Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The Elgin Marbles, a collection of classical Greek sculptures that has been housed by the British Museum in London for nearly 200 years, will go on loan to Russia in a move Athens, which has long demanded their return, has called "an affront."

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras said in a statement, according to the BBC: "We Greeks are one with our history and civilization, which cannot be broken up, loaned out, or conceded."

A former Chinese domestic security chief has been arrested and expelled from the Communist Party on charges of bribery and leaking state secrets. Zhou Yongkang, who has been under investigation for months, becomes the highest-ranking leader to become ensnared in the country's high-profile crackdown on corruption.

Super Typhoon Hagupit, briefly downgraded before regaining strength, is set to smash into the Philippine coast on Saturday. The massive storm is already forcing tens of thousands of people to flee its predicted path, which might include a direct hit on the capital, Manila.

The Pentagon says it launched a mission in Yemen last month to snatch hostages from al-Qaida-affiliated captors, but that they failed to rescue British-born American Luke Somers among others because they "were not present at the targeted location."

In a written statement released today, Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said the operation involved ground and air components and was conducted in cooperation with the Yemeni military. It said details of the operation remain classified.

A former Texas justice of the peace has been found guilty of capital murder in the shooting deaths of a district attorney, the DA's wife and an assistant prosecutor in a rural suburb of Dallas last year.

Eric Williams, 47, faces a possible death sentence for killing Cynthia McLelland, the wife of slain Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland. He has also been charged separately in the killings of Mike McLelland and prosecutor Mark Hasse, according to The Associated Press.

China says it will halt the controversial practice of harvesting human organs for transplant from executed prisoners beginning on Jan. 1 in what The New York Times describes as "the firmest deadline given to date for ending" the practice.

Update at 9:35 a.m. ET

NASA's Orion spacecraft, which could one day send astronauts to Mars, is stuck on terra firma for at least another day after the space agency's mission control was unable to satisfactorily resolve a number of issues before a 9:45 a.m. ET launch window closed.

In Hong Kong, thousands of pro-democracy protesters wearing hard hats and masks clashed with police as they attempted to storm the office of the territory's leader, who they have repeatedly demanded step down.

Chanting "Surround government headquarters!" and "Open the road!" students marched toward buildings in Admiralty, next to Hong Kong's central business district, according to Reuters.

Kabul's police chief is stepping down after a series of deadly militant attacks on foreigners that have shaken the capital in recent days.

Black Friday shopping at brick-and-mortar stores in the United States was down about 7 percent from a year ago, according to ShopperTrak, but more purchases on Thanksgiving Day nearly made up the difference. Meanwhile, online retailers recorded double-digit year-on-year increases in sales.

ShopperTrak says Friday store sales hit $9.1 billion, but that shoppers spent $3.2 billion on Thanksgiving — a 24 percent increase for sales on that day from over last year. Overall, it represented a 0.5 percent drop from last year.

At least two people were reportedly killed in Cairo's Tahrir Square and 15 others wounded as police sought to disperse a rally protesting a court's decision to drop murder charges against former Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak.

Update at 2:45 p.m. ET

The mayor of Ferguson, Mo., says he plans to launch a number of initiatives to calm tensions in the the city in the wake of the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

James Knowles, speaking at a news conference today, said the city was creating a civilian review board that would provide input on police affairs. He also said the city would begin a scholarship program to recruit more black officers in the town where African-Americans make up more than half the population but only a handful of the police force.

Mark Strand, a former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner whose verse is recognized for its wit and introspection, has died at age 80 from cancer, according to his daughter and a close family friend.

Taiwan's Prime Minister Jiang Yi-huah has resigned his post after the ruling Kuomintang party (KMT) experienced a crushing defeat at the polls in local elections.

Saturday's polls, widely seen as a referendum on President Ma Ying-jeou ahead of presidential elections two years from now, resulted in the KMT losing key districts across the island. The KMT has dominated Taiwanese politics since nationalist Chinese forces retreated there in the face of Communist advances on the mainland in the late 1940s.

For the second time in as many days, a foreign guesthouse in the Afghan capital came under attack by Taliban suicide bombers and gunmen.

NPR's Sean Carberry reports that police initially believed two or three militants entered the compound in Kabul's western Karte Seh district. He said one South African woman who was a resident at the house and managed to escape told him that as many as 12 people, including children, were trapped inside. Later, Reuters quoted an Afghan official as saying "all three" attackers were dead.

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