Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

As many as 13,000 people in the U.K. are victims of modern slavery, including sex trafficking, those "imprisoned" as domestic helpers, factory workers and on fishing boats, according to a new analysis release by Britain's Home Office.

Police in Ferguson, Mo., arrested 15 people overnight amid continued, though mostly peaceful, protests following a grand jury's decision earlier this week not to indict white police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of unarmed black youth Michael Brown.

Small protests were also held in Oakland, Calif., Seattle and Chicago.

Those arrested in Ferguson — all but one residing out-of-state — were charged with disturbing the peace.

A court in Egypt dismissed murder charges against former President Hosni Mubarak over the killing of hundreds of anti-government protesters during a 2011 Arab Spring uprising that ousted the long-time strongman.

Roberto Gómez Bolaños, a popular Mexican comedic actor and screenwriter known by the nickname "Chespirito," has died at age 85 after a long illness, Latin Times reports.

The newspaper says Bolaños died of heart failure in Cancun.

The Associated Press notes: "His morning show was a staple for preschoolers, much like Captain Kangaroo in the United States.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, who was suspended indefinitely after a video surfaced earlier this year that showed him hitting his then-fiancee, has won an appeal and will be reinstated by the NFL.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

More than 60 people are dead and as many wounded in an attack on a mosque in northern Nigeria as worshipers were attending Friday prayers.

The BBC says three explosions were reported at the mosque in Kano, and that the attackers also turned gunfire on the worshipers.

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

A gunman who fired more than 100 rounds into government buildings in Austin, Texas, and tried to set fire to the Mexican consulate early this morning is dead.

Kate McGee reports for member station KUT that initially officers thought the man might also be wearing an explosive vest, but after a bomb squad examined the body, determined that he was not.

Black Friday is in full swing in U.S. stores and online, with shoppers across the country hoping to snatch up Christmas bargains.

The National Retail Federation forecasts a 4.1 percent increase in holiday sales over the same period last year, bringing the total to $616.9 billion. It would be the biggest jump in sales since 2011. The NRF has a breakdown of shopping behavior last year posted here.

A video of an Iranian woman defying the country's laws by dancing in a Tehran's subway train has gone viral on the Internet in recent days.

The unidentified woman, who also loses her hijab head covering during the dance, gyrates wildly to a song the British pop group Little Mix as fellow passengers look on.

OPEC's decision not to cut production continues to reverberate through global oil markets, with the price of Europe's benchmark Brent crude falling to a four-year low today — bad news for petroleum exporters in the Middle East and Russia, but good news for nearly everyone else.

Thailand's military junta has apparently blocked domestic access to a scathing new report from U.S.-based Human Rights Watch which describes the country as having fallen into an "apparently bottomless pit" since Army Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha seized power six months ago.

The World Trade Organization has received the unanimous backing of its 160 member nations for a first-ever multilateral trade deal, an agreement that has been years in the making and that the organization claims could add $1 trillion annually to global commerce.

Two teenagers who were found hanging from a tree outside a village in northern India in May in an apparent rape-and-murder may have taken their own lives, Indian officials now say.

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

At least five people are dead in the Afghan capital, Kabul, after after a suicide bombing attack on a British embassy vehicle. A guesthouse run by a foreign aid agency in the diplomatic area of the city also came under attack.

The BBC says that "a British worker and an Afghan member of staff among those killed.

"The Briton who died was a member of the embassy security team, as was another UK national who was wounded.

Update at 5:50 p.m. ET

OPEC oil ministers have agreed to keep production levels steady, virtually ensuring continued low prices at the gas pump and lower costs for jet fuel that could translate into cheaper air-ticket prices.

Reuters reports: "Benchmark Brent futures settled at $72.58 a barrel, down $5.17, after hitting a four-year low of $71.25 earlier in the session. The contract was on track for its biggest monthly fall since 2008. U.S. crude was last down $4.64 at $69.05 a barrel."

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