Sara Lerner

Reporter

In her role as reporter and afternoon news anchor, Sara responds to events as they unfold: from an approaching tsunami to unbearable gridlock during the Alaskan Way viaduct closure. Sara's reporting has covered a range of subjects including the Dalai Lama's Seattle visit, local controversies about racy coffee shops, and the ups and downs of real estate in the Puget Sound region.

In 2009, Sara was awarded a KUOW Program Venture Fund grant which supported her four–part documentary on human trafficking in Washington state. In 2008, her piece, "No More Lemon Bars For Voters," brought Sara a national award from Public Radio News Directors Incorporated. Sara continues to produce stories for NPR and radio shows like Studio 360 and Voice Of America. She joined the station in 2005.

Prior to her radio career, Sara researched cacao in the Costa Rican rainforest, worked for a Palestinian/Israeli co–existence group in Tel Aviv and visited nearly every country in Latin America. Her interest in travel stems from the same place as her passion for reporting: an intense curiosity about the world around us and the people who inhabit it. She says her motivation as a journalist is to continue asking questions and telling stories, truthfully.

Ways To Connect

Flickr Photo/Christian Sinderman (CC BY-NC-ND)

Those caught up in it call it "the life." It usually involves a pimp, coercion and prostitution.

For young victims of sex trafficking, getting out of that life and building a new one can be a monumental task. Having a rap sheet for prostitution makes it  incredibly difficult to apply for jobs, or housing, or school — the things it takes to start over.

Back in May 2011, Laura was in the habit of whispering at work – even when talking about the weather. She was a manager at T-Mobile at a time when the company was suffering deep layoffs.

She was a “layoff survivor” – her colleagues were losing their jobs, workloads were shifting, and she was in fear of her own position. She declined to release her full name.

uwmedicine.org

“Abruptly and brutally.”

That’s how Dr. Abe Bergman described the announcement by administrators to close some of the clinics at Harborview Medical Center. He said staff members were told that some of the primary care clinics housed at the hospital would close in July.

As the year winds down, The Record looks back at some of our favorite KUOW stories from 2013 and beyond.

Community activist Nestora Salgado lives in Renton, normally.

She grew up in Olinala, Mexico, and over the last few years she’s been returning frequently and getting involved in the community – so involved that she ended up running a legal community police force. Mexican law allows indigenous communities to form such groups.

Before gay marriage was legalized in Washington state, wedding planner Jenny Harding organized about two same-sex weddings a year.

Last year? Sixteen. Three were out of state, from California, Oregon and Vermont (where same-sex marriage is also legal).

Wilcox Farms, where a man was buried under tons of corn on Monday when a silo gave way, was cited for six violations last summer that could have put workers in serious danger, according to inspection reports.

Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus

Three weeks after Election Day, supporters of a measure to increase the minimum hourly wage to $15 in SeaTac celebrated their victory. With the last batch of votes counted, King County declared the proposition had passed with more than 1 percent of the vote.

A Salvador Dali etching. A $10,000 dollar painting from American realist John Englehart. And earlier this month, antique artifacts from tribal ceremonies throughout Africa, worth $11,000.

Every year in January, volunteers fan out across King County to count the number of people who are homeless. In February, the great backyard bird count tracks birds and species all over the world.

On Thursday, it was Washington state’s bicycle count, when hundreds of people across the state stood on corners and counted cyclists, pedestrians and others using non-motorized method of transportation like in-line skates and skateboards.

There are now more than two million Syrian refugees and some local nonprofits are working to help them. Rita Zawaideh is a Seattle businesswoman who travels to Jordan every other month to bring refugees medical supplies. She started the nonprofit Salaam Cultural Museum in Seattle in 1996.

She recently returned from one of those trips. She and other volunteers saw thousands of patients and handed out hundreds of pounds of medicine.

From Anacortes, Wash., you get the classic, gorgeous views of the San Juan Islands.  But tourists mostly breeze by this city, thinking of it as just the gateway to greater places. Anacortes does have its own thing going, though. It’s an unusual mix of a real working city with super lovely landscape.

FBI

The man law enforcement have identified as the deceased gunman who opened fire at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. Monday was arrested in Seattle in May of 2004 for shooting up a car.   

According to police reports, Aaron Alexis was living with his grandmother in Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood that year. A construction crew was building a house next door, and one of the workers told police that Alexis stared at them every morning for a month leading up to the incident.

Plans to build an enormous beverage bottling plant in Skagit County, Wash., have been halted. The company behind a proposed facility has backed out of the project.

Seattle’s nonprofit health care system, Group Health, has said they won’t be offering abortion coverage in the new health care exchange.

But they also said women will be able to get an abortion without paying more.

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