Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

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Ericka Frodsham is one of 50 to 60 prostitutes who work on Aurora Avenue North, known as a track. This is one of two tracks where prostitutes work in the Seattle area. Photographer Mike Kane followed her one evening, separately from the story below.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Why is there so much prostitution on Aurora Avenue in North Seattle? Beth Quintana, who lives in North Seattle near Aurora, asked KUOW’s Local Wonder project, so we sent reporter Posey Gruener to find out.

Courtesy of Devin Kelly via @avaderaday

Bill Radke speaks with Devin Kelly, the man behind the @avaderaday Instagram feed, about the lighter side of Darth Vader.

KEXP DJ John Richards began the 'Mom Show' a decade ago after his mother died of cancer.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

When KEXP DJ John Richards lost his mom to lung cancer, he went on the air, played songs that he played at her funeral and talked about what he was going through.

A decade later, Richards still does that on the anniversary of his mom's death. But now listeners get involved too.

Bill Radke talks to John Cook, writer and co-founder of Geekwire, about three Seattle startups that are innovators in their field: Arivale, Pluto VR and OfferUp, which are all on Geekwire's "Seattle 10."

Lead zookeeper Hugh Bailey and zoo veterinarian Dr. Darin Collins take a close look at the newborn girl behind the scenes at Woodland Park Zoo.
Woodland Park Zoo

It’s a girl!

Nadiri, a 19-year-old gorilla at the Woodland Park Zoo, gave birth to her daughter at 11:30 a.m. Friday.

Nadiri, a 19-year-old gorilla at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, is pregnant. Her due date is Thursday, Nov. 19.
Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren/Woodland Park Zoo

Zookeepers have noticed that Nadiri, a gorilla at the Woodland Park Zoo, has been restless at night and walking around more. For two weeks, they’ve watched her on closed-circuit television, waiting for signals that her baby is ready to arrive.

Port of Seattle cranes loom overhead. After a port slowdown last year, retailers and growers are trying to repair the damage of lost business.
Flickr Photo/Dennis Hamilton (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SxOe9r

Ross Reynolds speaks with Fred Felleman, Seattle's most-recently elected Port commissioner, about why he thinks Seattle's citizens should pay attention to the doings at the Port of Seattle.

Tim Eyman
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Tim Eyman's latest tax-reducing intitiative, I-1366, passed handily in Tuesday's election.

Eyman talked to David Hyde about why he thought the initiative was necessary and about how he feels to get the victory while he's under investigation over allegations of campaign finance violations.

The Coast Guard icebreaker HEALY has returned to Seattle. The summer ice has gotten easier to navigate, which made it possible for the HEALY to travel alone.
U.S. Coast Guard

An American icebreaker has returned home to Seattle after a historic mission to the North Pole.

The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy broke its first ice floe in August, just north of Alaska.

Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/ http://bit.ly/1QiDCKB

There's a justice gap in Washington state, according to a study published Thursday. It says that low-income Washington residents face multiple civil legal problems, but few can afford the help they need.

Navy veteran Donald Lollis said he's been sleeping on the streets for six months. 'They give you an honorable discharge and you just do the best you can. And that's how I've been living.'
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

It's 3 a.m. on the first day of a massive free clinic at Seattle Center. Anyone who needs medical, dental or vision care can find help here today — first come, first served. 

An Iraq vet named Ryan Mielcarek addressed the crowd: “By a quick show of hands, do we have any veterans in the audience here today?”

Mielcarek is the South Sound platoon leader with the veteran volunteer group, The Mission Continues. Their goal is to connect with veterans experiencing homelessness, more than 600 in King County according to official estimates.

Students at Skyline High School in Sammamish play Gaelic football, which looks a lot like soccer -- until you catch the ball with your hands.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Irish President Michael Higgins is visiting Seattle this week. Thursday morning, he traveled to Skyline High School in Sammamish to watch a game of Gaelic football, a sport many locals probably have never seen.

It's sort of like soccer, except you can catch the ball. And then dribble it, or punt, or bump, or punch.

Judie Zersen, 75, auditioned because of "a passionate desire" to meet Norwegian family.  Zersen missed a chance to visit Norway, back in the 1960s, and it's been a great regret. "But now it's possible."
KUOW photo/Posey Gruener

They came from Bellingham and Poulsbo and Ballard. They're as young as 19 and as old as 75.

They're all at the ACT Theater in Seattle because they’re Norwegian Americans who want to be cast on the seventh season of “Alt For Norge” – a reality TV show whose name loosely translates as “Anything For Norway.”

It’s a two-time Norwegian Emmy winner, but its cast is all-American. On the show, 12 Norwegian Americans who've never been to the homeland face off in heritage competitions like cross-country skiing or Norwegian swearing.

Hawkeye Huey with his FujiFilm camera.
Aaron Huey

When you're 5 years old, you have a different perspective on the world. And that's not just because you're shorter than a lot of the people around you.

Hawkeye Huey (yes, that's his real name) has been taking photographs for the past year or so, and the results garnered a spot on Rolling Stone's list of top 100 Instagram accounts. The Record's David Hyde talked to Hawkeye and his dad, National Geographic photographer Aaron Huey.

Jonathan Grant, Jon Grant
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Jeannie Yandel speaks with political reporter Josh Feit about how a downtown land deal was felled by a text message. Feit is the politics editor at Seattle Met magazine and founder/editor of their politics blog PubliCola.

Amazon.com
Flickr Photo/Soumit Nandi (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1VOQgCK

David Hyde speaks with Todd Bishop about why Amazon (is rumored to be) opening a brick and mortar store in Seattle, and how he got his hands on some blueprints. Also: the device that could save Microsoft.

People form a greeting line as Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife step out of a Boeing 747 at Everett's Paine Field.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit.

"Spite Mounds," 1910. The most famous image of the Denny Regrade is often described as depicting "spite mounds." But writer David Williams says, at least in one case, it wasn't spite at all that kept these mounds standing. Just paperwork.
Courtesy of University of Washington Special Collections/Asahel Curtis

There’s an easy explanation for all of mountain-moving ambition of Seattle’s forefathers.

“They were crazy,” geology writer David Williams told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.

cat drinking water
Flickr Photo/Philip Kraaijenbrink (CC BY-ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1WQ6k9M

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Maia Bellon, director of the Washington State Department of Ecology, about Governor Jay Inslee's proposal for revised water quality standards.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

More mental health treatment and gun control won't necessarily prevent mass shootings, but a new California law might help, says a public health researcher.

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kristin Eberhard, a senior researcher with the Sightline Institute who wrote about Oregon's new law, effective January 2016, which will automatically register eligible voters through the state Department of Motor Vehicles.

Dr. David Rawlings (left) and Dr. Andrew Scharenberg (right) pioneered a gene editing method that gives human T cells the ability to resist HIV and either kill HIV or tumors. The research could have clinical applications in as early as a few years.
Courtesy of Seattle Children's Research Institute

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. David Rawlings, director of the Center for Immunity and Immunotherapies at Seattle Children's Research Institute, about how his team pioneered a breakthrough gene-editing technique that could help patients with HIV, genetic blood diseases and certain cancers. Their study was published in the September issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Martin Friedman, an anti-racist organizer and co-facilitator of Undoing Racism workshops with The People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, about some of the ideas that informed his own anti-racist organizing.

The city of Seattle is scaling back plans for its subsidized preschool program.
Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC BY-NC-SA)/http://bit.ly/1LQhs3d

Ross Reynolds speaks with Holly Miller, interim director of the Seattle Preschool Program, about how Seattle is working to avoid the "fade out" effect.

Heather Anderson, trail name Anish, posted this picture of herself after beating the Appalachian Trail unsupported record.
Facebook Photo/Anish Hikes

A Seattle-area woman has set a new speed record for an unsupported hike along the Appalachian Trail: 54 days, 7 hours, 48 minutes.

To put Heather Anderson’s feat in perspective:

File photo of Joint Base Lewis-McChord headquarters.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Outrage is growing over the potential discharge of a Special Forces soldier from Joint Base Lewis McCord who beat an Afghan police commander accused of raping a young boy.

The practice of bacha bazi – an Afghan term for powerful men using adolescent boys for sex – and just what American troops have or haven’t done about it is getting renewed attention now, but the debate isn't new.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, at a banquet in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

David Hyde speaks with David Bachman, a professor of international studies at the University of Washington, about why Seattle was Chinese President Xi Jinping's first stop on this trip to the U.S.

Smoking marijuana joint
Flickr Photo/ashton (CC BY)/http://bit.ly/1NRQEBg

Jeannie Yandel talks to Sarah Mirk, online editor for Bitch Media, about Oregon's recreational marijuana law and why it allows Oregonians with marijuana convictions on their record to wipe the slate clean.

Chinese President Xi Jinping visits Bali, Indonesia for the 2013  Applied Power Electronics Conference.
Flickr Photo/APEC 2013 (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1LJ6asV

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of technology news site GeekWire, about why Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to Seattle is putting U.S. tech leaders on the spot. Bishop wrote a FAQ on President Xi's visit for GeekWire.

Sawhorse Revolution designed and built this tiny house, with the intent to donate it to the homeless camp known as Nickelsville. The idea is to have tiny houses rather than tents at this new homeless camp in the Central District.
Courtesy of Alec Gardner

"The Nest," as the students call it, is a serious step up from a tent.

There's no plumbing or electricity, but it's watertight, insulated and has walls and a lock. And it was designed with a homeless person in mind.

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