Posey Gruener | KUOW News and Information

Posey Gruener

Producer, Region of Boom

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Posey Gruener is a producer for KUOW's Region of Boom team. She sparks conversations about how the Puget Sound region is responding to its explosive growth, with a particular emphasis on the ways that housing policy affects segregation and inequality. You can hear her work on The Record, and on KUOW's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before joining KUOW, Posey worked at WNYC as a producer for The Takeaway, a live daily news program, and Studio 360, a weekly show about creativity, pop culture and the arts. She has also worked for The Moth, the live storytelling organization, and StoryCorps, the oral history radio project. Her freelance work has aired on Studio 360 and All Things Considered

Posey graduated Summa Cum Laude from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She holds a certificate in writing from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine, and a certificate in audio production from the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina.

Ways to Connect

State Representative John Lovick in his car. The former state trooper and Snohomish County Executive offered to drive a reporter around in the early morning to demonstrate a particular form of suffering felt by commuters North of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Bill Radke speaks with Carolyn Adolph about how — and why — she ended up stuck in traffic with state Representative John Lovick.

Housing construction in Marysville.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

In Cora Milholland's lifetime, Marysville has grown from under 2,000 residents to over 60,000.

Since the time he arrived in the 1990s, Loren Cook says the population has tripled.

Six new developments have sprung up on all sides of  Nichole Cleland since 2004, when she moved to a new development in Marysville. 

Bill Radke speaks with Port of Seattle spokesman Brian DeRoy about planned improvements to the walkway between Sound Transit's Airport Station and Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Among the improvements to the approximately quarter-mile walk: wind screens, heat lamps and golf carts.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Deb Wang speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the economic promises President-elect Trump made during the campaign and how local businesses like Boeing and Amazon might be affected by them.

Students hold up signs during a walkout to protest the election of Donald Trump as president, Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, in Seattle. A spokesman with Seattle Public Schools estimates that about 2,300 students from 14 middle and high schools participated.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke speaks with Quinn Angelou-Lysaker about how she helped organize students from eight Seattle high schools to walk out in protest of Donald Trump's election to the presidency.

Angelou-Lysaker discusses how she helped organize students on social media, how she's relating to Trump supporters at school and why some students are planning to send President-elect Trump a pile of bricks.

Bill Radke speaks with former King County Executive Ron Sims and former Washington State Attorney General Rob McKenna about how much the actions of President-elect Donald Trump could affect life in Washington State.

Bill Radke speaks with Harborview psychiatrist Doug Zatzick about what ordinary Americans can do to get through the final hours of the election; including whether or not it is OK to spend the rest of election day in a kiddie pool full of Jell-O shots.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Level of Confidence, 2015
Courtesy of the artist / Photo: Antimodular Research

Bill Radke speaks with Stranger art critic Jen Graves about the curious sense of techno-human kinship she felt while viewing Robots Building Robots

The multimedia art exhibition is at Seattle University's Hedreen Gallery until December 10th.

Monica Guzman / The Evergrey

Bill Radke speaks with local journalists Monica Guzman, co-founder of Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, and Reagan Jackson, writer at The Seattle Globalist and South Seattle Emerald, about #JournalismSoWhite.

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Microsoft and Apple's recent back-to-back hardware release events and why some tech watchers were surprised to discover they liked Microsoft's products better.

Bill Radke speaks with investigative journalist Stephanie Woodard about the shooting death of Renee Davis, a 23-year-old pregnant mother who was shot by King County Sheriff's Deputies during the course of a wellness check. Davis, who grew up on the Muckleshoot Reservation, had struggled with depression and was feeling suicidal.

Bill Radke talks with Northwest News Network reporter Anna King about what incumbent Governor Jay Inslee and Republican challenger Bill Bryant sparred over in the third and final debate.

Kathy Plonka - kathypl@spokesman.com / Tacoma News Tribune

Bill Radke speaks with Tacoma News Tribune columnist Matt Driscoll about the sad story of Tacoma kindergarten teacher Klara Bowman, who became infamous as 'Drunk Teacher.' 

Bill Radke speaks with Melanie McFarland, TV critic for Salon, about how MTV's Real World franchise has changed since 1997, the last time the cameras came to Seattle. Her report: things have not improved. Real World Seattle: Bad Blood premieres October 12.

Bill Radke speaks with Stranger art critic Jen Graves about "Streetwise Revisited: A 30 Year Journey," a series of exhibitions, screenings, and events at the Seattle Public Library's Central Branch that document the life of Erin Blackwell, known as Tiny.

The series, which documents three decades of Blackwell's life through photographs by Mary Ellen Mark and films by Martin Bell, is - as Graves says - "epic."

Bill Radke speaks with local independent podcast producer Marlo Mack about how she came to accept that the child she thought was her son was actually her daughter. Mack, who goes by a pseudonym to protect her child, has joined with KUOW to collaborate on a new season of How To Be A Girl, a podcast about raising a transgender daughter. 

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Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why the World Trade Organization is calling Airbus subsidies "unfair," and why it won't have much effect on Washington's Boeing employees.

Amazon.com
Flickr Photo/Soumit Nandi (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1VOQgCK

Bill Radke speaks with Julia Angwin, ProPublica reporter and author of the article "Amazon says it puts customers first. But its pricing algorithm doesn't."

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of the technology news site GeekWire, about why some business and political leaders are working to create an "emerging Cascadia innovation corridor," joining the tech centers in Vancouver and Seattle.

Bill Radke speaks with Mark Hallenbeck, director of the Washington State Transportation Center, about when and how self-driving cars might be a part of everyday life in the Puget Sound.

Canvas bags may have a worse effect on the environment than plastic ones.
Flickr Photo/Karin Beil (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5R6Qsb

Bill Radke speaks with Noah Dillon, author of a recent Atlantic article about the perils of owning (and not using) canvas grocery totes.

School supplies
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW education reporter Ann Dornfeld about why Washington asks its students to help supply their schools. 

Washington requires traditional supplies meant for individual use, like a 24-pack of crayons and some spiral bound notebooks, as well as more unusual supplies meant to be shared by the classroom, like one jumbo pack of napkins, two bottles of hand sanitizer and two reams of copy paper. 

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW economy reporter Carolyn Adolph about Joe Sutter, the Boeing engineer who led the development of the 747, the biggest airplane the world had ever seen.

The Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum called Sutter "the father of the 747," and gave him the 2013 Lifetime Achievement award.

Courtesy of Dean Wong

Bill Radke speaks with Stranger art critic Jen Graves about Seattle photographer Dean Wong, a community activist and chronicler of Chinatown life. Wong primarily takes photographs in Seattle, his hometown, but also frequently documents Chinatowns in Portland and in Vancouver, B.C.

Wong recently published a book of his photographs, titled "Seeing the Light: Four Decades in Chinatown." His pictures can also be seen at Jack Straw Cultural Center until September 2.

Scantron test sheet
Flickr Photo/COCOEN daily photos (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW education reporter Ann Dornfeld about the most recent Washington State report card.

Students who took the Smarter Balanced Assessment, a statewide test for public school students, did better on average this year. Still, approximately half of elementary school students are not meeting the standard in math, and they're not doing much better in English language arts.

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the economic pictures painted by incumbent Washington  Governor Jay Inslee and challenger Bill Bryant in their first gubernatorial debate.

Bill Radke speaks with Yakima Herald-Republic reporter Kate Prengaman about why tribes are living in substandard conditions at fishing sites along the Columbia river, and what the U.S. government is trying to do about it.

People cool off in Seattle Center's International Fountain.
Flickr Photo/David McSpadden (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/oZ93L4

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle DJ James Whetzel about his fifteen years as the mix master for Seattle Center's International Fountain, how he adjusts the music to the weather and what it's like underneath the fountain.

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with music journalist and Seattle native Ann Powers about Paul Allen's newest venture: a three-day music festival and industry conference called Upstream.

Festival organizers say they will "collide music, gaming, tech, media, design, and more to tackle today’s toughest industry challenges and open up opportunities within the new entertainment economy."

Wendy Boglioli won bronze in the Women's 100 metres Butterfly and gold in the Women's 4 × 100 metres Freestyle Relay at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Audio Pending...

Bill Radke speaks with swimmer Wendy Boglioli about facing off against the East German women's swimming team at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

The massively powerful East German swimmers, who were later found to have been systematically doped by their government, took gold after gold in event after event. The Americans were entirely shut out -- until the last race. 

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