Sasha Ingber | KUOW News and Information

Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, The Two-Way, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

She holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

His name is Johan.

He drank a bottle of milk and played with a purple ball as he waited for the immigration judge, The Associated Press reported.

John W. Richardson, the judge at the Phoenix courthouse, said he was "embarrassed to ask" if the defendant understood the proceedings. "I don't know who you would explain it to, unless you think that a 1-year-old could learn immigration law," he told Johan's attorney.

"The debate, if it continues, will continue without my involvement," the woman who accused Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of groping her years ago said in a statement on Friday.

After the 18-year-old allegation reemerged this spring, she asked media outlets to refrain from publishing her name and from contacting her as their coverage continued on the accusation.

Updated at 6:30 a.m. ET on Monday

Dozens of people are presumed dead in flooding and landslides triggered by massive rainfall in Japan's southwest, and the numbers are expected to increase, Japanese officials said Monday.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a self-described feminist, is now fielding questions about what happened with a female reporter on a summer day in 2000.

"I've been reflecting very carefully on what I remember from that incident almost 20 years ago and again... I feel I am confident that I did not act inappropriately," he told reporters in Toronto on Thursday.

Protesters gathered in major cities and small towns across the United States to denounce President Trump's immigration policies.

The "Families Belong Together" marches were planned in response to the administration's policy of separating children from their parents at the southern border.

The streets of Annapolis filled on Friday as people gathered to mourn the loss of five Capital Gazette employees, who were gunned down in their newsroom on Thursday.

The Maryland state flag was lowered to half-staff, and outside the building where the shooting took place, people left flowers, handwritten notes and American flags.

Sports fans may be tuning into the World Cup, but a kangaroo stole the show at a soccer match in Australia's capital.

The mammal bounded onto a stadium field in Canberra on Saturday at half-time, in a match between the Belconnen United "Blue Devils" and the Canberra Football Club.

Then the eastern gray kangaroo leaped back on the field during the second half of the game.

Rain has continued to fall in northern Thailand as attempts to find 12 boys and their soccer coach in a flooded cave grow more desperate.

The boys, aged 11 to 16, disappeared Saturday evening after soccer practice. Their possessions were found outside of Tham Luang cave, near a sign that warned visitors not to enter because of flooding in the rainy season.

Poland is taking steps to soften a controversial law that means anyone who accuses the nation of complicity during the Holocaust could be handed a prison sentence of up to three years.

President Andrzej Duda signed the bill into law in February, after it was proposed by the ruling right-wing Law and Justice party. He said the law protected Polish interests "so that we are not slandered as a state and as a nation."

Iran's capital has been racked by protests this week over a plunge in the value of the country's currency, the rial. Crowds at one point shut down Tehran's sprawling Grand Bazaar, an economic center and a place where the 1979 revolution gained footing.

Rescue crews have been frantically searching for 12 boys and their soccer coach in a sprawling cave complex in northern Thailand that flooded after heavy rains. Despite two days and numerous setbacks, Thai officials believe they are still alive.

The boys and their coach were thought to have entered the cave complex in Chiang Rai province on Saturday afternoon.

They typically train every weekend on a nearby field. But when one of the boys didn't return from soccer practice that day, his mother notified authorities and the search began, according to media reports.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced on Saturday that his government's ceasefire with the Taliban will be extended another day, even as a suicide bombing killed and injured dozens.

A Trump administration policy of separating children from their parents on the U.S. border has prompted a crescendo of criticism among religious leaders.

They span different faiths, denominations and ages. Some of them have also helped the president gain support for his base.

The neighbor who attacked Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, breaking six of his ribs, was sentenced to 30 days in prison by a federal court on Friday.

It was a November day in the city of Bowling Green when Rene Boucher, a physician, says he lost his temper over debris that had piled up near the property line between his home and Paul's. When he saw the Republican senator outside, he tackled him — resulting in broken ribs and bouts of pneumonia.

The Eiffel Tower is being retrofitted with bulletproof glass, the latest measure to protect the Paris site and visitors from potential terrorist attacks.

The panels are nearly 10 feet high and more than 2 inches thick. They will bookend the monument at its north and south ends, running parallel to the Seine River and Avenue Gustave-Eiffel. At the east and west sides, metal fencing has been installed to help stop any vehicles that try to ram into the grounds.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

A Moscow prison has been beautified and accessorized as hundreds of thousands of soccer fans travel to Russia for the World Cup, opposition leader Alexei Navalny quipped Thursday upon his release from custody.

A vocal critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, Navalny was freed just ahead of the opening match between Russia and Saudi Arabia.

A police chief and two officers in a small Miami community framed a 16-year-old boy for four burglaries to keep up a perfect score on crime statistics, federal prosecutors said.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Wednesday that he expects North Korea to take steps toward major nuclear disarmament within the next two-and-a-half years.

"Most certainly in the president's first term," he said, speaking to a pool of journalists in Seoul, South Korea, where he was meeting his South Korean and Japanese counterparts.

It was a hug that put sportsmanship on full display.

A lot hung on the game: The winning team would play for the Minnesota state championship for baseball. Mounds View, a public high school in a Minneapolis suburb, was leading Totino-Grace, a nearby Catholic high school.

Totino-Grace's Jack Kocon stepped up to bat, meeting eyes with pitcher Ty Koehn, his longtime friend. Koehn, reportedly the star player of his team, the Mustangs, struck out Kocon to win the game and move ahead to the championship.

In the era of "fake news," Facebook is doing away with its "Trending" news section. At the same time, it is testing new products aimed at delivering news from trustworthy sources.

The June cover of Vogue Arabia featuring a Saudi princess behind the wheel of a convertible is facing backlash.

The photo was intended to celebrate the trailblazing women of Saudi Arabia ahead of the lifting of a ban on women driving, on June 24. But the royal family has been accused of jailing female rights activists who for years fought for the right to drive.

Two days after staging his death with the help of Ukrainian authorities, Russian journalist Arkady Babchenko is explaining how the plot unfolded and why he went along with it.

Danish Parliament voted Thursday to ban garments covering the face in public places: effectively outlawing the burqa and niqab, coverings worn by some Muslim women.

The bill was presented by Denmark's center-right governing coalition. It received 75 votes from members of parliament in favor of the ban and 30 votes in opposition. Another 74 members of parliament were absent for the vote.

Updated at 7:01 p.m. ET

Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in all 67 counties on Saturday in preparation for Subtropical Storm Alberto.

Updated 2:19 p.m. ET

The people of Ireland voted overwhelmingly to repeal its restrictive abortion ban by changing the country's constitution.

The results were announced Saturday evening, local time: Out of the more than 2 million people who participated in Friday's referendum to overturn the Eighth Amendment, which bans nearly all abortion in the socially conservative country, 66.4 percent voted for repeal and 33.6 percent voted against it.

Syria's military announced Monday that it cleared Damascus and its suburbs of the last elements of the Islamic state militant group, ISIS.

According to government reports, the Syrian army had driven ISIS out of the rebel group's last remaining strongholds in southern Damascus; this marks the first time that President Bashar al-Assad's government has total control of the capital since the rebellion began in 2011.

About 5 a.m. on Saturday, a police department in Ohio got an unusual call. A man reported that he was being followed home by a pig.

At least six prominent defenders of women's rights in Saudi Arabia were detained this week, six weeks before the kingdom's ban on women from driving is due to be lifted June 24.

A Chinese archaeologist who identified a long-lost clay army consisting of 8,000 soldiers died Wednesday, according to China's state media.

Zhao Kangmin first laid eyes on fragments of terra cotta warriors in 1974. Farmers some 20 miles from China's central city of Xi'an were digging a well and struck into the pieces.

Updated at 8:35 p.m. ET

Lawmakers in Chechnya submitted a proposal on Friday that would allow Russian President Vladimir Putin to run for office in 2024, giving him another six years at Russia's helm.

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