Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/g4ll4is (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1XFJPoy

Ross Reynolds interviews Alex Alben, Washington state’s chief privacy officer, about a new pamphlet he's issuing today called "Privacy: A Guide for Washington Citizens."  Alben talks about all the information the state has about about you and how it's used.

Flickr Photo/Blake Burkhart (Cc-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1WmamK7

Ross Reynolds speaks with David Hall, Everett's deputy city prosecutor, about the city's controversial ordinance that treats "aggressive panhandling" as a misdemeanor punishable with jail time. 

Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1irsJLd

Ross Reynolds talks with Mark Hallenbeck about traffic congestion in the Puget Sound region, and what can be done to solve it. Hallenbeck is director of the Washington State Transportation Center at the University of Washington.

Scientists believe that Kivalina, population 457, will be the first casualty of climate change in the U.S., and that it will be inundated by sea water by 2025.
Suzanne Tennant

Ross Reynolds talks to journalist Elizabeth Arnold about how rural Alaskan communities are dealing with fast rising tides and severe storms caused by climate change.

Ross Reynolds talks to Doug Merlino, author of "Beast: Blood, Struggle, and Dreams at the Heart of Mixed Martial Arts," about the legacy of mixed martial arts in the Pacific Northwest — and the superstar it created.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the many election promises made by Canada's newly elected prime minister, Justin Trudeau. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dave Meinert, owner of the Comet and several other businesses. He is a supporter of Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant's push for commercial rent stabilization. We also hear from Evan Loeffler, landlord attorney with Loeffler Law Group. 

Key Arena May Get Second Chance At The NBA

Oct 26, 2015
Key Arena in Seattle Center.
Flickr Photo/Doug Kerr (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1WeuApa

Ross Reynolds sits down with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker to discuss why several maritime groups, including the port and longshoremen union, want the city to reconsider Key Arena as a site for potential NBA or NHL teams.

Ross Reynolds speaks with New York Times reporter Nick Wingfield about after school video game leagues for kids. Wingfield recently took his daughter to a sneak peek at one league in Seattle. 

Bruce Pavitt and Adam Farish show off the 8Stem app, which they expect to launch to the public next year.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

When you play recorded music you can turn the volume up and down or adjust bass and treble – that’s about it.

Bruce Pavitt, co-founder of Sub Pop records, the record label that unleashed Nirvana on the world, thinks that’s pretty boring. So he’s teaming up with inventor Adam Farish to develop a new music format called 8Stem.

Pavitt and Farish told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that it will upend recorded music by letting listeners engage more deeply with what they hear.

Ross Reynolds interviews former King County prosecutor Christopher Bayley about his new book, “Seattle Justice: The Rise and Fall of the Police Payoff System in Seattle." 

Deborah Zech Artis, left, and Sally Bagshaw drove off in a car2go together. Bagshaw was driving Zech Artis to her car up the street.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The candidates in District 7 are both dog people.

Sally Bagshaw, the incumbent, used to have golden retrievers. Deborah Zech Artis has a blind bichon frise named Thomas Jefferson.

A traffic camera on Mercer Street
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds weighs the costs and benefits of the Move Seattle levy with Eugene Wasserman, of Keep Seattle Affordable: No on Prop 1, and Shefali Ranganathan with Transportation Choices Coalition. City leaders are asking Seattle voters to approve the nine-year, $930 million property tax for transportation projects they say will make it safer and easier to get around.

Seattle's District 4 Candidates Are Becoming BFFs

Oct 14, 2015
Seattle City Council District 4 candidates Michael Maddux and Rob Johnson.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Outside the radio booth, Seattle City Council candidates Michael Maddux and Rob Johnson look like they could be brothers.

Easy smiles. Blue tops. Johnson rides the bus; Maddux rides his bike. They joke that that their main difference is crew necks versus V-necks.

Ross Reynolds interviews Rebecaa Ullman and Aerlyn Pfeil, two Northwest midwives who work in developing nations with victims of sexual violence. Ullman, of Anacortes, Washington, and Pfeil, of Portland, Oregon, work in conflict zones like South Sudan, Haiti, and Papua New Guinea where the levels of sexual violence have skyrocketed.

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