Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

Brain surgery is now done by lasers. But doctors must still open up the skull in an incredibly difficult procedure. Scientists are developing a transparent skull to make it easier. The transparent skull will serve as a window into the brain allowing immediate access to check the progress of cancer without repeated surgeries.  It could take a decade before the see-through skull is perfected. Ross Reynolds talks with Masa Rao, assistant professor in mechanical engineering at the University of California Riverside who is working on the skull.

Originally, when two people wanted to engage in sexual relations, they had to first meet and then have a requisite date or two before finally getting down to business. A new wave of mobile apps wants to do away with all that hoopla. The apps aim to bring two — or more than two if that’s your fancy — people together just by hitting a button. No strings attached, no wooing necessary. Ross Reynolds talks with Kevin Roose about this market and what it means for safe sex.

Are Washingtonians forced by state government to act against their religious beliefs?

Last year, a Richland florist refused to provide flowers for a gay customer’s wedding. As a result, that florist is currently being sued by the state of Washington. When some Washington pharmacists felt they shouldn’t have to provide the morning-after pill to customers, the state pharmacy board jumped in. 

Now, Spokane Valley state Senator Mike Padden is drawing up a bill that would limit the state from compelling citizens to act against their religious beliefs. The senator talked with Ross Reynolds.

In 1993 Seattle was famous for Nirvana, the internet and Tom Hanks' insomnia. But two woman decided that the city was missing something, something they believed there was a need and market for — the city's first women-friendly sex shop. Co-owners Claire Cavanah and Rachel Venning launched Babeland (originally Toys in Babeland) 20 years ago this month and Cavanah spoke with Ross Reynolds about the many ways the industry of selling 'sexcessories' has changed. 

Sentencing begins soon for Carri and Larry Williams. They were convicted of several charges this week in the death of their 13-year-old adopted daughter Hana Williams.

In May 2011, the Ethiopian teenager died in her own backyard from hypothermia. Her autopsy also found that malnutrition was a contributing factor.

This week, her adopted parents were both convicted of first-degree manslaughter. Carri Williams was convicted of the most serious charge: homicide by abuse. Larry Williams was not. On that charge, the judge declared a mistrial.

Many questions involving a possible retrial, appeals, and sentencing remain unanswered. Rich Weyrich is the prosecuting attorney for Skagit County. He talked with Ross Reynolds. Cassie Trueblood served as defense attorney for Larry Williams. She talked with Marcie Sillman.

Two new iPhones are hitting the market later in September. The upscale iPhone 5S, and the cheaper iPhone 5C . But will the iPhone 5c be cheap enough?

There used to be a time when a new iPhone meant a jump in Apple’s stock. This time, not so much. Apple's stock fell 5 percent due to concerns that the new  iPhone 5C is not cheap enough to compete with Google's Android phones, which currently lead the pack. Joining us to talk tech is Todd Bishop co-founder of the independent technology news site and online community Geekwire.

Author Nicole Hardy was a virgin until she was 36 years old. Hardy wanted to be a good Mormon, but eventually left the church. That journey is chronicled in her new book, "Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin: A Memoir". Ross Reynolds talks with Hardy about growing up in the church and leaving it behind.

Flickr Photo/Debra Sweet

After an off-the-cuff suggestion by Secretary of State John Kerry, President Bashar al-Assad’s government has accepted a Russian plan to turn over their chemical weapons. The significance of this agreement is “huge” according to Joseph Cirincione, the president of Ploughshares Fund and member of Secretary Kerry’s International Security Advisory Board. He explains what the prospects of this plan working are and how the international community might go about seizing Syria’s chemical weapons.

Seattle Times tech columnist Monica Guzman is back on the grid and using her phone to help navigate the city. Guzman tells us about a smart phone app that helps her get where she needs to go with the least amount of trouble. The app is called Waze.  It incorporates user data and the more you drive, the better it gets. Ross Reynolds chats with Guzman about how she gets around town.

Author Alex Soojung-Kim Pang has spent years studying people, technology and how devices have invaded our lives. In his book, "The Distraction Addiction," he explains how overusing technology is "destroying our souls." Ross Reynolds talks with Pang about how people can be more mindful with their technology.

Washington state’s Health Benefit Exchange officially opens for enrollment October 1. Last month, state Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler approved plans from only four insurance companies. But last week, following negotiations with several insurance companies, Kreidler doubled that number. In total, 46 individual insurance plans from eight different companies will be available on the marketplace.

What will more choices mean for consumers seeking health coverage? Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler talked with Ross Reynolds.

The Pierce County jail is facing a hefty 8 percent budget shortfall. So far, 30 jobs are slated to be lost and two jail units, which can house more than 160 inmates, are set to close. Officials say even with these reductions, the budget crises will not be fixed.

Ross Reynolds talks with Pierce County Sheriff Paul Pastor about how these cuts will affect the jail and public safety.

Congress is back in session this week, and Syria is at the top of the agenda. That means other business like immigration reform and the debt ceiling moves to the back burner. Why can’t Congress do two things at once? Marcie Sillman and Ross Reynolds talk with Andrea Seabrook of DecodeDC.

Studies upon studies have exposed the dangers of texting and driving. Some go so far as to say texting is worse than drinking and driving. Renowned director Werner Herzog even made a film about it.

Yet a new University of Washington study shows that one in 12 drivers in Washington state are still using cellphones or other electronic devices on the road, and half of those using their devices are texting.

Ross Reynolds talks with Beth Ebel, the study's principal investigator and trauma doctor in the Injury Prevention and Research Center at Harborview, about her findings.

Congress returned to Washington, D.C., today with Syria at the forefront of its agenda. Lawmakers will debate a resolution on military intervention against Syria for allegedly using chemical weapons.

To take a step back, Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Raymond Zilinskas, director of the Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies about chemical weapons — what they are and why they are considered a different class than conventional weapons. 

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