Ross Reynolds | KUOW News and Information

Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross creates community conversations (like the Ask A events) that supplement and complement KUOW's on-air and on-line services. He produces the occasional arts and news feature. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013 and KUOW's Seattle Afternoon from 1988 to 1992.

Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. He led  KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted  the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has been an East-West Center media fellow in the Kingdom of Tonga, an  East-West Center Jefferson Fellow in Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia and a RIAS Berlin Visiting American Journalist in Berlin, Brussels, Prague, Dresden. In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and as a reporter at the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

King County primary ballot.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks with Todd Donovan, professor at Western Washington University, about why more people won't be voting in Tuesday's primary election.

Scotts Bluff National Monument along the Oregon Trail.
Flickr Photo/Kent Kanouse (CC BY NC 2.0)

Ross Reynolds interviews Rinker Buck about his new book,“The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey.” Buck and his brother took a mule-drawn wagon more than 2,000 miles over the path of the trail that brought the first mass migration of white settlers to the Pacific Northwest.

Maya Lin with Nez Perce elder Horace Axtell at our dedication ceremony for Chief Timothy Park near Clarkston, Washington.
Miranda Ross

Ross Reynolds interviews artist Maya Lin, designer of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, about the Confluence Project.

Since 2001 Lin has been working on six interpretive art works that track the Lewis and Clark expedition route along the Columbia River. She weaves together several things to create the projects: the Lewis and Clark Journals about their pioneering trip across country, the history of the Columbia River’s geology, native American accounts and  a contemporary environmental perspective.

A sign for the farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds meets food writer Sara Dickerman and her daughter Adele at the Columbia City Farmers Market to find out what’s fresh: some fine juicy plums that Dickerman turns into a plum pizza.

Claudia Castro Luna
Courtesy Claudia Castro Luna

Seattle’s first-ever civic poet sees fertile ground for verse in this city’s “time of transition” amid rapid growth.

Claudia Castro Luna, appointed Monday by Mayor Ed Murray, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that something specific about the role called to her.  

Ross Reynolds interviews former Stranger writer Paul Constant about why he created Seattle Review of Books. Constant says he intends to reflect the typical Seattle reader. And he's paying reviewers.

Electric trolley advertises zero emissions.
Flickr Photo/Gordon Werner (CC BY SA 2.0)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics reporter for the Seattle Times, about the impact of Governor Jay Inslee's plan to impose a cap on carbon emissions in Washington. 

City of Seattle Office of the Waterfront

A proposal to upend the official city waterfront plan and preserve a chunk of the Alaskan Way Viaduct as an elevated park isn’t sitting well with former Seattle Mayor Charlie Royer.

“These are being treated like competing proposals in the media, and they are in no way competing proposals,” Royer told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds of the Park My Viaduct initiative.

Single-family homes such as this one in Greenwood could be rezoned to become a multi-family dwelling should draft proposals by Seattle's affordable housing task force come to fruition.
Courtesy of Hana Sevcikova

Mayor Ed Murray’s decision to step back from proposal to increase density in Seattle’s single-family neighborhoods is a disappointment, says a woman who played a big role in developing the plan.

Faith Pettis, co-chair of Murray's Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda committee, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that some people misunderstood that part of a much larger plan.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who is running for president in 2016.
Flickr Photo/Brookings Institution (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont, hasn’t minced words calling for a political revolution, which could appeal to Washington’s liberal pockets.

“Liberal progressive candidates generally do well here, and I would say that would bode well for Bernie Sanders' prospects,” University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.

The Goddess Kring, aka Shannon Nicole Kringen, was a regular on Seattle public access TV.
Courtesy of

Think back to a time before the Internet, before Netflix … a time when cable TV had a mere 57 channels. It was the 1980s and ’90s, the heyday of public access television, a wild and wooly experiment we haven’t seen the likes of before or since.

Ross Reynolds talks with Carol Wagner, senior vice president for patient safety at the Washington State Hospital Association, about some of the infections patients contract at hospitals. 

Flickr Photo/A.Davey (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

The perfect egg has dark orange yolk and a thick white. And when you crack it open, it acts as its own sauce.

Not, in other words, your typical grocery store egg, with a pale yolk that tastes like nothing.

We're not that emerald of a city anymore with the recent drought conditions.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Youngstrom (CC BY NC 2.0)

Extremely dry weather and rising use have got the Puget Sound region’s cities thinking seriously about a water shortage later this year.

Seattle, Tacoma and Everett said Monday that they're activating the first stage of water shortage response plans.

Hannah Webb, a resident of Seattle's Tent City 3 in Feb. 2015 on the campus of Seattle Pacific University
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to Matt Driscoll, columnist for The News Tribune, about why there are no tent cities in Tacoma to serve their homeless population. 

A view from inside a Boeing factory
Courtesy of Boeing

Ross Reynolds interviews journalist Russ Banham about the history of the Boeing company, which turns 100 this year. Banhan is the author of “Higher: 100 Years of Boeing.”

It begins with the story of how Bill Boeing went from the timber business to boat building to airplanes. Banham also tells the story of how at the end of World War II a Boeing executive found plans for a swept wing jet aircraft while touring a liberated German factory. This led to the Boeing 707, the plane that secured Boeing's pre-eminence in the U.S. airline industry.

Green beans at the Ballard farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes to the Ballard Farmers Market with author, blogger and restaurateur Molly Wizenberg to find what's fresh  this week --green beans! -- and learn a simple recipe.

This small house with a family with five kids was saved by defensible space at the Chelan Butte Fire in 2011. The property had green grass all the way around. The owner is a former Forest Service employee who knows what it means to live in fire country.
Flickr Photo/Washington DNR (CC BY NC ND)

Ross Reynolds interviews Roger Faris about how to protect your home from wildfire, whether you live near a forest, in the suburbs or in the city. Faris has worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency in disaster areas from Alaska to Florida, including Eastern Washington during last year’s severe wildfire season,  to figure out what can be done to reduce damage from disaster.

A seismogram of an earthquake off California.
U.S. Geological Survey

Ross Reynolds talks with Pacific Northwest Seismic Network director John Vidale about the challenges of creating an early warning system for earthquakes.

Compost trash
Flickr Photo/Jason Tester Guerilla Futures (CC BY ND 2.0)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Brian Hodges, an attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation. Hodges is suing the city of Seattle on behalf of eight Seattle residents who say inspection of their garbage to enforce food waste laws is an invasion of their privacy.

Ross Reynolds talks with Northwest News Network reporter Jessica Robinson about same sex marriage in Idaho.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lynne Miller from the King County Office of Emergency Management about the essentials we tend to forget when putting together our emergency kits.

Ross Reynolds interviews Roger Faris on simple things you can do prepare your home for an earthquake. Faris helped launch the Seattle Project Impact Earthquake Home Retrofit Program and he’s worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency in disaster areas from Alaska to Florida to figure out what can be done to reduce damage from disaster.

Housing: Condos along Seattle's downtown waterfront.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Lackey (CC BY 2.0)

Adding or preserving 20,000 affordable housing units in Seattle sounds great for renters on paper.

But Sharon Lee, executive director of the Low Income Housing Institute, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds there are some holes in Mayor Ed Murray's plan for housing over the next 10 years.

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Most of us in Seattle aren't ready for The Big One.

Eric Holdeman, former director of the King County Office of Emergency Management, said we shouldn’t expect outsiders to swoop in and save us when a long-anticipated massive earthquake hits (and it will hit, we just don’t know when).

Stackhouse Apartments, South Lake Union
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds speaks with Richard Hagar, a local real estate investor and pundit, to get one view of what Mayor Ed Murray's new affordable housing proposals would mean for Seattle renters. 

Shoppers peruse produce at the University District farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds interviews Chef Edouardo Jordan of Salere about picking tomatoes at the University District Farmers Market and making a warm tomato salad.

Jordan says  he likes them "just ready to explode in your hand." Farmers come to his restaurant to sell him produce, but Jordan explains why it's important to come to the market to meet them instead.

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the end of the session and what lawmakers left on the table for next time.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds talks with Faith Li Pettis, co-chair of Seattle's Housing Affordability and Livability Committee, about new recommendations for solving the city's affordable housing crisis.

Dear Seattle: It's Time To Desegregate

Jul 9, 2015

Ross Reynolds talks with Ron Sims, former King County executive and former deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, about new rules aimed to address persistent housing segregation in cities. Explore an interactive map of race based on the 2010 census.