Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, Region of Boom

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

Ways to Connect

Seattle Police cars
Flickr Photo/ Eric Peacock (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with NPR law enforcement correspondent Martin Kaste about his two-part NPR story on the debate over use-of-force, and how it applies in Seattle.

Earth Ministry's Facebook page

Marcie Sillman speaks with Jessie Dye, outreach director for Earth Ministry, about the 2014 UN Climate Summit and the involvement of religious groups in environmental work.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle Public Schools Interim Superintendent Larry Nyland about the challenges ahead as he takes charge of Seattle Public Schools.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Dr. Danielle Zerr, head of pediatric infectious diseases at Seattle Children’s Hospital, about how to recognize and prevent enterovirus D68, a rare and potentially severe respiratory virus.

After Oso, Being Mayor Is Now A Full-Time Job

Sep 21, 2014
Return to Oso
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin grew up in this small town, like his father and his father before him. Though he moved away when he was younger, Rankin felt he had to move back. The town, he says, is something you can't get out of your soul.

Flickr Photo/@PaulDCocker (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets reactions from Scottish-born locals  Joyce Denton, David McCann and Andrew McDiarmid after the results of Thursday's referendum on Scotland's independence from the United Kingdom.

Flickr Photo/Jo Morrill (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Leonard Garfield, director of the Museum of History and Industry, about MOHAI's efforts to find a new home for the landmark P-I globe.

Flickr Photo/Miss USA Redneck (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about Washington state's proposal to trim university budgets by as much as 15 percent.

Courtesy of Friends of the Conservatory at Volunteer Park

Friends of the Conservatory at Volunteer Park confirmed this morning that their Amorphophallus titanum, better known at the corpse flower, has burst out in all its short-lived and pungent glory.

The flower blooms only about once every three years for 24 to 48 hours and releases a putrid smell to attract carrion beetles. 

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman speaks with Ray Lane, spokesperson for Puget Sound Energy, about why the utility company is about to send one million pieces of rotten-egg-scented mail to their customers (for their own good).

Marcie Sillman speaks with SeattlePI.com reporter Levi Pulkkinen about why King County Public Health officials decided to place an HIV-positive man under court supervision.

Flickr Photo/Alex Dixon (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Nick Bostrom, founder of Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute, about why we should be thinking – now – about how to avoid creating a superintelligent machine that accidentally destroys the world.

KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

There's a frenzy in Pioneer Square this afternoon. A free concert with Pharrell Williams and Sound Garden will be staged before the Super Bowl-winning Seattle Seahawks kick off their season at Century Link Field against the Green Bay Packers at 5:30.

Flickr Photo/camknows (CC-BY-NC-ND)

In low income schools where parents might not speak English, it’s common for parents to not show up for meetings.

And it’s common for educators to throw up their hands and say, “Well, they must not care.”

Angela Pierce

It's been nearly two weeks since black teenager Michael Brown was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. His death touched off a wave of outrage that spread to cities across the country, including Seattle.

On Thursday evening, the Seattle King County NAACP hosted a rally at Pratt Park in the Central District.

Flickr Photo/Great Beyond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This July, the Fife City Council prohibited all marijuana business inside Fife city limits.

That ban has been challenged by State Attorney General Bob Ferguson and the ACLU. The Fife case has a hearing in Pierce County Superior Court at the end of this month. It could end up in Supreme Court by the end of the year.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with James Gregory, director of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project at the University of Washington, about the history of racial exclusion in early 20th century housing covenants.

This segment originally aired May 21, 2014.

Flickr Photo/Colville-Andersen

The Seattle Department of Transportation approved a Bicycle Master Plan in April 2014. Their vision is for biking to become "a comfortable and integral part of daily life in Seattle, for people of all ages and abilities."

But what would it take to get there?

Flickr Photo/King County (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The South Park bridge, which was closed in 2010 for safety reasons, reopened for traffic at 6 a.m. this morning after an entirely new bridge was built on the same location.

On Sunday, with face painting and taco trucks and Senator Patty Murray, the South Park neighborhood celebrated the re-opening of their brand new bascule bridge.

File photo: salmon.
Flickr Photo/Rob Bixby (CC-BYC-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Bill Daniell, an associate professor at the UW's School of Public Health, about Washington's fish consumption rate — a little number that has a big impact.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sharon Lerman, food policy advisor for the City of Seattle, about efforts to get healthy, fresh and affordable food in reach of all Seatttleites.

Danni Askini, the executive director of the Gender Justice League.
Courtesy of Danielle Askini

Marcie Sillman speaks with Danielle Askini, advocacy director for the Gender Justice League, about their efforts to remove health care exclusions affecting transgender people from Washington state employee plans.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

David Hyde gets the scoop from KUOW's Deborah Wang about what happened at the city council meeting Monday night when a historical $15 minimum wage was unanimously passed.

Then, Marcie Sillman speaks with Steve Caldiera, president and CEO of the International Franchise Association, about his plans to sue Seattle to overturn the minimum wage ordinance.

Last, David Hyde talks with the advocacy group 15 Now about whether they will move forward with their own ballot measure to raise the city's minimum wage faster.

From Wikipedia

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW environment reporter Ashley Ahearn about the Environmental Protection Agency's new rules requiring states to cut carbon emissions and how they will affect Washington state.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Martha Rasmussen, organizer of Darrington Day, about the fortuitous connection between the re-opening of state Route 530 and the annual celebration of Darrington Day. Both events take place Saturday May 31.

Flickr Photo/Matt Northam (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Mike Powe, senior research manager at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, about the group's new research report "Older, Smaller, Better: Measuring How the Character of Buildings and Blocks Influences Urban Vitality."

Flickr Photo/MDMA (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher speaks with Susan Collins, a researcher in the University of Washington's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, about a new intervention which combines an anti-craving drug with goal-setting talk therapy to reduce the negative consequences experienced by chronically homeless and alcohol-dependent adults, without necessarily requiring sobriety.

Governor's Office

Ross Reynolds speaks with Anna King, inland correspondent for the Northwest News Network, about the recent discovery by engineers that a 50-year-old math error is to blame for a large crack in the Wanapum Dam.

Metro Parks Tacoma

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jack Wilson, executive director of Metro Parks Tacoma, about how a Parks District differs from a Parks Department. Tacoma has had a parks district since April 1907; Seattle voters will decide whether to establish a Seattle Park District in August 2014.

Flickr Photo/Dow Constantine (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle City Council President Tim Burgess about the recently unveiled proposal to fund universal pre-K in Seattle. The proposal was announced today by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, Councilmember Burgess, and Seattle Schools Superintendent Jose Banda. If approved by the City Council, the proposal will be forwarded to the November ballot.

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