Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

City of Seattle pothole rangers at work in 2011.
Seattle Department of Transportation

The cure for some of Seattle’s transportation pains may be tough to swallow: a nearly $800 increase in annual taxes, fees and user charges for the city’s typical household.

That number comes from former state transportation chief Doug MacDonald, who calculated the cost of changes in state tax structure, car-tab charges and proposed levies.

Heather Anderson, trail name Anish, posted this picture of herself after beating the Appalachian Trail unsupported record.
Facebook Photo/Anish Hikes

A Seattle-area woman has set a new speed record for an unsupported hike along the Appalachian Trail: 54 days, 7 hours, 48 minutes.

To put Heather Anderson’s feat in perspective:

A massive multi-family apartment building with commercial retail spaces underneath. A train enters the photo in the foreground at the left of the frame.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his new initiative to develop 700 units of affordable housing around transit centers. 

John Boehner, pictured here in 2012, announced his resignation from Congress on Sept. 25, 2015.
Flickr Photo/Speaker John Boehner (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds talks with reporter Jeff Mapes of The Oregonian  about how John Boehner's resignation as Speaker of the House could affect Republican lawmakers in the Northwest.

Nate Gibbs-Bowling of Lincoln High School in Tacoma, Washington won 2016 Washington Teacher of the Year.

Ross Reynolds interviews Washington's Teacher of the Year Nate Gibbs-Bowling of Lincoln High School in Tacoma. Last week was quite a week for Gibbs-Bowling: Monday he learned he won teacher of the year and on Wednesday he welcomed Chinese President Xi Jinping to his classroom.

Why It Costs So Much To Drill In The Arctic

Sep 28, 2015
The drilling rig Kulluk was grounded in 2013 after efforts by U.S. Coast Guard and tug vessel crews to move the vessel to a safe harbor during a winter storm during a tow from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, to Everett, Wash.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Dept. of Defense (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds talks to New York Times reporter Steven Myers about why we haven't seen the arctic oil boom everyone predicted.

NASA astronaut Michael Barratt with floating tomato in Zvezda service module of the International Space Station.
Wikipedia Photo/Public Domain

Ross Reynolds interviews Michael Barratt, a Camas, Washington born astronaut who flew on the last Space Shuttle mission, about how real space travel compares to the movie versions. He's already seen the new Matt Damon film "Martian" twice. Barratt also talks about how his upbringing on a farm was good preparation for going into space.

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer left the Port of Seattle for Alaska on the morning of June 15, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Brian Gregory

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about how Shell Oil's decision to stop off-shore arctic oil drilling might affect Western Washington. Also, they talk about how Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to the Seattle area could affect the economy long-term.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Ross Reynolds interviews Hal Snow, the head of cannabis practice at the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer. It’s legal to buy and sell marijuana in some states, but the legal picture is far from clear. Cannabis is still illegal under federal law, although tolerated by the attorney general as long as states follow certain rules. But that makes most bankers leery about providing financial services to marijuana businesses. Will a new president and Congress in January 2017 change the picture? 

Jazmyn Scott stands in front of a mural created for MOHAI by SPECSWIZARD who has been making art and beats in Seattle since 1978.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

This week MOHAI opened a new show called The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. The exhibit is not just about the history here, it’s also about how Seattle hip-hop fits into the larger culture.

For Daudi Abe, author of the upcoming book “Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle 1979-2015,” it all began 36 years ago.

In this screenshot from a video provided by the Seattle Police Department, William Wingate is seen using a golf club like a cane when confronted by Officer Cynthia Whitlatch on July 9, 2014, in Seattle.

Ross Reynolds interviews Crosscut reporter David Kroman about Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole's decision to fire Officer Cynthia Whitlatch for her questionable arrest of a 69-year-old black man who was using a golf club as a cane last July.

Some are saying this is a sign that Seattle Police may have turned the corner in the effort to reform under a Department of Justice Consent decree  aimed at stopping excessive  use of force by the department. But there's still a question of whether the police union will overturn the firing.

Jane McGonigal
Wikipedia/Public Domain

Ross Reynolds interviews Jane McGonigal, director of game research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, about her new book "Superbetter."

While recovering from a debilitating concussion, McGonigal applied what she knew about game science and cognitive psychology to speed her recovery. She points to research that finds games can help control pain more effectively than opiates and help reduce post-traumatic stress disorder.

Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Raffa (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds talks to Emily Parkhurst, an editor for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the University of Washington's new deal with Tsinghua University in Beijing to study clean energy technology.

Cyrus Habib.
Official photo

Ross Reynolds talks to State Sen. Cyrus Habib (D-Kirkland) about his life and political career. Habib is three-time cancer survivor and has been blind since age 8. He was the first and only Iranian-American elected official to hold a state office in the U.S.

Ross Reynolds talks with Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz about why President Xi Jinping is putting meetings with tech and business leaders in Seattle ahead of a trip to the White House.