Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

File photo of students playing basketball.
Flickr Photo/Nick Hubbard (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Jonathan Drezner, director of the University of Washington Medicine Center for Sports Cardiology, about sudden cardiac arrest and a new law to help protect Washington's student athletes.

EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Ross Reynolds talks with King County Executive Dow Constantine about his concerns about coal and what he wants the state to do about it.

Lhakpa Gelu Sherpa, who lives in the Seattle area, has summited Everest 15 times. He holds the official record for speed in climbing the world's tallest peak -- 10 hours, 56 minutes and 46 seconds.
Flickr Photo/Christopher Michel (CC BY 2.0)

Months after Lhakpa Gelu Sherpa’s oldest brother died climbing in the Himalayas, Lhakpa Gelu determined that he would summit a Himalayan peak.

His mother protested.

“We just lost your brother a couple months ago, you shouldn’t go,’” she told him. “Don’t go there.”

Hospital chaplain Trudy James.
Screenshot from YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with hospital chaplain Trudy James who for 30 years has encouraged and facilitated conversations about how people want to die, and how they want to live at the end of their lives. A new Seattle-produced documentary film called "Speaking of Dying" looks at her work.

Ross Reynolds talks to reporter Vaughn Palmer from the Vancouver Sun about the rise of shootings in Surrey, Canada. They also discuss the state of the medical marijuana business in Vancouver. 

Executive Constantine and a Seattle delegation visited Boston and New Jersey to learn about their universal preschool models in 2014.
Flickr Photo/Dow Constantine (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his proposed levy to fund an early development program for kids in King County. 

A container ship at the Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Bari Bookout (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with economics reporter Jon Talton about climate change's affect the economy of the Pacific Northwest.

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Do we need zoos to promote conservation?

Kathryn Gillespie, a lecturer and member of the University of Washington’s critical animal studies working group, believes zoos should be phased out.

A gorilla at Port Lympne Wild Animal Park.
Flickr Photo/Willard (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Dr. Kathryn Gillespie, a lecturer and member of the University of Washington's critical animal studies working group about the case against zoos. 

Woodland Park Zoo
Flickr Photo/Jug Jones (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Mike Keele, the former director of elephants habitats at the Oregon Zoo, about why he feels zoos are important. 

Note: On Monday The Record will interview Dr. Kathryn Gillespie of the University of Washington. She explains why we should rethink zoos. 

UW To Give Minority Law Students A Helping Hand

Apr 16, 2015
University of Washington Law School
Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kellye Testy, dean of the University of Washington Law School, about their Gregoire Fellows program. The program aims to boost diversity in the law school and the legal profession.

In this 2012 file photo, Troy Kelley, the Democratic candidate for state auditor at the time, takes questions at a debate.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Brunell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins and local attorney Bob Chadwell about the unfolding story of Washington state auditor Troy Kelley's indictment and what the legal ramifications could be.

Ross Reynolds talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist with the Vancouver Sun, about the controversy around an oil spill in Vancouver's English Bay.

Flickr Photo/Laia Ros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Bill Schrier, former chief technology officer for the City of Seattle, about Tacoma's city-run internet and cable program and why the city is considering leasing it to a private company. 

Kathy Parrish as a child with her father, George Dean, at the YWCA pool in Seattle. The pool would be heated to a higer degree for polio patients at certain times.
Courtesy of Kathy Parrish

Ross Reynolds speaks with polio survivor and post-polio syndrome sufferer Kathy Parrish about her experience as a child with polio and the lasting impacts of the disease. Parrish was diagnosed with the disease in 1950, five years before the Jonas Salk vaccination was declared safe.

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