Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington State Department of Health educator Katie Wolt about who should get vaccinated for measles.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new deal between Ottawa and Washington that will allow customs officers to prescreen travelers who are crossing the border by bus, train or boat.

Work lights shined above the bustling site of the SR 520 Pontoon Construction Project during the first float-out on July 30, 2012.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington state Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson about recent accidents at the sites of state transportation projects.

Computer technology keyboard
Flickr Photo/Anonymous Account (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Deven McGraw, partner at the law firm Manatt, Phelps and Philips, about why medical data is so valuable to malicious hackers and what the industry needs to do about it.

The child protection unit in West Midlands, in the U.K.
Flickr Photo/West Midlands Police (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Police Department Captain Mike Edwards about a legislative proposal to increase funding for investigating and prosecuting child pornography cases. Edwards leads the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.

Ross Reynolds talks with Lara Zarowsky, policy director for Innocence Project Northwest, about a legislative proposal that would require most DNA evidence collected in violent felonies to be preserved for the entire length of someone's sentence.

Marcie Sillman talks with state Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, about his push for more transparency in government.

Also, Ross Reynolds gets the scoop on various transparency bills in the legislature from KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bruce Schneier, author of the new book, "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles To Capture Your Data and Control Your World."

Scantron test
Flickr Photo/biologycorner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Anya Kamanetz, NPR’s lead education blogger, about her new book, "The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed With Standardized Testing -- But You Don't Have To Be." She explains both sides of the controversy over standardized tests in public schools and why Seattle has become a center for the debate. 

Ross Reynolds interviews Alison Holcomb, head of an initiative from ACLU to reduce the number of people incarcerated in the U.S. by half. 

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

Ross Reynolds talks with Kristi Heim, executive director of Washington State's China Relations Council, about local exports to China and the growing demand for fresh fruit and baby products. 

City officials are scrutinizing whether the Port of Seattle's permits allow Shell Oil to dock its Arctic drilling fleet at Terminal 5.
Flickr photo/Chas Redmond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with City Councilman Mike O'Brien about plans for Shell Oil's Arctic drilling fleet to dock in Seattle.

Mayor Ed Murray joined O'Brien and other City Council members Monday in directing the Department of Planning and Development to investigate a lease that would allow Shell's fleet to dock at Terminal 5.

Ana Mari Cauce
Courtesy of University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with Ana Mari Cauce, the University of Washington's new interim president. Cauce has been at the University for 29 years and talks about what the board of regents instructed her to do in her interim role and how her training in psychology helps her.

Ross Reynolds speaks with North Bonneville Mayor Don Stevens about their city's pot store. It will become the  first government-owned pot store in the nation, possibly the world, when it opens on Saturday.

How Big Of A Risk Are Oil Trains?

Mar 6, 2015
oil train, transportation
Flickr Photo/Russ Allison

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lisa Copeland, of the Washington State Department of Ecology, about the risk oil trains could pose to the state.

Also, Reynolds speaks to Kevin Book, an analyst from ClearView Energy Partners in Washington, D.C, and with Kristen Boyles, attorney for environmental law firm Earth Justice, about the implications of oil trains in our region.

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