Ruby de Luna | KUOW News and Information

Ruby de Luna


Year started with KUOW: 1994

Ruby de Luna is a features reporter at KUOW. She had originally planned to go into TV, but ditched the idea after discovering public radio.  Ruby has reported on immigrant communities. She currently covers health care issues.  

Ruby is a transplant from Taipei, Taiwan. She holds a BA in communication from Seattle Pacific University. 

In the age of computer/digital audio editing, Ruby is proud to be one of the few old–schoolers who can still edit tape with a razor blade. In her free time she practices her knife skills on new recipes. 

Ways to Connect

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson smiles during a news conference about President Trump's new executive order Monday, March 6, 2017, in Seattle. The new ban, which takes effect March 16, halts travel for 90 days for residents of Iran, Libya,
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The White House may have issued a new travel order, but the same legal concerns from the original one remain.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson says he’s reviewing the new executive order to see how it affects the state’s suit against the federal government.

A bill requiring hospitals to inform patients they may be eligible for charity care has passed the Washington State House Thursday.

By law, Washington hospitals can’t turn away people seeking emergency care because they’re not able to pay. The law also requires hospitals to screen low income patients to see if they’re eligible for charity care. 

Ben Keita, 18, was found hanged in the woods in Lake Stevens, a suburb north of Seattle.
Ibrahima Keita

Police continue to investigate the death of a Muslim teenager who was found hanging from a high branch in the woods north of Seattle.

Ben Keita, 18, was found hanged in the woods in Lake Stevens, a suburb north of Seattle.
Ibrahima Keita

A Lake Stevens family is asking the FBI to investigate the death of their teenage son. The young man, an African-American Muslim, was found hanged in the woods. The circumstances surrounding his death remain unclear.

world relief refugees immigration immigrant
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The effects of President Trump’s travel ban have not been limited to immigrants entering the U.S. Nonprofit groups that resettle refugees are also facing uncertainty.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson prepares to talk to the media about a federal judge's ruling on the Trump refugee order Friday, Feb. 3, 2017.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

President Trump’s immigration ban will remain on hold.

A three-judge panel unanimously denied the federal government’s appeal to reinstate parts of the executive order barring immigrants and refugees of seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the country.

Demonstrators opposed to President Trump's order barring travelers and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the U.S. march through Los Angeles International Airport Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.
AP Photo/Reed Saxon

A federal appeals court heard arguments Tuesday in the legal dispute over President Donald Trump’s immigration ban.

At issue is whether a lower court’s ruling that temporary halted the ban should stay in place.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson prepares to talk to the media about a federal judge's ruling on the Trump refugee order Friday, Feb. 3, 2017.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

A federal court judge in Seattle has ordered a temporary halt to President Donald Trump’s immigration ban — nationwide.

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson has filed a lawsuit against the Trump Administration. The suit alleges the Executive Order is harming Washington residents and damaging the state's economy.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Washington state is the first in the nation to challenge President Trump’s travel ban. Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed a federal lawsuit, saying major portions of the executive order are unconstitutional.  

In the state’s complaint filed Monday, Ferguson says the administration’s policy discriminates based on country of origin and religion. 

It’s been an emotional weekend for Washington residents hoping to reunite with family as officials tried to enforce President Trump’s travel ban on immigrants and refugees arriving from certain predominantly Muslim countries.

Democrats have condemned the travel ban. Reaction from the state’s Republican congressional delegation has been somewhat mixed.

Community health leaders like Teresita Batayola of ICHS worry about the future of ACA.
Courtesy of ICHS

The deadline to sign up for health coverage is coming up at the end of the month. So far, more Americans have enrolled for health insurance this year than in previous years. At the same time, Congress has taken steps to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Ron Chew works at the International Community Health Services. He holds a portrait of his parents. His grandfather came to the U.S. illegally during the Chinese Exclusion Act.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The Trump Administration’s talk about changing immigration enforcement is causing anxiety for thousands of immigrants in Washington state who, until now, have had protection.

Even for people who are pillars of the community, the national rhetoric is bringing back memories.

Volunteers help with citizenship forms.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

People started lining up in Seattle several hours before the city’s big immigration workshop opened its doors at noon Friday.

The city planned the event to coincide with Inauguration Day to emphasize that Seattle would remain a welcoming city for immigrants and refugees under the Trump administration.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Long before Seattle was a sanctuary city, churches here sheltered immigrants from Central America.

Carlos Mejia and his wife Ercilia moved here in 1983 from El Salvador, which was in the throes of a civil war. Patricia was seven months pregnant at the time; she later gave birth on the third floor of University Baptist Church.

Emily Phillips is Marination's Commissary Manager. She and her crew of 10 cook the rice, marinate the meats and do all the food prep for the restaurants.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Food trucks — you see them everywhere.  

Marination is one of the early pioneers of the Seattle food truck business, serving Hawaiian-Korean food. To feed its customers, Marination goes through 100 pounds of rice, 40 pounds of kimchi and 300 pounds of chicken, pork and beef on a typical busy summer day.  

Rally organizers handed out signs declaring Washington a 'hate-free state.'
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Washington elected officials who came out to denounce racism and hate found themselves in a verbal match against protesters.

What started as a show of support for members of a Redmond mosque was disrupted by residents opposing a proposed juvenile detention center in Seattle.

Washington state is suing agro-chemical giant Monsanto. For decades Monsanto was the sole producer of PCB, an organic chlorine compound. The state is seeking damages and cleanup costs associated with the chemicals.

Mr. Sea the penguin receives laser treatment at Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo. Mr. Sea
Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren/Woodland Park Zoo

How do you treat a penguin with arthritis?

First, you watch him walk.

Will the Affordable Care Act become history under the Trump Administration? Republicans want to see it go or replaced with something else.

But some people, like Harriet Prudhomme, worry about what’s going to happen if it does.  

From left: LeCriesha Lewis, Elizabeth Haile and Mia Wolde-Maskell at the Seattle Union Station, one of the few in-person voting centers in King County.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Today’s the last day to mail in your ballot or drop it off at one of the drop boxes around King County.  Also, there are a few places where you can vote in person.

Paige McGrath has been verifying voter signatures at King County Elections since 2010.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Ever wonder what happens after you mail your ballot? If you live in King County, chances are, your ballot was inspected by someone like Paige McGrath. She and hundreds of elections employees process thousands of voter ballots during election season. 

Brittany Johnson says the Freedom Foundation contacted her by mail to tell her she didn't have to be a member of SEIU. She said it was never clear how the right-wing organization got her information, and she wants her privacy.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

UPDATE 10/31/16, 2 p.m. 

On Friday the Washington state Attorney General’s Office said it filed a complaint in Thurston County Superior Court against the Freedom Foundation for campaign finance violations. The attorney general specifically said Freedom Foundation had failed to report its spending to oppose Initiative 1501.

  When Mark Manuel’s family moved to Washington State in 1991, Bellevue had a certain reputation.

“All I can remember about Bellevue growing up was, it’s white and it’s rich, you know, there’s no real reason to go across the bridge,” said Manuel.

Under new crisis intervention policies, Seattle Police Officer Louis Chan partners with Mariah Andrignis, a social worker.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

It’s 11 in the morning. Officer Louis Chan is scanning through the 911 calls that have come through, waiting to be handled. 

One call stands out: A patient with a history of attempted suicide didn’t show up for an appointment. The case manager was concerned and called 911.

Dakota Keogh and her daughter Adrienne, who applies makeup. Keogh recently came out as transgender to her family.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Dakota Keogh remembers that age when boys and girls start to go their separate ways, about four or five.

“I felt like I got caught in the wrong tide,” she says. “I wanted to be over there.”

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)/

It’s that time of year again — the start of flu season.

Health officials say don’t wait: Get a flu shot. Already, they’re getting reports of small clusters of people with the flu. 

A task force to address King County’s heroin epidemic will release recommendations this week that could include a safe consumption site for people who use drugs.

The group will make another recommendation: creating a buprenorphine program at the site of Seattle’s Needle Exchange program.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

West Seattle’s Delridge neighborhood has been struggling for years to get a grocery store in the area. It hasn’t been able to attract major retailers for various reasons. 

birth control contraception
Flickr Photo/Raychel Mendez (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

People’s medical records and personal information are protected under federal law, but there’s a loophole in the law that allows employers to access information about employees’ health.

You know those wellness programs that employers use to help improve workers’ health?  They hold a wealth of information about employees: their lifestyles, diet, and medication, including birth control. 

Rebecca Crimmins, 61, spent two years trying to find a job. During that time, her mother died and she got cancer. She must continue working to pay off her medical bills.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Eight years have passed since the Great Recession. It almost seems like a distant event. But older workers haven’t completely recovered despite signs of boom times.