Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

A picture of the Kalakala ferry from 2001.
Flickr Photo/rbanks (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Knute Berger, columnist for Crosscut and Seattle Magazine, about the final demise of the famed art deco ferry, the Kalakala.

Flickr Photo/Nick Amoscato (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Don Nielsen, former member of the Seattle School Board and author of the new book, "Every School: One Citizens' Guide To Transforming Education," about his thoughts on the school system. 

Local musician Jamie Aaron, in a screenshot from one of her music videos.
YouTube

Ross Reynolds talks with local musician Jamie Aaron, who recently released her debut solo album "Velo Scene," about her inspirations.  Aaron will be playing January 23 at the Columbia City Theater. 

Santa Is Magic And Can Be Any Race You Imagine

Dec 23, 2014
An Artherton Elementary School student sings for a Make-A-Wish child for National Believe Day at on Friday, Dec. 12, 2014, in Houston.
AP Photo/Aaron M. Sprecher

Ross Reynolds talks with Debra Sullivan, president of the Seattle chapter of the Black Child Development Institute, about why having multiracial Santa Clauses is good for children.

New York Police Department officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014 in New York.
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Ross Reynolds talks with Fusion correspondent Dan Lieberman about the impact of police body cameras on police shootings and use-of-force incidents.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Mike Wagers, chief operating officer at Seattle Police Department, about how an anonymous computer programmer with an outsized data request helped prompt the Seattle Police Department's first-ever Hackathon.

Tent City 3, under I-5 in Seattle's Ravenna neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Ross Reynolds talks with Sharon Lee, executive director of the Low Income Housing Institute, about the recommendations of Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s Emergency Task Force on Unsheltered Homelessness.

Protesters in response to the Ferguson and Eric Garner grand jury decisions converge on downtown Seattle on Dec. 4, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Rory McVeigh, director of the Center for the Study of Social Movements at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, about how the Ferguson-inspired protests can evolve into a movement for lasting change.

Frank Chopp, Washington Speaker of the House, in 2006.
Flickr Photo/The Children's Alliance (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State Speaker of the House Frank Chopp’s path to politics began in Bremerton, Washington, in a surplus housing unit from the Navy Yard. He started as an activist and hasn’t abandoned that point of view.

“I consider myself still to be a community organizer, I just happen to be speaker of the House,” he said.

Meager beginnings made him passionate about affordable housing, and helping his sister cope with bipolar disorder turned his attention to mental health care.

Ross Reynolds talks with Everett Herald reporter Noah Haglund about Snohomish County's narrow avoidance of a government shutdown at the end of the month after county executive John Lovick vetoed the council's 2015 budget last week. 

Ross Reynolds talks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the presence of Mexican drug cartels in British Columbia. They also discuss the rising price of U.S. goods north of the border and what the Canadian government is planning to do about it.

U.S. Senator Patty Murray
Flickr Photo/Senate Democrats (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with U.S. Senator Patty Murray about her top legislative priorities for 2015.

Washington drivers currently pay a gas tax every time they pump, but the state is considering a new option to fund roads projects.
Flickr Photo/futureatlas.com (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There’s hundreds of millions of dollars in backlog for repairs to Washington roads, and according to Mark Hallenbeck, director of the University of Washington’s Transportation Center, the gas tax won’t cover the cost.

The Washington State Transportation Commission is considering a different option: pay-by-mile.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/eutrophication&hypoxia (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with David Roberts, a blogger for Grist, about a clean fuel standard. 

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Ross Reynolds talks with Harold Meyerson,  journalist and editor of The American Prospect, about the future of organized labor and Seattle's $15 minimum wage movement.

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