Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

Summer time is berry time at the farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds and Seattle Times food writer Rebekah Denn visit the Phinney Ridge farmers market and discover a bounty of berries.

Columbia Center Tower in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/David Schott

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the upside to Chinese investment in Seattle's real estate market.

Computer scientist and author Ramez Naam
Courtesy of Ramez Naam

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle computer scientist and science fiction writer Ramez Naam about the latest technology in human enhancement.  Naam is the author of the 2010 book, “More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement."

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia corespondent Austin Jenkins about the upcoming "do or die week" for state lawmakers to finish the budget. 

University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with Crystal Eney, Director of Student Services at the University of Washington's Department of Computer Science and Engineering, about how their department achieved a rate of female enrollment that's nearly double the national average. They have been recognized for their achievements with an award from the National Center for Women and Information Technology.

King County Heroin Deaths Up 58 Percent In 2014

Jun 18, 2015
Found in Seattle's Belltown area in 2008.
Flickr photo/Elan Ruskin (CC BY-NC 2.0)

A spike in deaths from heroin use in King County has alarmed health experts and prompted warnings that the trend will continue unless efforts to treat addiction are ramped up.

The report on drug trends from the University of Washington's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute says 156 people died with heroin in their systems in 2014, a 58 percent increase over the year before.

Playground and wading pool at Woodland Park, circa 1915.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jesus Aguirre, the new superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation, about why his background in education matters and about his vision for how Seattleites of the future will play.

broadband router internet
Flickr Photo/Tom Page (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds interviews Christopher Mitchell about what steps Seattle might take to provide affordable broadband internet for all. Mitchell is the director of the Community Broadband Networks Initiative for the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

An example of animal bridge on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana. Washington is building wildlife overpasses over I-90 near Snoqualmie Pass.
Flickr Photo/Jitze Couperus

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington State Department of Transportation project manager Brian White about the new wildlife overpass that connects habitat on either side of I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass. It will be part of a project that also includes underpasses already in place near Gold Creek.

Team Elsie Piddock sails up Nichols Passage south of Ketchikan on the way to winning the Race to Alaska.
Taylor Balkom / Ketchikan Daily News

Ross Reynolds talks to Jake Beattie the director of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend and the organizer of the first ever Race to Alaska contest about how Team Elsie Piddock managed to defy expectations and win the race in one week and a day. 

Ethicist Tom McCormick works with doctors on issues like death with dignity.
University of Washington School of Medicine Department of Bioethics and Humanities.

The doctor’s oath is to "do no harm." Some doctors have a hard time dealing with requests to help someone toward death. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Tom McCormick, a senior lecturer emeritus at the Department of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington, about doctors and Washington state's death with dignity law.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Joaquin Uy, a board member of the Filipino Community Center and communications director for the Low Income Housing Alliance, about how important fast internet is to immigrant and low-income communities.

Also, Reynolds talks with Michael Mattmiller, Seattle’s chief technology officer, about the release of a feasibility study for municipal run broadband internet that city officials say makes it too expensive to compete with private companies like Comcast and Century Link. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about one doctor's push for more privatized health care in British Columbia. Also, international yoga day is coming up. Palmer tells Reynolds what's planned in Vancouver.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon.
Courtesy of Nicole Lux

Ross Reynolds interviews journalist Emma Marris about her recent essay in Orion magazine about human intervention to save endangered species in wilderness areas.

Marris explores the example of  Oregon’s Crater Lake National Park where seeds, grown from cones for two years at the Dorena Genetic Resource Center near Cottage Grove, Oregon, are being planted to preserve dying whitebark pine trees.

A bus moves into traffic on Delridge Way in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata about his alternative transportation levy proposal. The mayor's transportation levy aims to raise $930 million over nine years through property taxes. Licata says that's not the way to go. 

Pages