Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, Region of Boom

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

Ways to Connect

Bob Johnson started at the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in San Francisco, in 1976. He took charge of the Seattle office in 1977, and led the organization for decades, until his retirement in 2016.
Courtesy of Bob Johnson

Bill Radke speaks with Bob Johnson, former executive director of the International Rescue Committee in Seattle, about what it was like to settle refugees in our region for nearly four decades. Johnson retired from his position earlier this year.

Kim Malcolm speaks with AP reporter Martha Belisle about the problems at Washington state's largest psychiatric hospital and why Governor Jay Inslee fired the chief of Western State Hospital.

Rebecca Yeung (left), and Kimberly Yeung retrieve the Loki Lego Launcher outside Ritzville, WA, after the ballooncraft returned from the stratosphere.
Courtesy of the Yeung Family

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle sisters Rebecca, 11, and Kimberly Yeung, 9, about bringing their "spacecraft," the Loki Lego Launcher, to the White House Science Fair

Before the White House, the Loki Lego Launcher was just a family project. The girls built the craft at home, with equipment and instructions they found online. They made it out of plywood, arrow shafts, rope, a helium balloon and some styrofoam feet "in the event of a water landing." 

Equal Pay Day pin
Flickr Photo/Michael Panse (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/mhQxLC

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle resident Ruchika Tulshyan, author of "The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In The Workplace," about why companies and managers should be taking the lead on closing the gender pay gap.

  Bill Radke speaks with local filmmaker Delaney Ruston about her documentary "Screenagers."

Fishermen's Terminal, Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with UW Fisheries professor Ray Hillborn about a plan he says would create more fish in the ocean, more catch for fishermen and more profitable fisheries. It might make some fishermen very rich and others very angry.

Bill Radke speaks with Jen Graves, art critic for The Stranger, about where to go and what to see at the first Thursday Art Walk this April in Seattle.

The first Trump tower? Donald Trump's grandfather, Frederick Trump, leased a business that offered "private rooms for ladies" in Seattle's red light district.
Puget Sound Regional Archives

Donald Trump, the presidential candidate, is 100 percent Queens. But his grandfather, Frederick Trump, built his nest egg in the Northwest.

Taproot Theatre lost letters from its marquee in the gas leak blast on March 9, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Bill Radke speaks with Scott Nolte, co-founder and producing artistic director of Taproot Theatre in Greenwood, about how the business survived a 2009 arson and how that experience affected their response to the gas explosion last month. 

SLIDESHOW: 17 Fantastical Murals Rise Up From Greenwood Explosion

Bill Radke speaks with Lisa Stiffler, author of a GeekWire series following eight women who joined the tech workforce twenty years ago. Stiffler was interested to learn how the women made their way in an industry dominated by men.

Btoo Allami (left) and Nayyef Hrebid (right) met in 2004, during the seige of Ramadi. Hrebid was a translator with the U.S. Marines, and Allami was an Iraqi soldier. "I saw him," says Hrebid, 'and I was like, oh my God, he is so handsome. He is perfect.'
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

This is a story about love and war; love lost and love found again.

In 2004, Nayyef Hrebid was an interpreter for the U.S. Marines in Iraq, and Btoo Allami was a soldier with the Iraqi Army.

Ramadi General Hospital had been taken over by insurgents, and Hrebid and Allami were part of a mission to reclaim the hospital. It was a dangerous mission, in a dangerous city, at a dangerous time in the war. 

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about neoliberalism, what it means for the 2016 election cycle and the consequences for the American middle class.

A tree fell on Sunday, March 14, 2016 on 112th Street Northeast, east of Forbes Creek Drive in Kirkland.
KUOW Photo/Kim Malcolm

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State climatologist Nick Bond about some of the reasons behind the very active weather the region has been experiencing recently.

Bill Hobson, former executive director of the Downtown Emergency Services Center in Seattle, is interviewed Thursday, April 5, 2007.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Tim Burgess about the impact of Bill Hobson on Seattle. Hobson was the former executive director of Seattle's Downtown Emergency Service Center. He died Friday at the age of 76.

Also: Listen to an archived interview between Hobson and KUOW's Marcie Sillman, originally aired last summer, at the time of Hobson's retirement from the DESC.

Stock

It’s been raining. A lot. And not just the usual pleasant misty stuff – it’s been pouring down in buckets. We’ve had so much rain that this winter has officially gone down in the history books as Seattle’s wettest.

But was it rainy enough for you to use an umbrella? Producer Posey Gruener goes out with a microphone, to settle a bitter Seattle feud once and for all.

Our featured citizens: Hannah Baughman, Nathan Stuart, Liz and Jacob Morris, Ruth Teichroeb and Jeffrey Lynn Carter.

And look below to see what other people told us online:

Bill Radke speaks with television critic Melanie McFarland about new show The Real O'Neals, which is loosely based on the life of Seattle-based sex columnist and Stranger editor Dan Savage.

A scene from 'SEVEN'
Facebook Photo/Seven - A Documentary Play

Bill Radke speaks with Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about why she agreed to join the cast of "SEVEN", a documentary play about the lives of remarkable women around from around the globe.

Justice Yu will read a monologue based on the life of Afghan women's rights advocate Farida Azizi in a sold out performance at Town Hall this Sunday, March 6.

Marshall Islanders gather at the Burke Museum in Seattle to mark the anniversary of the droping of a hydrogen bomb on Bikini Atoll in 1954.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

On March 1, 1954, the United States dropped a 15 megaton hydrogen bomb on Bikini Atoll. In the years since, Marshall Islanders, or Marshallese, have marked the anniversary as a national holiday and a day of mourning. Producer Posey Gruener went to the Burke Museum in Seattle to speak to some Marshallese who gathered to mark the occasion.

Bill Radke speaks with Anna Griffin, reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting, about the dramatic, peaceful end to a 41-day standoff at Oregon's Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

The surrender of the remaining four holdouts was broadcast live via cellphone to a "riveting and incredibly disturbing" audio feed on YouTube. "It's as if," Griffin said "you could be inside the white Bronco with O.J. Simpson as he livestreams himself."

Bill Radke speaks with GeekWire's Todd Bishop about Amazon and T-Mobile's star-studded Super Bowl ads, and what they reveal about the ambitions of those local companies. 

Bill Radke speaks with Darrion Sjoquist, a Starbucks barista and member of the labor group Working Washington, about why he and other workers are calling for Seattle City Council to regulate scheduling of shift work.

Purple Heart
Flickr Photo/Phil Renaud (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ex7KSS

Bill Radke speaks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the resignation of Rep. Graham Hunt after allegations that the Washington state lawmaker exaggerated his military service record.

Also, Radke talks with Doug Sterner, a veteran who has spent decades investigating fraudulent claims of military service, for his take on why people distort, exaggerate, or lie about military service.

A construction crane working on a building is shown with Port of Seattle cranes in the background on a foggy summer day, Monday, July 15, 2014, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why some people see a recession coming our way and what that could mean for the Seattle boom.

Donald Slyter, a resident of The Jungle, a homeless encampment in Seattle believed to have been around since the 1930s. It gets its name from the name for homeless encampments at the time -- hobo jungles.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

There’s a reason it’s called The Jungle.

It’s a stretch of woods between Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood and Interstate 5.

James Q. Tran, 33, and Jeannine L. Brooks, 45, also known as Jean Zapata, were fatally shot there Tuesday night; three others were wounded.

 Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1JCLnwP

Bill Radke speaks with Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. He said that middle class incomes have struggled to keep pace, but as a whole the state has been doing very well. 

Bill Radke speaks with Susan Hutchison, chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. She said there's a difference between those who live in downtown Seattle -- who have a sense that the engine is roaring due to Amazon -- and those who live in smaller cities or Eastern Washington. 

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle City Councilmember Tim Burgess about plans to regulate online short-term rentals in the city of Seattle.

A drawing by a child in Professor Kristina Olson's study. Olson has found that transgender and non-trans girls have an equally deep sense of their gender identity.
Courtesy of Marlo Mack

When Kristina Olson, a psychology professor at the University of Washington, started looking into research on transgender children, she was surprised. It was thin at best.

Data from decades ago said that 80 percent of transgender kids revert to their born gender, but Olson was skeptical.

So she started the TransYouth Project to track transgender children to adulthood. The project has worked with 65 children across the U.S. and Canada – so far. Some are as young as 3.

Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop about how a virtual reality cottage industry has grown up in Seattle.  

Bill Radke speaks with Dr. Jennifer Stuber, professor in the UW's School of Social Work and founder of the suicide prevention organization Forefront, about Washington state's new Suicide Prevention Plan.

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