Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, Region of Boom

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

Ways to Connect

A scene of Perugia, Italy, one of Seattle's sister cities.
Flickr Photo/Gigi Griffis (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Mike James, current board member and past president of the Seattle-Perugia Sister City Association, about how the two cities' long friendship was strained by the Amanda Knox trial. Knox, a West Seattleite, was an exchange student living in Perugia at the time of her arrest for the murder of her roommate, Meredith Kercher.

Amgen is moving out, and Expedia is moving into Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Chas Redmond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Douglas Quinby, vice president of research for Phocuswright, a travel industry research firm, about Expedia's 20 years of innovation. The online travel company recently announced that it would move its headquarters from Bellevue to Seattle by 2018.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Kevin Henry, who recently retired from his post as diversity coordinator for the City of Bellevue, about what he learned over two decades of creating cultural conversations.

Seattle Police Department patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Ross Reynolds talks with Ron Smith, president of the Seattle Police Officers' Guild, about his efforts to balance collaborating with the Seattle Police Department while also representing the interests of the Guild's 1,200 officers and sergeants.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT

KUOW's Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, Seattle Times economics columnist,  about the local consequences of the United States lagging behind other countries on infrastructure investment.

2014 file photo: Workers in Indonesia load fish onto a cargo ship bound for Thailand. Seafood caught by slaves mixes in with other fish at a number of sites in Thailand.
AP Photo/Dita Alangkara

Marcie Sillman speaks with Tobias Aguirre, executive director of FishWise, about a recent AP report detailing slavery in Asian fisheries and what Pacific Northwest shoppers can do to avoid purchasing seafood that may have been caught by slaves.

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks to branding consultant Kevin Paul Scott about the backlash to Starbucks' #RaceTogether initiative, and why it might still be a good idea.

An orca pod travels past the Seattle skyline. A new study shows that pods are most likely led by older females.
Courtesy of NOAA/Candice Emmons

Nearly every mammal on earth reproduces until they die – except for humans, and two species of whales.

A new study shows that older, female killer whales are most likely to lead their pods as they travel through the salmon foraging grounds of the Pacific Northwest.

Flickr Photo/hapal (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Page Ulrey, senior deputy prosecuting attorney with King County's Office of Elderly and Vulnerable Adult Abuse, about House Bill 1499, which seeks to increase prosecutorial power in cases of elder abuse in Washington.

Crowds of homeless people often gather on the sidewalks of downtown Seattle near social-service providers.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Ross Reynolds speaks with Katherine Beckett, co-author with Steven Herbert of the book, "Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America," about her research into interactions between the Seattle Police Department and people experiencing homelessness in downtown Seattle.

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman speaks with Patricia Coffey and Maggie Kilbourne-Brook, both of the Seattle-based global health nonprofit PATH, about the Caya countoured diaphragm, also known as the SILCS diaphragm, which was recently approved by the FDA.

Seattle Police guard a building during protests on Dec. 6, 2014, in response to the killings of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association and a long-time follower of police reform in Seattle, about how a decades-old city ordinance may hinder Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole's efforts to reform the department.

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON

 Ross Reynolds speaks with Sarah Dunne, Legal Director of the ACLU of Washington, about a plan to fix Yakima's voting problems, which a Federal judge has said "routinely suffocate the voting preferences of the Latino minority."

File photo of Seattle skyline.
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's David Schmader about the movie version of the bestselling book, "Fifty Shades of Grey." Both the book and the movie are set in downtown Seattle.

Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber announced his resignation on Friday, Feb. 13, in light of controversies involving his fiancee.
Flickr Photo/Oregon DOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with political scientist Jim Moore, of Pacific University, about the scandals that led to the resignation of Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber and the future governance of the state.

Flickr Photo/Still Burning (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1Svg0qt

Ross Reynolds speaks with Rep. Zack Hudgins, D-Tukwila, about bipartisan legislation being considered in Olympia this week. House Bill 1885 and its companion Senate Bill 5775 aim to reduce Washington state's high property crime rate by, in part, reducing jail time for burglars and thieves. The proposal is backed by extensive data and research from The Council of State Governments Justice Center

Michael Young speaks at a cherry tree gift reception at the University of Washington on May 20, 2014.
Flickr Photo/University Marketing (CC-BY-NC-ND)

    

Ross Reynolds speaks with Washington state Sen. Barbara Bailey, chair of the Senate Committee on Higher Education, about University of Washington President Michael Young's surprise decision to leave and take the top job at Texas A&M University.

A view from inside Sea-Tac airport.
Flickr Photo/Nancy White (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for the Seattle Times, about expansion plans at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Courtesy Jason Yeatman

Two years ago Jason Yeatman, a researcher at the University of Washington, stumbled into a secret corridor of the mind.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Paul Throne of the Washington State Department of Health about why some groups of Washingtonians decline to vaccinate against measles and what that means for the rest of the state.

Virginia Mason hospital in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rob Ketcherside (CC-BY-NC-ND) http://bit.ly/28QrplE

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about how Virginia Mason Medical Center discovered a rare, drug-resistant bacteria that was spreading from patient to patient, and why they didn't inform the infected.

Microsoft store
Flickr Photo/Joe Wilcox (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Todd Bishop, editor and co-founder of GeekWire, about what's new in the Windows 10 operating system.

A protester of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, holds up a sign reading "No justice, no peace" -- a popular slogan.
Flickr Photo/Shawn Semmler (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with language journalist Ben Zimmer about the varied interpretations of the popular protest slogan, "No justice, no peace."

Seattle Police officers in the old uniform (left) and newly redesigned uniform (right).
Courtesy of Seattle Police Department

The Seattle Police Department is rolling out new looks for its shield, uniforms and police cars. Gone are the “light blue bubble” cars and “theme park” uniforms as the department ushers in a darker, sleeker style.

Cal McAllister, founder of local advertising agency The Wexley School for Girls, told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record that in a lot of ways it’s an improvement. The uniform retains a confident blue color, but is less busy and decorative.

New Year's fireworks at the Space Needle.
Flickr Photo/sea turtle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman checks in with BJ Fogg, director of the Stanford Persuasive Tech Lab and creator of the Tiny Habits system of behavior modification, about whether or either of them were able to keep their 2014 New Year's resolutions.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT

She loves dirt and hates sunlight. Seattle Magazine named her one of 2013’s most influential people, except she’s not really a person. She’s Bertha, the world’s biggest tunnel boring machine, charged with digging out the replacement path for the Alaskan Way Viaduct under Seattle.

Her profile on the Washington State Department of Transportation site lists her occupation as a tunneling specialist, but right now she’s stuck and has been since December 6. In light of her current predicament, the decision to name the machine, and thus humanize it, could be a shrewd move.

Marcie Sillman talks to Jon Talton, economic and business columnist for the Seattle Times, about the middle class in the Pacific Northwest and around the country.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Mike Wagers, chief operating officer at Seattle Police Department, about how an anonymous computer programmer with an outsized data request helped prompt the Seattle Police Department's first-ever Hackathon.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Representative Derek Kilmer, a Democrat representing Washington's 6th Congressional District, about the Senate passage of The American Savings Promotion Act, a bipartisan bill to allow more financial institutions nationwide to offer prize-linked savings accounts.

In this file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg talks to reporters at a press conference in 2009.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds speaks with King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg about why he decided not to bring felony charges against Seattle Police Officer Adley Shepherd.

Shepherd punched Miyekko Durden-Bosley, 23, in the face after she resisted arrest during a domestic violence call. Durden-Bosely sustained multiple fractures to her orbital socket.

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