Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Stinging Nettles
Flickr Photo/J Brew (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds interviews food writer Sara Dickerman about an early green offering in the farmers market: stinging nettles. They really do sting, but Dickerman explains how to handle them and make a delicious pesto that's distinctively different from basil pesto. You can pick them in the wild or get them at farmers market through May.

Georgette Magnin and Heather Pierce at the StoryCorps booth in New Holly.
Courtesy of StoryCorps

Georgette Magnin speaks with her decades-long friend Heather Pierce about Magnin meeting and proposing to her wife, and how life changed for her when her wife died. They recorded this talk last August at the StoryCorps booth in Seattle's New Holly neighborhood.

Audience members at the 'StoryCorps' listening party in New Holly on Feb 4., 2016.
KUOW Photo/Naomi Ishisaka

Last summer the StoryCorps booth set up in Seattle’s New Holly neighborhood. More than 250 people came by to record their conversations. 

WTO protests in Seattle, November 30, 1999.
Flickr Photo/Steve Kaiser (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds interviews novelist Sunil Yapa about his new debut novel "Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist," set during the tumultuous 1999 World Trade Organization demonstrations later known as the Battle in Seattle.

"When it happened, it was one of the really important moments in my life," Yapa said.

Web Exclusive: Listen to an extended version of the interview:

In 1987, Gerald Hankerson was wrongfully convicted of aggravated murder. After 22 years behind bars, Washington state Gov. Chris Gregoire commuted Hankerson’s life sentence. Hankerson was the first man in the history of the state to be freed after receiving a life sentence.  

Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/

Ross Reynolds asks former Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata why the back cover of his book, “Becoming A Citizen Activist,” proclaims "you can fight city hall." Licata was in City Hall for 16 years.

Computer technology keyboard
Flickr Photo/Anonymous Account (CC BY-NC-ND)/

A few years ago, University of Washington professor David Levy studied the effects of mindfulness meditation on multi-tasking. He trained his subjects, human resource managers in Seattle and San Francisco, for eight weeks in mindfulness meditation. Those who learned the techniques tested with lower stress levels and switched tasks less often.

Now Levy is applying these methods to our digital culture.

Siblings David Ko and Karen Ko
Courtesy of StoryCorps

When Roy and Alice Ko were released from internment camps after World War II, they ended up in Richland, Washington – home to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Their children David and Karen Ko talked about growing up in Richland in the years after the war.


In this StoryCorps segment Anne Roda, 70, interviews her mother, Marie Prichett, 98, about the time her family spent at Manzanar, a Japanese Internment Camp, where her husband was a social worker.

The view from Harbor West condominium in West Seattle.
Courtesy of Finn Raftery

A new study says beautiful places like King County have so many people who claim to be nones -- having no religion -- because the natural world provides a "spiritual resource." Ross Reynolds speaks with Todd Ferguson, co-author with Jeffrey Tamborello, about their finding that counties with high levels of natural amenities also have low rates of religious adherence

This segment originally aired Sept. 4, 2015.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

At the StoryCorps booth in Seattle's  New Holly neighborhood last summer, Anne Delvecchio and Larry Valdez talked about how a chance encounter with Santa Claus helped save a life.

Winemaker Charles Smith
Courtesy of Charles Smith Wines

Ross Reynolds interviews Charles Smith, one of Washington state’s winemaking stars. He managed rock bands in Denmark before moving to Walla Walla, Washington in 1999. Despite knowing little about making wine, he’s gone on to become successful, even being named Wine Enthusiast magazine's wine maker of the year last year. 

Thanksgiving dinnr food
Flickr Photo/Dan Tentler (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kima Cargill, University of Washington Tacoma clinical psychology professor and author of “Psychology of Overeating: Food and the Culture of Consumerism."

Cargill sees overeating as related to consumerism: We want to consume less, yet we’re bombarded with messages to consume more.

As an example she points out the water bottle filling stations at SeaTac airport (a nudge to consume water) which have coffee shop ads that say “You deserve better than water” (a nudge to consume high-calorie coffee products).

Rainn Wilson: 'I was on the chess team. Model United Nations. Computer club. Debate club. I played xylophone in the marching band, and the Shorecrest High School Highlanders wear kilts.  So I was a skinny, xylophone player in a dress.'
Flickr Photo/Jens Schott Knudsen (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Rainn Wilson – Dwight Schrute on The Office – grew up in the Seattle area and attended the University of Washington. He spoke recently with KUOW Ross Reynolds about nerd-dom, the Baha'i faith and his new book, "The Bassoon King: My Life in Art, Faith and Idiocy."

Port of Seattle cranes loom overhead. After a port slowdown last year, retailers and growers are trying to repair the damage of lost business.
Flickr Photo/Dennis Hamilton (CC BY 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds speaks with Fred Felleman, Seattle's most-recently elected Port commissioner, about why he thinks Seattle's citizens should pay attention to the doings at the Port of Seattle.