Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

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Flickr Photo/Dank Depot

Starting next year, recreational pot stores will be open for business all over the state of Washington. State officials said the city of Kent could have three. But now, it looks like they won’t have any. Last year, the Kent City Council banned medical marijuana collective gardens over concerns that they violated federal law. Now, the city’s applying that same ban to recreational pot stores. Why?

Pat Fitzpatrick is Kent’s acting city attorney. He talked with Ross Reynolds.

Flickr Photo/World Bank Photo Collection

The biotech industry took a big hit during the recession, and it can still be difficult in this area to find and keep work in that field. But for those looking to enter the industry there are a few things you should keep in mind. Luke Timmerman, the national biotech editor at Xconomy, an online business and technology blog, explains what you should consider before taking a job in biotech and the challenges of the industry.

Nirvana's album "In Utero."

It’s the 20th anniversary of Nirvana’s final record, "In Utero," released  in September 1993. Kurt Cobain wanted the album to sound less like a pop record so the band brought in producer Steve Albini.

But the record company thought the results were too harsh. Another producer did the final mix. To mark the anniversary, there’s new deluxe edition of the album out that includes the rougher original mixes. Ross Reynolds and music writer Charles Cross discuss the impact and influence of "In Untero."

Flickr Photo/CJ_Supreme

The Korean War ended 60 years ago. It caused many hardships, including the separation of  family members between the North and the South. To this day, there is no official contact between citizens of the two countries. No phone calls. No letters.

But finally in 2000, North and South Korea agreed to hold family reunions. The last one took place in 2010. Another reunion was scheduled to take place today at a North Korean resort, but it was abruptly postponed over the weekend by the North Korean government.

Why did this happen? And what does it mean for diplomacy between the two countries? Charles Armstrong is professor of Korean studies at Columbia University. He talked with Ross Reynolds.

AP Photo/Jonathan Kalan

The deadly terrorist attack in a Kenyan shopping mall has so far left over 60 dead and many wounded. The Somali-based terrorist organization Al-Shabab claimed responsibility. While the attack came as a shock to many of us, law professor Makau Mutua says Kenya has known for a long time that an attack was coming.

Makau Mutua is the dean of University of Buffalo's Law School and member of the independent, nonpartisan Council on Foreign Relations. Ross Reynolds talks with Makau about the context behind this act of terrorism.

Flickr Photo/401 (K) 2013

Referred to as one of the most awkward conversations outside of a first date, asking for a raise is no walk in the park. There's an art to it. And in this economic climate where rent is skyrocketing and wages are stagnating, knowing how to ask for more money is a good skill to have. President of Career-Horizons, Matt Youngquist, teaches Ross Reynolds the art of salary negotiation.

Courtesy of Washington State Treasurer's Office

Bank of America will handle proceeds connected to marijuana sales despite federal restrictions. Under federal policy, the government views money from marijuana sales as money laundering.

Flickr Photo/Ian Fisher

The problem of public toilets in Pioneer Square has been ongoing and unsolved.

A Pioneer Square merchant built a guerilla porta-potty because the aroma from the alley next door getting to be too much. The city spent millions on self-cleaning toilets but ended up pulling them out because of issues with drugs and prostitution. The city ended up selling the toilets on eBay in 2008.

Is there finally a solution in sight? Until a few days ago, the Seattle City Council had a tentative deal with a local developer to bring a public toilet to Pioneer Square. In exchange for adding 30 feet of height to its Pioneer Square building, developer Urban Visions was going to purchase a $250,000 “Portland Loo” for the city.

Flickr Photo/Nick Amoscato (CC BY-NC-ND)

Last November, Washington became the 42nd state to allow charter schools. Yesterday, the Washington Charter School Commission opened the statewide application process. The voter approved initiative allows for 40 charter schools to open over the next five years. Ross Reynolds talks with Steve Sundquist, Commission chair, about what they're looking for in the charter school applications.

More people now die of suicide than in car accidents. In 2010, 38,364 suicide deaths were reported in the United States. Many say suicide is still underreported. September is suicide prevention awareness month and today The Record is taking a look at Seattle's Crisis Clinic, where volunteers staff a 24-hour crisis line. They take calls from people thinking about suicide and others who need help. Ross Reynolds talks with Crisis Clinic's director of crisis services, Michael Reading.

Jonathan Lethem's book "Dissident Gardens."

Jonathan Lethem is one of America’s finest novelists. His critically acclaimed books include "Motherless Brooklyn," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, "Fortress of Solitude" and “Chronic City."

Lethem’s nonfiction work includes a long interview with Bob Dylan and a marvelous profile of James Brown, both for Rolling Stone magazine. Lethem’s latest novel "Dissident Gardens" is about American Communists and leftists. 

The human impulse to throw yourself into history with an attitude that it could matter, that you can change things and that you'll sacrifice for this, is very universal. It's an impulse that becomes misused or betrayed or conflicted in so many different ways, and this book becomes a catalog of all those different kinds of disappointment. — Lethem

Ross Reynolds talks to Lethem about his latest novel, writing, politics and music.

KUOW Photo/Jake Warga

This week, KUOW has been taking a deeper look at the jobs recovery in Washington state in our series, The Big Reset. In this segment, we're talking numbers: unemployment, wages, industry trends. And the good news is, Washington is doing all right.

The unemployment rate here has mirrored the national average at around 7 percent. Ross Reynolds talks with regional labor economist, Anneliese Vance-Sherman about Washington's recovery and industry trends.

Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Those who have been following the US and Seattle soccer scene for a while are familiar with Olympia-born Kasey Keller. He has been to the World Cup four times as a goalkeeper for the United States Men's National Team and played extensively in international leagues.

Back in 2008, Keller returned to where he started to play for the Seattle Sounders. He is now one of the voices of the Sounders, announcing games with Ross Fletcher. Keller joins us to talk soccer and the Sounders' performance this year.

Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Last November, Washington became the 42nd state to legalize charter schools. The voter-approved initiative allows for no more than 40 public charter schools to open over a five-year period. The first schools could open as early as next fall.

Next week, the state Charter School Commission will begin sifting through applications from would-be charter school operators. Who are these potential operators? And how might charter schools be different from traditional public schools?

Brenda McDonald is planning principal for the Spokane School District. She’s applying to open Pride Prep in Spokane, which would serve grades 6 through 12.

Kristina Bellamy-McClain is the former principal of Emerson Elementary in Seattle. She’s applying to open a K-8 school in South King County or Tacoma.

They talked with Ross Reynolds.

Republicans and Democrats have been debating a bill that would cut $40 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program over the next 10 years. House Republicans argue that the food stamp program has grown too large and unmanageable.  Representative Suzan DelBene, D-Wash., has been an active advocate against the Republican-backed bill. She explains the implication of this bill.

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