Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer left the Port of Seattle for Alaska on the morning of June 15, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Brian Gregory

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about how Shell Oil's decision to stop off-shore arctic oil drilling might affect Western Washington. Also, they talk about how Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to the Seattle area could affect the economy long-term.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Ross Reynolds interviews Hal Snow, the head of cannabis practice at the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer. It’s legal to buy and sell marijuana in some states, but the legal picture is far from clear. Cannabis is still illegal under federal law, although tolerated by the attorney general as long as states follow certain rules. But that makes most bankers leery about providing financial services to marijuana businesses. Will a new president and Congress in January 2017 change the picture? 

Jazmyn Scott stands in front of a mural created for MOHAI by SPECSWIZARD who has been making art and beats in Seattle since 1978.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

This week MOHAI opened a new show called The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. The exhibit is not just about the history here, it’s also about how Seattle hip-hop fits into the larger culture.

For Daudi Abe, author of the upcoming book “Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle 1979-2015,” it all began 36 years ago.

In this screenshot from a video provided by the Seattle Police Department, William Wingate is seen using a golf club like a cane when confronted by Officer Cynthia Whitlatch on July 9, 2014, in Seattle.
YouTube

Ross Reynolds interviews Crosscut reporter David Kroman about Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole's decision to fire Officer Cynthia Whitlatch for her questionable arrest of a 69-year-old black man who was using a golf club as a cane last July.

Some are saying this is a sign that Seattle Police may have turned the corner in the effort to reform under a Department of Justice Consent decree  aimed at stopping excessive  use of force by the department. But there's still a question of whether the police union will overturn the firing.

Jane McGonigal
Wikipedia/Public Domain

Ross Reynolds interviews Jane McGonigal, director of game research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, about her new book "Superbetter."

While recovering from a debilitating concussion, McGonigal applied what she knew about game science and cognitive psychology to speed her recovery. She points to research that finds games can help control pain more effectively than opiates and help reduce post-traumatic stress disorder.

Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Raffa (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iMN9iL

Ross Reynolds talks to Emily Parkhurst, an editor for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the University of Washington's new deal with Tsinghua University in Beijing to study clean energy technology.

Cyrus Habib.
Official photo

Ross Reynolds talks to State Sen. Cyrus Habib (D-Kirkland) about his life and political career. Habib is three-time cancer survivor and has been blind since age 8. He was the first and only Iranian-American elected official to hold a state office in the U.S.

Ross Reynolds talks with Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz about why President Xi Jinping is putting meetings with tech and business leaders in Seattle ahead of a trip to the White House.

Ross Reynolds interviews Dr. Sharon  Sutton who is acting as a mentor  for architecture students at the University of Washington as they put together a workshop to design the Ballard homeless camp on Market Street.

Students will meet with people who will live in the camp, neighbors, and other interest parties to figure out how it should look. Sutton says if the Market Street site is going to work for 52 homes, they will have to be more than one story tall, so tents are out. 

A classroom at the University of Washington, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Emmett Anderson (CC BY NC)/http://bit.ly/1KFtI27

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington biology lecturer Scott Freeman about how the traditional college instructional style -- think large halls with lots of students -- isn't the best method for teaching students.

He and others tried something different by including more interaction.  All the students did better with the changes, but women, minorities and low-income people particularly improved in the interactive environment. It's also been verified in subsequent research.

Ross Reynolds talks to Porter Erisman, a former vice president at Alibaba -- the biggest e-commerce site on the Web -- about his new book, "Alibaba's World: How A Remarkable Chinese Company is Changing the Face of Global Business."

Mary Gates Hall, University of Washington
Flickr Photo/Nam-ho Park (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iWcYg0

Ross Reynolds speaks with Amy Hagopian, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington, about why she's joined an effort to unionize faculty at the University of Washington.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Brandy Sincyr, a program assistant with Columbia Legal Services and the author of a report counting homeless students in Washington, about why the group thinks schools have been undercounting their homeless students.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lincoln High School principal Patrick Erwin about the upcoming visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Law gavel
Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/ http://bit.ly/1QiDCKB

Ross Reynolds talks with state Representatives Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg) and Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) about a proposed initiative that would make state Supreme Court justices recuse themselves from cases involving donors who've given them more than $1,000.

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