Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, Region of Boom

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

Ways to Connect

Coach Joe Kennedy.
Courtesy of First Liberty Institute

Last fall, an assistant football coach at Bremerton High School lost his job for praying on the 50-yard line after games. Now Joe Kennedy is suing to get his job back and to keep a promise he made with God. KUOW's Bill Radke spoke with Kennedy about church, state and the playing field. 

Art critic Jen Graves.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Jen Graves, art critic for The Stranger, about the Seattle Art Fair. The fair, which takes place from August 4-7 at CenturyLink Field Event Center (and other venues around the city), is an opportunity for big gallerists to sell (very expensive) art and for local artists to expand their audiences.

The 1936 Olympic team crewed the wooden Husky Clipper, which now hangs in a place of honor above the the crew dining hall.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

Marcie Sillman speaks with Judy Willman, daughter of Joe Rantz, about how finding "swing" with the 1936 University of Washington rowing team changed her father's life. The nine boys on that legendary team beat staggering odds to win gold in the Berlin Olympics.

Birkenstocks
Flickr Photo/Simon D (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/f6vQ64

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop about why Birkenstock has decided to stop selling their iconic shoes through Amazon's online marketplace.

'If, for my birthday dinner, I could order anything I wanted, I'd request a Maine lobster or a tarantula spider. ' - David George Gordon
Courtesy of Chugrad McAndrews

Deborah Wang speaks with Seattleite David George Gordon, author of the "Eat-a-Bug Cookbook," about his favorite insects to eat and why. Plus: what he serves to trick-or-treaters at Halloween.

Want to get started with entomophagy? See Gordon's recipe for deep-fried tarantulas. Or head over to Central Co-op in Seattle to pick up some crickets.

Alissa Wehrman and Eula Scott Bynoe.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

High-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, as well as shootings of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge, prompted Eula Scott Bynoe to organize a public discussion with white people about race.


Preschoolers huddle beneath a table at Green Tree Early Learning Center in Seattle, which conducts monthly earthquake drills.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton about why so many Washington state schools are unprepared for a major earthquake.


Bill Radke speaks with Luke Timmerman about what went wrong during Seattle-based Juno Therapeutics' clinical trial of an immunotherapy treatment for leukemia and what it might mean for the company.

Todd Bishop uses Amazon Dash to keep on top of his young son's Play-Doh needs.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Nintendo's surprise success in Pokemon Go and Amazon Dash's foray into toys. 

Dallas police detain a driver after several police officers were shot in downtown Dallas, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Snipers apparently shot police officers during protests and some of the officers are dead, the city's police chief said in a statement.
AP Photo/LM Otero

Bill Radke speaks with civil rights lawyer Connie Rice about how she helped transform the culture of policing from a warrior model to a guardian model at the LAPD, and why she believes such changes are possible elsewhere.

Artist Amanda Manitach
Courtesy of Amanda Manitach

Bill Radke speaks with Stranger art critic Jen Graves about why listeners should go see Amanda Manitach's exhibition, "Nothing Left To Say." The show opens Thursday, July 7 and runs until July 30 at Roq La Rue

Seattle skyline
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about whether or not Seattle can be affordable and have a booming economy. 

Jasmine Jackson (left) recommends events in Seattle, Alaina Caldwell (center) recommends restaurants, and Eula Scott Bynoe (right) interviews the people to know about.
Courtesy of 'Hella Black Hella Seattle'

Bill Radke speaks with Eula Scott Bynoe, Alaina Caldwell and Jasmine Jackson, the three women behind the Seattle-centric podcast Hella Black Hella Seattle. The podcast is a short-run summer series all about how people (especially people of color) can get out, have fun, and create community while the weather is warm.

Bill Radke speaks with Shaun Knittel, spokesman for Seattle gay nightclub Neighbours, about how he along with 750 other people narrowly escaped a tragic fate on New Year's Eve, 2013. 

Todd Bishop does his best to explain LinkedIn to KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about what Microsoft's $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn means for the company and the region. "LinkedIn is to business what Facebook is to the rest of our lives," Bishop said. 

BOSTON TERRIER, 2014 Gouache on cotton 25 x 32 inches
Courtesy of Greg Kucera Gallery, Seattle

Bill Radke gets recommendations of what art to see in Seattle this June from Jen Graves, art critic for The Stranger. She recommends seeing Time to Take a Walk at Greg Kucera gallery. Graves also recommends 100% Kanekalon at the Northwest African American Museum.

Forterra/Florangela Davila

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Gene Duvernoy, president and CEO of Forterra, and Estela Ortega, executive director of El Centro de la Raza, about why their organizations are teaming up to create affordable housing and what building apartments has to do with saving the environment.

Soldiers place their hats on rack just inside the mess hall doors before eating breakfast in the controlled monitoring area at JBLM.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Sebastian Junger, author of the new book "TRIBE: On Homecoming and Belonging," about why soldiers long for war and what civilians are missing out on.

The boxy-style house on the left has been finished since this photo was taken in the summer of 2015. The house sold for $1,145,000, according to county records. Greenwood
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The number of million-dollar homes in the Seattle area has tripled over the past four years, according to a Seattle Times analysis of data from the real estate website Trulia.

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about how and why we've seen such a steep increase in the worth of single-family homes and whether Seattle is becoming the next San Francisco.

Demands posted in a window of the occupied space at Matteo Ricci College.
Courtesy of Liberation News/@comradevitaly

Bill Radke speaks with Fiza Mohammed, a fourth-year undergraduate student who helped to organize the occupation of Matteo Ricci College at Seattle University. 

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why he disagrees with a U.S. Chamber of Commerce study that ranks Seattle 11 out of 25 American cities in terms of "readiness to capitalize on the inevitable shift to a digital economy."

Is your brick building at serious risk in an earthquake?
Flickr Photo/Helen Cook (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/poMYZ

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton about why Seattle still has over a thousand unreinforced masonry buildings (full list here), despite knowledge of their danger in an earthquake and the availability of technology to make them safer.

Doughton is co-author with Daniel Gilbert of the article, "Buildings that kill: The earthquake danger lawmakers have ignored for decades."  

Deborah Wang speaks with Saru Jayaraman, author of "FORKED: A New Standard for American Dining," about why restaurant-goers should ask not only "Is the fish sustainably sourced?" but also "How much do you pay your dishwasher?" and "Why do you have an all-white wait staff?" Her book calls out restaurants who treat their workers poorly, and praises those who take what she calls the "high road" to profitability.

Courtesy of New York Times/Evan McGlinn

Bill Radke speaks with Kirk Johnson, Seattle bureau chief at The New York Times, about the families he met while reporting a story on Mary's Place Guest Rooms, a new shelter for homeless families in South Lake Union.

Housing in the Yesler Terrace area.
KUOW Photo/Dominic Black

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, managing editor of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about why developers like Paul Allen's Vulcan Real Estate are interested in developing Yesler Terrace, Seattle's oldest housing project, and how the Seattle Housing Authority is working to ensure current low-income tenants aren't displaced. The Puget Sound Business Journal recently featured the development.

Aji Piper (top row, middle) Adonis Piper (second row, right) and attorney Andrea Rodgers (top row, right) at King County Superior Court, outside the courtroom where they won their case.
Courtesy of Our Children's Trust

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Aji and Adonis Piper, two of eight youth plaintiffs in the case, Zoe and Stella Foster vs. Washington Department of Ecology, and  their attorney Andrea Rodgers.

The kids took the Department of Ecology to court over inaction on curbing carbon emissions in the state. 

Kahlil Joseph. Streetlight, 2014. Motion picture still.
Courtesy Frye Art Museum

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Jen Graves, visual arts writer for The Stranger, about the Frye Art Museum's current exhibition "Young Blood."

The show features the art of two local brothers, Kahlil Joseph and Noah Davis, who made big names for themselves in film and painting, respectively.

Courtesy of Terry Miles, Pacific Northwest Stories Network

Bill Radke speaks with Terry Miles, executive producer of the podcast Tanis, about chasing the myth of Tanis and why some think it may be hidden near the Puget Sound.

File photo: Discarded alcohol containers.
Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/9AhLkB

Bill Radke speaks with Lisa Daugaard, member of Seattle's Community Police Commission, about the civilian review board's recommendation that the city establish "wet parks" where chronic inebriates can legally drink in public.

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times Reporter Ángel González about Amazon's announcement that it will establish a temporary shelter for homeless families near their South Lake Union headquarters.

The online retail giant will partner with local homeless service provider Mary's Place to temporarily re-purpose an existing real estate holding — an empty Travelodge — while the land it sits on waits to be developed. The shelter will house around 60-70 homeless families for one year.

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