow is creeping toward a main road, threatening to cut off the community.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said 83 troops have been sent to the town of fewer than 1,000 to help provide security. They are to aid in a road block and with other safety issues, The Associated Press says.

"These are local troops, people from the community. They'll be here working to take care of their family and friends," Oliveira said.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Eric Frein, the man who allegedly shot and killed a police officer and wounded another before leading authorities on a massive 48-day manhunt through rural Pennsylvania, appeared in court today appearing thin and bruised from his weeks on the run.

Boston's longest-serving mayor, Thomas Michael Menino, who held the job for more than two decades until stepping aside earlier this year, has died. He was 71.

The U.S. economy grew at the solid pace of 3.5 percent for the third quarter, helped along by gains in business investment, exports and a big jump in military spending, the Commerce Department says.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Hours after Kaci Hickox defiantly breached a voluntary quarantine for possible Ebola by going on a bike ride, Gov. Paul LePage threatened to use "the full extent" of his authority to compel the nurse to remain in isolation.

"I was ready and willing — and remain ready and willing — to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected," LePage said in a statement.

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