Ross Reynolds | KUOW News and Information

Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross creates community conversations (like the Ask A events) that supplement and complement KUOW's on-air and on-line services. He produces the occasional arts and news feature. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013 and KUOW's Seattle Afternoon from 1988 to 1992.

Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. He led  KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted  the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has been an East-West Center media fellow in the Kingdom of Tonga, an  East-West Center Jefferson Fellow in Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia and a RIAS Berlin Visiting American Journalist in Berlin, Brussels, Prague, Dresden. In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and as a reporter at the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

studio record
KUOW Photo

After the massacre at an Oregon community college, the local sheriff made a stand about the gunman. "You will not hear anyone from this law enforcement operation use his name,” said Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin.

But Mark Memmott, NPR's supervising senior editor for standards and practices, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that “the ‘who’ is an important part of the story.”

Program manager Linda Kruger prepares for the opening of the Evergreen Treatment Service clinic in Hoquiam.
KUOW Photo/Elizabeth Jenkins

Ross Reynolds talks with Molly Carney, executive director of Evergreen Treatment Services, about a pilot program that will expand access for heroin and opioid treatment.

Children's book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, points to a 3-year-old fan Marcus Gabrielli as he signed autographs in New York.
AP Photo/Mike Appleton

Did Maurice Sendak, author of "Where The Wild Things Are," talk to kids about his work?

It was 1991, and Sendak had come into the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds on “Seattle  Afternoon.”  

Bertha K. Landes served as mayor of Seattle from 1926 to 1928. She was Seattle's first and only female mayor -- also Seattle's first female police chief, according to journalist Emmett Watson.
University of Washington Digital Archives

Before Bertha was a boring machine stuck under Seattle, she was Seattle’s first female mayor.

In 1926, her campaign motto was “municipal housekeeping.”

Bertha K. Landes was her full name and “she was wonderful,” according to columnist Emmett Watson.

Julia Child was tired of hearing people complain about salt, cholesterol and fat. Try moderation and exercise, she said. This photo was taken in 1992, two years after her interview with KUOW's Ross Reynolds.
AP Photo/Jon Chase

Julia Child was mad.

“I think the word ‘healthy’ and the word ‘light’ are really kind of meaningless,” the renowned cook told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds in a prescient 1990 interview. “There are no bad or good foods; they are just healthy and unhealthy ways of using them.”

Author Walter Mosley and his father in front of their home in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles.
Waltermosley.com

People usually remember as far back as the generation that raises them, says writer Walter Mosley.

Mosley had come into KUOW’s studios to speak with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. It was 1992, and his third book, "White Butterfly," had just been published.

Easy Rawlins, Mosley’s main character, emerged from those memories. Easy was a fixer, a guy who does favors for people.

The writer Ursula K. Le Guin in 2012.
Photo © 2012 Laura Anglin

“If you have a person who is both male and female, what’s the pronoun you use?”

Ursula K. Le Guin posed that question in 1988 when she came in to the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds.

Before he created The Simpson, Matt Groening created the 'Life in Hell' comic series. Among his characters were Akbar and Jeff, whose origins go back to Groening's fifth-grade attempts at mimicking 'Peanuts.'
Matt Groening / 'Life In Hell'

Before The Simpsons, there were crazy rabbits and Akbar and Jeff.

Matt Groening, who created television’s most iconic cartoon family, spoke with Ross Reynolds in the late 1980s on the show Seattle Afternoon.

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kristin Eberhard, a senior researcher with the Sightline Institute who wrote about Oregon's new law, effective January 2016, which will automatically register eligible voters through the state Department of Motor Vehicles.

Dr. David Rawlings (left) and Dr. Andrew Scharenberg (right) pioneered a gene editing method that gives human T cells the ability to resist HIV and either kill HIV or tumors. The research could have clinical applications in as early as a few years.
Courtesy of Seattle Children's Research Institute

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. David Rawlings, director of the Center for Immunity and Immunotherapies at Seattle Children's Research Institute, about how his team pioneered a breakthrough gene-editing technique that could help patients with HIV, genetic blood diseases and certain cancers. Their study was published in the September issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Martin Friedman, an anti-racist organizer and co-facilitator of Undoing Racism workshops with The People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, about some of the ideas that informed his own anti-racist organizing.

Old or uncertified wood burning stoves will be banned in parts of Pierce County starting in October.
Flickr Photo/Michael Buist (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1LkR6HX

Ross Reynolds interviews  Craig Kenworthy, executive director of the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency, about why they're banning all old wood stoves in Tacoma and the Puyallup River valley.

Despite efforts to get people to voluntarily disable or remove their polluting older model wood stoves, there are still  an estimated 20,000 stoves still in use in that part of Pierce County. Beginning in October, those using an older wood stove, except if it's a primary source of heat, will face a $1,500 fine.

The city of Seattle is scaling back plans for its subsidized preschool program.
Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC BY-NC-SA)/http://bit.ly/1LQhs3d

Ross Reynolds speaks with Holly Miller, interim director of the Seattle Preschool Program, about how Seattle is working to avoid the "fade out" effect.

Ross Reynolds interviews novelist Stephanie Clifford about her New York Times best seller “Everybody Rise,” the story of  a 26-year-old from Maryland who tries to fit in with the wealthy New York elite. It's a contemporary take on Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth". 

Clifford  based her book on her experience of culture shock after moving from Seattle to the East Coast. When she’s not writing novels Clifford is a a New York Times reporter covering courts.

City of Seattle pothole rangers at work in 2011.
Seattle Department of Transportation

The cure for some of Seattle’s transportation pains may be tough to swallow: a nearly $800 increase in annual taxes, fees and user charges for the city’s typical household.

That number comes from former state transportation chief Doug MacDonald, who calculated the cost of changes in state tax structure, car-tab charges and proposed levies.

Heather Anderson, trail name Anish, posted this picture of herself after beating the Appalachian Trail unsupported record.
Facebook Photo/Anish Hikes

A Seattle-area woman has set a new speed record for an unsupported hike along the Appalachian Trail: 54 days, 7 hours, 48 minutes.

To put Heather Anderson’s feat in perspective:

A massive multi-family apartment building with commercial retail spaces underneath. A train enters the photo in the foreground at the left of the frame.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his new initiative to develop 700 units of affordable housing around transit centers. 

John Boehner, pictured here in 2012, announced his resignation from Congress on Sept. 25, 2015.
Flickr Photo/Speaker John Boehner (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iJlT3Z

Ross Reynolds talks with reporter Jeff Mapes of The Oregonian  about how John Boehner's resignation as Speaker of the House could affect Republican lawmakers in the Northwest.

Nate Gibbs-Bowling of Lincoln High School in Tacoma, Washington won 2016 Washington Teacher of the Year.
YouTube

Ross Reynolds interviews Washington's Teacher of the Year Nate Gibbs-Bowling of Lincoln High School in Tacoma. Last week was quite a week for Gibbs-Bowling: Monday he learned he won teacher of the year and on Wednesday he welcomed Chinese President Xi Jinping to his classroom.

Why It Costs So Much To Drill In The Arctic

Sep 28, 2015
The drilling rig Kulluk was grounded in 2013 after efforts by U.S. Coast Guard and tug vessel crews to move the vessel to a safe harbor during a winter storm during a tow from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, to Everett, Wash.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Dept. of Defense (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Fy3Kkv

Ross Reynolds talks to New York Times reporter Steven Myers about why we haven't seen the arctic oil boom everyone predicted.

NASA astronaut Michael Barratt with floating tomato in Zvezda service module of the International Space Station.
Wikipedia Photo/Public Domain

Ross Reynolds interviews Michael Barratt, a Camas, Washington born astronaut who flew on the last Space Shuttle mission, about how real space travel compares to the movie versions. He's already seen the new Matt Damon film "Martian" twice. Barratt also talks about how his upbringing on a farm was good preparation for going into space.

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer left the Port of Seattle for Alaska on the morning of June 15, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Brian Gregory

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about how Shell Oil's decision to stop off-shore arctic oil drilling might affect Western Washington. Also, they talk about how Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to the Seattle area could affect the economy long-term.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Ross Reynolds interviews Hal Snow, the head of cannabis practice at the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer. It’s legal to buy and sell marijuana in some states, but the legal picture is far from clear. Cannabis is still illegal under federal law, although tolerated by the attorney general as long as states follow certain rules. But that makes most bankers leery about providing financial services to marijuana businesses. Will a new president and Congress in January 2017 change the picture? 

Jazmyn Scott stands in front of a mural created for MOHAI by SPECSWIZARD who has been making art and beats in Seattle since 1978.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

This week MOHAI opened a new show called The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. The exhibit is not just about the history here, it’s also about how Seattle hip-hop fits into the larger culture.

For Daudi Abe, author of the upcoming book “Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle 1979-2015,” it all began 36 years ago.

In this screenshot from a video provided by the Seattle Police Department, William Wingate is seen using a golf club like a cane when confronted by Officer Cynthia Whitlatch on July 9, 2014, in Seattle.
YouTube

Ross Reynolds interviews Crosscut reporter David Kroman about Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole's decision to fire Officer Cynthia Whitlatch for her questionable arrest of a 69-year-old black man who was using a golf club as a cane last July.

Some are saying this is a sign that Seattle Police may have turned the corner in the effort to reform under a Department of Justice Consent decree  aimed at stopping excessive  use of force by the department. But there's still a question of whether the police union will overturn the firing.

Jane McGonigal
Wikipedia/Public Domain

Ross Reynolds interviews Jane McGonigal, director of game research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, about her new book "Superbetter."

While recovering from a debilitating concussion, McGonigal applied what she knew about game science and cognitive psychology to speed her recovery. She points to research that finds games can help control pain more effectively than opiates and help reduce post-traumatic stress disorder.

Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Raffa (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iMN9iL

Ross Reynolds talks to Emily Parkhurst, an editor for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the University of Washington's new deal with Tsinghua University in Beijing to study clean energy technology.

Cyrus Habib.
Official photo

Ross Reynolds talks to State Sen. Cyrus Habib (D-Kirkland) about his life and political career. Habib is three-time cancer survivor and has been blind since age 8. He was the first and only Iranian-American elected official to hold a state office in the U.S.

Ross Reynolds talks with Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz about why President Xi Jinping is putting meetings with tech and business leaders in Seattle ahead of a trip to the White House.

Ross Reynolds interviews Dr. Sharon  Sutton who is acting as a mentor  for architecture students at the University of Washington as they put together a workshop to design the Ballard homeless camp on Market Street.

Students will meet with people who will live in the camp, neighbors, and other interest parties to figure out how it should look. Sutton says if the Market Street site is going to work for 52 homes, they will have to be more than one story tall, so tents are out. 

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