Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

An Amazon warehouse.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lewis (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Spencer Soper, reporter for Bloomberg News, about the complaints Amazon warehouse workers lodge against the company.

Garfield High School
Flickr Photo/Don Brubeck (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Jesse Hagopian, education reformer and Garfield High School history teacher, about the swift appointment of Larry Nyland as superintendent of Seattle Public Schools. We also hear from board president Sherry Carr.

Author Richard Ford, Livre sur la Place, September 2014.
Flickr Photo/ActuaLitte

Ross Reynolds interviews Pulitzer prize-winning novelist Richard Ford about his new book of novellas, “Let Me Be Frank With You."

It continues the story of Frank Bascombe, which began in Ford's earlier works, "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day" and "Lay of the Land."

Canada Continues To Grapple With Avian Flu

Dec 10, 2014

Ross Reynolds talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about Canada's ongoing avian flu outbreak. They also dicuss the mayor of Victoria refusing to take an oath of allegiance to Queen Elizabeth.

Flickr Photo/megawatts86 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Gwendolyn Hallsmith, executive director of the Public Banking Institute, about the benefits of creating a public bank in Seattle.

In this file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg talks to reporters at a press conference in 2009.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds speaks with King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg about why he decided not to bring felony charges against Seattle Police Officer Adley Shepherd.

Shepherd punched Miyekko Durden-Bosley, 23, in the face after she resisted arrest during a domestic violence call. Durden-Bosely sustained multiple fractures to her orbital socket.

One of the most famous sights on the University of Washington Seattle campus is when the cherry trees bloom in the quad each spring.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds takes a tour of the University of Washington campus with Antoinette Wills and John Bolcer, co-authors of the new book "The University of Washington," which tells the 119 year history of the campus through the buildings. They talk about a 1960s bombing at UW that remains a great unsolved mystery and the story behind the strange stone faces atop all the buildings in the liberal arts Quad.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

UPDATE: 12/11/2014

In August, Uganda struck down a law which punished homosexuality with life in prison – but only on a technicality. Talcott Broadhead, who helps run the Friends New Underground Railroad that ferries LGBT people out of the country, said the celebration that followed was premature.

She said many were put into direct threat, beaten or killed after the repeal of the law. Some areas of the country are even seeing a movement of vigilante justice. “So the fear was no longer imprisonment so much as it was mob justice,” Broadhead said, returning to KUOW’s The Record with an update.

Uber modified the Portland City Mark (as seen here), prompting a cease-and-desist letter from the City of Portland for trademark violation. It was one of a number of legal actions taken against the company. Uber has since removed the image from their blog
Uber Blog

Ross Reynolds speaks with Aaron Mesh, news reporter for the Willamette Week, about why the City of Portland is suing Uber, the San Francisco-based ridesharing company. The city has sought an injunction against the company and sent two cease-and-desist letters -- one for violations of city code, and another for trademark violation in the use of the Portland City Mark.

Two workers walk through the first rings of the tunnel toward Bertha, the SR 99 tunneling machine.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Lynn Peterson, secretary of the Washington State Department of Transportation, about delays to the Seattle tunnel project to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Ross Reynolds talks with Richard Hollinger, a criminology professor at the University of Florida, about how retailers are protecting themselves from employees, who steal more than shoplifters do. Today, the Supreme Court rules that Amazon does not have to pay its warehouse workers for time spent waiting to go through security checks after their shifts.

Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon

She was the nasal-voiced puppeteer behind Red Fraggle on Jim Henson’s Fraggle Rock, and she hung out with David Bowie on the set of Labyrinth.

United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks during a news conference Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Ross Reynolds talks with Frank Schaefer, author of "Defrocked: How A Father's Act of Love Shook the United Methodist Church," about his decision to officiate his son's same-sex marriage and the ensuing case over his dismissal from position as pastor in the Methodist church.

This segment originally aired October 20, 2014.

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle jazz pianist, composer and bandleader Overton Berry about his long long career stretching back 50 years.

Berry played at clubs around the 1962 World’s Fair and performed during Seattle's funk explosion of the 1970s. 

Author Robert Dugoni at a book signing at the Tin Room Bar & Grill in Burien, Wash., in 2009.
Flickr Photo/Michael @ NW Lens

Ross Reynolds interviews local novelist Robert Dugoni about his latest mystery, “My Sister’s Grave."

In it, Seattle homicide cop Tracy Crosswhite learns that the remains of her missing younger sister have been found by two hunters in the woods after 20 years.

In the book's acknowledgments, Dugoni writes that real people inspired the main character: Seattle homicide detective Jennifer Southworth and  former King County Sheriff Sue Rahr. 

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