Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

Team Elsie Piddock sails up Nichols Passage south of Ketchikan on the way to winning the Race to Alaska.
Taylor Balkom / Ketchikan Daily News

Ross Reynolds talks to Jake Beattie the director of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend and the organizer of the first ever Race to Alaska contest about how Team Elsie Piddock managed to defy expectations and win the race in one week and a day. 

Ethicist Tom McCormick works with doctors on issues like death with dignity.
University of Washington School of Medicine Department of Bioethics and Humanities.

The doctor’s oath is to "do no harm." Some doctors have a hard time dealing with requests to help someone toward death. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Tom McCormick, a senior lecturer emeritus at the Department of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington, about doctors and Washington state's death with dignity law.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Joaquin Uy, a board member of the Filipino Community Center and communications director for the Low Income Housing Alliance, about how important fast internet is to immigrant and low-income communities.

Also, Reynolds talks with Michael Mattmiller, Seattle’s chief technology officer, about the release of a feasibility study for municipal run broadband internet that city officials say makes it too expensive to compete with private companies like Comcast and Century Link. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about one doctor's push for more privatized health care in British Columbia. Also, international yoga day is coming up. Palmer tells Reynolds what's planned in Vancouver.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon.
Courtesy of Nicole Lux

Ross Reynolds interviews journalist Emma Marris about her recent essay in Orion magazine about human intervention to save endangered species in wilderness areas.

Marris explores the example of  Oregon’s Crater Lake National Park where seeds, grown from cones for two years at the Dorena Genetic Resource Center near Cottage Grove, Oregon, are being planted to preserve dying whitebark pine trees.

A bus moves into traffic on Delridge Way in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata about his alternative transportation levy proposal. The mayor's transportation levy aims to raise $930 million over nine years through property taxes. Licata says that's not the way to go. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Tim Burgess, president of the Seattle City Council, about one piece of legislation which could help preserve existing affordable housing in the city.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins, about the battle between Republicans and Democrats over the last details of a new state budget. 

Two FBI Surveillance Flights Passed Over Seattle In May

Jun 3, 2015

Ross Reynolds speaks with Associated Press reporter Eileen Sullivan about the FBI surveillance program which sent planes over Seattle and other U.S. cities.

Also, Kim Malcolm speaks with Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union, about the wider debate about privacy versus security.

Ross Reynolds interviews James Redford, director of the documentary "Paper Tigers" that debuted at the Seattle International Film Festival.

The films tells the story of how Lincoln Alternative High School in Walla Walla, Washington, was plagued with unrest until they adopted a new trauma sensitive approach program. It’s had spectacular results with keeping kids in school and raising graduation rates.

The film includes footage shot by the high school students at the school. Redford is the co-founder with his actor father Robert Redford of the Redford Center.

The revamped entrance to The Parker Apartments on Queen Anne Hill.
Bellwether Housing

Money is a big problem for nonprofits trying to build affordable housing. It’s expensive to redevelop old buildings or build new ones.

There are tax credits and grants, and in Seattle there’s money from the city housing levy.

But one group is tapping a new source: private investors, who get a return on the money they put into affordable housing.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Charlie Bresler, the former president of the clothing chain Men’s Wearhouse who became executive director of Bainbridge Island-based charity The Life You Can Save. The nonprofit was founded by ethicist Peter Singer to encourage effective philanthropy to end poverty in developing nations. 

Flickr Photo/torbakhopper (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Shilo Murphy, executive director of the People's Harm Reduction Alliance, about their new initiative to hand out free meth pipes.

Ross Reynolds interviews Ryan Harvie, co-director of a new documentary called "Bodyslam: Revenge of the Banana."

Between 2003 and 2009 a group called Seattle Semi-Pro Wrestling was packing dive bars in Seattle with gonzo wrestling performances. Characters like Ronald McFondle, Eddie Van Glam and The Banana were cabaret fighters, spoofing wrestling pros. 

Makah whalers celebrate atop a dead gray whale after a successful hunt seen in this May 17, 1999, file photo, in Neah Bay, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Ross Reynolds talks to historian Joshua Reid about his new book, a history of the Makah tribe  titled, “The Sea is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs."   

The Makahs' tribal land occupies  the Northwest corner of Washington state.  They gained worldwide attention in 1999 when they resumed the traditional practice of hunting for grey whales. Reid's book takes a fresh look at the controversy seen through the  history of the Makahs.

Reid, a member of the Snohomish tribe, was born and raised in Washington. In the fall he’ll be at the University of Washington as an associate professor of history and American Indian Studies.

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