Ryan Kellman | KUOW News and Information

Ryan Kellman

Ryan Kellman is a visual journalist and producer for NPR's Skunk Bear, a visual science blog and Youtube channel. Skunk Bear's goal is to connect people of all backgrounds with the joys and challenges of science — its products and its process — through creative storytelling.

Before joining Skunk Bear full time, Kellman worked as a photographer and photo editor on NPR's Science Desk. In his first months at the job, Kellman worked on NPR's Peabody award winning coverage of the 2014 ebola outbreak. Since then he has covered a range of subjects from hip hop in Senegal to snowy owls in Canada.

Kellman has won several notable awards as a photographer and videographer. He is a Fulbright Grant recipient, he has received a John Collier Award in Documentary Photography, a SEA Grant, and two first place wins in the WHNPA's Eyes of History Awards. He holds a Master's degree from Ohio University's School of Visual Communication and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute.

Hundreds of years before solar viewing glasses were readily available, scientists and casual spectators could still enjoy these rare celestial events without frying their eyeballs. They'd use a combination of pinholes and mirrors to redirect the sun's rays onto a screen.

The modern Planet of the Apes reboot begins with a research chimpanzee being raised in an American home. It's a pretty plausible premise — that exact scenario has played out in the real world many times.

The overwhelming majority of bats are friends of humanity. They gobble up the insects that bite us and ruin our crops. They pollinate flowers and they replant forests by spreading seeds around. But as agriculture overtakes rain forests and jungles, humans have come into conflict with one bat species: the common vampire bat.