Ross Reynolds | KUOW News and Information

Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross creates community conversations (like the Ask A events) that supplement and complement KUOW's on-air and on-line services. He produces the occasional arts and news feature. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013 and KUOW's Seattle Afternoon from 1988 to 1992.

Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. He led  KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted  the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has been an East-West Center media fellow in the Kingdom of Tonga, an  East-West Center Jefferson Fellow in Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia and a RIAS Berlin Visiting American Journalist in Berlin, Brussels, Prague, Dresden. In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and as a reporter at the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about wildfires in British Columbia and the impact there of fires across the border in Washington. 

Mud Bay workers sign a 'declaration' of worker ownership during a company meeting on Thursday, Aug. 20.
Mud Bay

Ross Reynolds asks the co-CEOs of Mud Bay pet stores why they decided to turn a chunk of the company over to their employees. Last week at the company’s annual Mudstock meeting, employees signed a "declaration" of ownership.

robbiebach.com

Ross Reynolds talks to Robbie Bach, who retired from Microsoft in 2010 at age 49 after leading the company’s successful foray into video games with the XBox. 

Tomatoes at Queen Anne Farmers Market.
Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes to the Queen Anne Farmers Market to talk with cook, author and chef Becky Selengut about what's fresh for your table. Hear a simple recipe for using delicious tomatoes. Selengut's books include Good Fish and Shroom: Mind-Bendingly Good Recipes for Cultivated and Wild Mushrooms.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Patrice Demombynes, a long-time friend of artist Rolon Bert Garner and the owner of the Virginia Inn. Garner died on  Aug. 17. He had a big impact on the Seattle art scene during his life. 

Ross Reynolds interviews Larry Gossett and Bob Santos, two members of Seattle’s "Gang of Four." In the social turmoil of the 1960s and '70s, four Seattle political activists came of age: Roberto Maestas from the Latino community, Native American activist Bernie Whitebear, Bob Santos of the Asian community, and African American leader Larry Gossett.

Santos is the co-author of “Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Alex Hymer, co-owner of Sweet River Bakery in Pateros, Washington. The bakery is about an hour south of Winthrop and Twisp, and has been serving up caffeine and internet access to wildfire evacuees from the two towns.

Flames and smoke rise on a hillside above Twisp River Road near Twisp, Wash., Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

“Everything is tapped out.”

Those were the not-so-reassuring words of Peter Goldmark, Washington state lands commissioner. He spoke Thursday with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, the day after three firefighters were killed in a wildfire near Twisp.

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times reporter Will Drabold about his investigation into the Department of Social and Health Services which revealed issues in staffing and funding that put Washington kids at risk. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about wildfire season in British Columbia. 

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

Many people thought it was Vern Fonk they were seeing in the outrageous commercial for Vern Fonk insurance. But actually it was a man named Rob Thielke.

Thielke rose from officer manager to becoming  president of the company and the creator and actor in those zany commercials. 

Thielke died Sunday from cancer after a long illness at the age 50. But he’ll  live on in those memorably creative commercials.

Prison bars file photo.
Flickr Photo/Neil Conway (CC BY2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6NUT6x

A few years ago Theresa Nolte fell in love with Kelly Beard, an inmate at the Monroe Correctional Complex. Nolte was a prison staffer.

Consensual or not, sexual contact between prison staffers and inmates is illegal.

Why Does Amazon Think It's A Startup?

Aug 18, 2015

Ross Reynolds talks with Chris Devore, managing director of Techstars, about how Amazon can act like a startup even though it's really not one.

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

It’s a bruising, even brutal, workplace where an employee caring for a dying parent is seen as “a problem” and people cry at their desks. Or it’s an exhilarating place where even lower-level workers can change the way business gets done in America.

Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop and the Seattle Times’ Jon Talton told KUOW's Ross Reynolds that a New York Times story over the weekend and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ passionate response to it provide an intriguing, complex look inside a company that has remade retail and the city it calls home.

Shilo Murphy at the People's Harm Reduction Alliance in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The day Shilo Murphy found his friend dead from an overdose, he resolved to change his life.

He wouldn’t quit drugs. He liked how heroin made him feel. But he wanted to improve the lives of drug users.

"My experience of having a close friend die was that I wasn't going to take it anymore,” Murphy told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. “It being the conditions we lived under, the discrimination we felt, the constant violence towards us.”

King County primary ballot.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds speaks with C.R. Douglas, political analyst for Q13 Fox, about the initial results from the August primary elections.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Feliks Banel, a freelance reporter for KUOW, about a site in Ballard shortlisted to house a tent city. Ballard locals hosted a gathering on Monday to protest the use of this specific site for a homeless encampment. 

King County primary ballot.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks with Todd Donovan, professor at Western Washington University, about why more people won't be voting in Tuesday's primary election.

Scotts Bluff National Monument along the Oregon Trail.
Flickr Photo/Kent Kanouse (CC BY NC 2.0)

Ross Reynolds interviews Rinker Buck about his new book,“The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey.” Buck and his brother took a mule-drawn wagon more than 2,000 miles over the path of the trail that brought the first mass migration of white settlers to the Pacific Northwest.

Maya Lin with Nez Perce elder Horace Axtell at our dedication ceremony for Chief Timothy Park near Clarkston, Washington.
Miranda Ross

Ross Reynolds interviews artist Maya Lin, designer of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, about the Confluence Project.

Since 2001 Lin has been working on six interpretive art works that track the Lewis and Clark expedition route along the Columbia River. She weaves together several things to create the projects: the Lewis and Clark Journals about their pioneering trip across country, the history of the Columbia River’s geology, native American accounts and  a contemporary environmental perspective.

A sign for the farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds meets food writer Sara Dickerman and her daughter Adele at the Columbia City Farmers Market to find out what’s fresh: some fine juicy plums that Dickerman turns into a plum pizza.

Claudia Castro Luna
Courtesy Claudia Castro Luna

Seattle’s first-ever civic poet sees fertile ground for verse in this city’s “time of transition” amid rapid growth.

Claudia Castro Luna, appointed Monday by Mayor Ed Murray, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that something specific about the role called to her.  

Ross Reynolds interviews former Stranger writer Paul Constant about why he created Seattle Review of Books. Constant says he intends to reflect the typical Seattle reader. And he's paying reviewers.

Electric trolley advertises zero emissions.
Flickr Photo/Gordon Werner (CC BY SA 2.0)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics reporter for the Seattle Times, about the impact of Governor Jay Inslee's plan to impose a cap on carbon emissions in Washington. 

City of Seattle Office of the Waterfront

A proposal to upend the official city waterfront plan and preserve a chunk of the Alaskan Way Viaduct as an elevated park isn’t sitting well with former Seattle Mayor Charlie Royer.

“These are being treated like competing proposals in the media, and they are in no way competing proposals,” Royer told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds of the Park My Viaduct initiative.

Single-family homes such as this one in Greenwood could be rezoned to become a multi-family dwelling should draft proposals by Seattle's affordable housing task force come to fruition.
Courtesy of Hana Sevcikova

Mayor Ed Murray’s decision to step back from proposal to increase density in Seattle’s single-family neighborhoods is a disappointment, says a woman who played a big role in developing the plan.

Faith Pettis, co-chair of Murray's Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda committee, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that some people misunderstood that part of a much larger plan.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who is running for president in 2016.
Flickr Photo/Brookings Institution (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont, hasn’t minced words calling for a political revolution, which could appeal to Washington’s liberal pockets.

“Liberal progressive candidates generally do well here, and I would say that would bode well for Bernie Sanders' prospects,” University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.

The Goddess Kring, aka Shannon Nicole Kringen, was a regular on Seattle public access TV.
Courtesy of ChannelingYourself.com

Think back to a time before the Internet, before Netflix … a time when cable TV had a mere 57 channels. It was the 1980s and ’90s, the heyday of public access television, a wild and wooly experiment we haven’t seen the likes of before or since.

Ross Reynolds talks with Carol Wagner, senior vice president for patient safety at the Washington State Hospital Association, about some of the infections patients contract at hospitals. 

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