Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

Ways to Connect

Ross Reynolds speaks with Brandy Sincyr, a program assistant with Columbia Legal Services and the author of a report counting homeless students in Washington, about why the group thinks schools have been undercounting their homeless students.

Seattle students Tamar Rosenblum, 7, and Natalya McConnell, 10.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke speaks with Natalya McConnell and Tamar Rosenblum. They returned to school today, along with more than 50,000 Seattle students, after the teachers' union reached a tentative contract agreement with the school district. 

rain gif
Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds speaks with Cynthia Barnett, author of "Rain: A Natural and Cultural History," about the unexpected things she learned while writing a book about rain. The book has been longlisted for a National Book Award.

Jerry Baker is seen with wife Deborah Stephenson and daughter  Julia Baker after he finished this year's Seattle to Portland ride — his 36th STP.
Courtesy of Cascade Bicycle Club

Ross Reynolds talks to bicyclist Jerry Baker, who won the first Seattle to Portland bicycle ride in 1979 and has ridden in every STP since, about participating in the 36th annual ride this year along with an estimated 10,000 others.

This segment originally aired July 10. Baker died Sept. 10 at age 73 of leukemia.  

China President Xi Jinping.
Flickr Photo/Global Panorama (Michel Temer) (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Oq11MA

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton about the economic connections between Washington state and China, and how they might play out in Chinese President Xi Jinping's upcoming visit.

Listener Sarah Johnson posted this picture from Green Lake Elementary with the message, 'We love our teachers.'
Courtesy of Sarah Johnson

David Hyde speaks with Richelle Dickerson, co-president of West Woodland Parent-Teacher Association, about why she and other parents have been supporting the Seattle teachers strike.

Mosquito fleet steamers are seen at Houghton, Wash., in 1945.
Courtesy of MOHAI

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Leonard Garfield, director of the Museum of History and Industry, about a time when Seattleites got around on a "swarm of little steamers" known as the Mosquito Fleet.

A seedling planted in a burned area of the Klamath National Forest in 2008.
Flickr photo/USFS Region 5

Marcie Sillman speaks with Mike Tupper, deputy assistant director for resources and planning at the Bureau of Land Management, about how conservationists are helping Washington's wild lands recover.

The ferry Leschi arrives at the Kirkland dock on Lake Washington in April 1946.
Kirkland Heritage Society, City of Kirkland/Charles Morgan Negative

Marcie Sillman speaks with King County Councilmember Rod Dembowski about his proposal to introduce passenger ferries to carry commuters across Lake Washington.

Houseboats on Lake Union in the Eastlake area.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marcie Sillman speaks with Ken Brettmann, senior water manager for the Army Corps of Engineers' Seattle District, about why Lake Washington and Lake Union have hit record low water levels, what the consequences might be for boaters and floating homes, and what he's doing to fix the problem.

Smoke from wildfires in the Northwest stream in this photo taken from the International Space Station.
NASA

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sarah Mirk, online editor for Bitch Media, about what Portlanders are doing in response to Oregon's drought. (Hint: not much.)

Flickr photo/Washington Department of Natural Resources

Marcie Sillman speaks with former wildland firefighter Rob Palmer about his brother Andy Palmer. Andy Palmer died while fighting fires in California in 2008, in what became known as the Dutch Creek Incident.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Jeffrey Duchin, health officer at Public Health – Seattle & King County, who offers some reassurance to parents about possible contamination of surgical gear at Seattle Children's Bellevue campus.  The satellite surgery center discovered a pattern of improper equipment cleaning, which could have exposed as many as 12,000 people to diseases like hepatitis or HIV.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Capt. Chris Fowler, commander of the Seattle Police Department's West Precinct, about the Neighborhood Response Team. The group of six officers patrols a nine-block area in downtown Seattle, using a new kind of policing to fight what business owners have called "downtown disorder."

Wildfires send up plumes of smoke across Washington on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015, in this photo produced using NASA's Worldview tool.
NASA Worldview

We experience the eerie, smoky sunsets. We hear the fire names like Wolverine and North Star.

These are just small glimpses into the huge picture of the West’s wildfires in 2015. Randy Eardly sees that long view at the National Interagency Fire Center. He told KUOW's David Hyde that nearly 1.3 million acres have burned so far in Washington and Oregon.

Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch watches the closing moments of an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals on Dec. 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

Marcie Sillman speaks with GeekWire's Todd Bishop about a partnership between Microsoft and the NFL that, among other things, will allow fans access to data about players' on-field speed and distance.

Methow Valley News staffer Darla Hussey took this photograph from a location a half-mile south of Twisp.
Methow Valley News photo/Darla Hussey

When residents of the Methow Valley want updates on the fires in their area, many of them have turned to the Facebook page of the local paper, the Methow Valley News.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Alex Hymer, co-owner of Sweet River Bakery in Pateros, Washington. The bakery is about an hour south of Winthrop and Twisp, and has been serving up caffeine and internet access to wildfire evacuees from the two towns.

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

When two black women stormed a Seattle rally for Sen. Bernie Sanders last week, the crowd booed and shouted at them to get off the stage. The women refused to back down.

“Now you've covered yourselves and your white supremacist liberalism,” one yelled back.

You don't have to be at 10,000 feet in the Rocky Mountain National Park to check out the Perseid meteor shower.
Flickr Photo/Dave Dugdale (CC BY SA 2.0)

David Hyde speaks with Alice Enevoldsen, local NASA Solar System Ambassador, about where in town Seattleites might be able to catch the once-a-year stellar display known as the Perseid Meteor Shower.

Portland Is Getting Expensive, Too

Aug 11, 2015

Todd Mundt speaks with Sarah Mirk, online editor of Bitch Media, about the recent upward creep in Portland Oregon's housing prices.

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Todd Mundt speaks with GeekWire's Todd Bishop about the escalating size of benefits packages offered by tech companies.

For four Saturdays this August, Pike Street between Broadway and 12th will be closed to car traffic.
Google Maps

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Heidi Hall, business districts advocate for the City of Seattle Office of Economic Development, about an experiment to make three blocks of Pike Street pedestrian only. The experiment will take place during four Saturday nights this August.

Marcie Sillman speaks to Todd Bishop about what's new in Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system.

Pramila Jayapal talks with former Washington GOP head Chris Vance at a taping of KUOW's 'Week in Review' at Columbia City Theatre on June 5, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

David Hyde speaks with Senator Pramila Jayapal, the former leader of the immigrant rights organization OneAmerica who now represents Seattle's 37th Legislative District, about what it's been like to transition from activism to elected office.

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

Most of us in Seattle aren't ready for The Big One.

Eric Holdeman, former director of the King County Office of Emergency Management, said we shouldn’t expect outsiders to swoop in and save us when a long-anticipated massive earthquake hits (and it will hit, we just don’t know when).

Single-family homes such as this one in Greenwood could be rezoned to become a multi-family dwelling should draft proposals by Seattle's affordable housing task force come to fruition.
Courtesy of Hana Sevcikova

Ross Reynolds speaks with Erica C. Barnett about leaked draft recommendations from Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's Housing Affordability and Livability Committee. Some of the recommendations would require a dramatic rethinking of the way Seattleites see home.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for The Seattle Times, about why the Washington State Legislature repealed a $57 million tax break for Microsoft.

Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Hobson’s radical philosophy was born when he met a 24-year-old woman who was schizophrenic, HIV positive and addicted to crack. And she was pregnant.

It was early in Hobson’s 31-year tenure at the Downtown Emergency Services Center.

ferry
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lynn Griffith, chief of Washington State Ferries, about what passengers say about the new reservation system, what "new ferry smell" is like and why she jumped in the water in front of all of her employees.

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