Patricia Murphy | KUOW News and Information

Patricia Murphy

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2000

Patricia Murphy is a feature reporter for KUOW. Patricia is part of two collaborative projects focusing on military and veterans.  The American Homefront Project is a partnership between public radio stations KUOW, WUNC, KPCC and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Back at Base is a collaboration between National Public Radio and seven member stations including KUOW.  

Patricia is an award-winning radio journalist. Prior to covering veterans and military affairs she reported on social issues and criminal justice. Patricia’s first job in radio news was at WBUR Boston in 1994. She’s worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia’s series “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice.

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

Ways to Connect

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

A new program in Lacey, Wash., gives soldiers training and a career track in software development after discharge from the Army.

Flickr Photo/sea turtle

The Daybreak Star Cultural Center in Seattle’s Discovery Park is in financial trouble. Now the United Indians of All Tribes board is trying to raise enough money to stay open through the end of the year.

Flickr Photo/Charles Williams

For thousands of service members who use opiates to manage chronic pain from war injuries, the road to dependence and addiction can be paved with compassion.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

For prison’s toughest inmates, the hardest yoga position is simply closing their eyes.

That’s because these men, housed at Monroe Correctional Complex north of Seattle, have been in solitary confinement, unable to communicate with each other. Until recently, they spent 23 hours a day alone in a cell, without books, without TV, without anyone to talk to. 

Flickr Photo/Tom Collines

For federal employees, Tuesday is payday. But because of the partial government shutdown thousands of federal employees are getting a reduced paycheck.

KUOW Photo/Audrey Carlsen

Paychecks and research have come to a halt at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Seattle due to the partial government shutdown. Some NOAA researchers have been given special dispensation to come in to work only to feed the fish and invertebrates they study.

Morale at NOAA is pretty low for the skeleton crew that continues to come in to forecast the weather. So on Thursday they held a potluck to raise their spirits, serving up dishes with names like sequester quencher soda and filibuster parfait.

Flickr Photo/I-5 Design & Manufacture

Each year the Association of American Medical Colleges asks medical school graduates about their college experience. In 2013, 42 percent of graduates from all schools reported that they experienced mistreatment during med school. One of the most prevalent mistreatment behaviors was public embarrassment or humiliation.

Flickr Photo/Craig Elliott

The National Labor Relations Board and Space Needle management are in federal court this week.

The union that represents about 200 employees at the Needle is accusing management of union busting and unfair labor practices.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The city of Seattle has no basketball team yet, but the fight over a proposed arena continues.

The state Court of Appeals upheld a decision to dismiss a lawsuit by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union over the proposed site for a new basketball arena in SODO.

The longshoremen argued that an environmental review should have happened before the city made an agreement with arena investor Chris Hansen.

The appeals court ruled that the Memorandum of Understanding between the city of Seattle, King County and Hansen did not constitute final approval for the project. In essence, the court wrote that there was no action as of yet to challenge.  

The case before the high court involved Seattle doctor Louis Chen. Chen is accused of murdering his partner and their young son two years ago in their apartment on First Hill.

Attorneys for Chen had argued that their client’s mental competency review be kept secret under a state statute that limits who can see the information.

The high court disagreed.

Michelle Hubbard, a media law attorney at Allied Law Group, says in its ruling the court wrote that the constitutional presumption of openness trumps state law. “What this does is make clear that the same rules apply to court proceedings as to court records. Courts are open. Court records are open," Hubbard said. 

The high court, Hubbard said, was clear about why it’s important that the public have access to this type of information. Defendants who are deemed not competent could be committed for an indeterminate amount of time Hubbard said.

A King County Superior Court judge has ruled Chen competent to stand trial. He’s been charged with two counts of aggravated first degree murder. Prosecutors said they will not seek the death penalty.

The trial is expected to start this spring. If he’s found guilty, Chen faces life in prison without parole.

Courtesy Kosnoff/Fasy PLLC

A lawsuit filed Thursday in King County Superior Court alleges that the Boy Scouts of America continues to cover up a culture that ignored serial pedophiles in its ranks.

The Yakama Nation tribe and the US Justice Department have settled a lawsuit over access to tribal lands.

On February 15, 2011  federal agents raided a Yakama tribal cigarette manufacturer. The dispute over federal taxes in that case continues, but the raid prompted a lawsuit.

Phone calls made by inmates at Washington correctional institutions are expensive. That cost goes up if they’re calling out of state. A new ruling today  by the Federal Communications Commission will limit just how much an inmate will have to pay to connect with people on the outside.

The fight to lower inmate calling costs has gone on for more than a decade. 

Courtesy Lincoln Beauregard and Lee Rousso.

Attorneys for a man convicted of stealing a car in South Seattle two years ago have filed suit against the Seattle Police Department and one of its officers.

US Army

A solider from Joint Base Lewis-McChord will be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Spokane-born Staff Sgt. Ty Carter of  will be one of only a handful of living American soldiers to receive the nation’s highest military honor. The Army says US troops were far outnumbered that day in 2009 at Combat Outpost Keating in eastern Afghanistan. During the battle the Army says Carter killed enemy troops and risked his own life to save an injured soldier pinned down by a barrage of enemy fire.

Courtesy Sgt. Koetje

For soldiers who are injured or wounded, the process for determining whether they’re eligible for medical retirement is long.

Many, including the Government Accountability Office, say too long.

In a 2012 report to the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, the GAO found that soldiers at Washington’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord and other military installations were waiting nearly 400 days to get through the system.

Washington State Department of Corrections

An arbitrator has ordered the state Department of Corrections to reinstate three staff members who were fired after Officer Jayme Biendl was murdered at Monroe Correctional Complex two years ago.

Biendl was strangled inside the prison's chapel by inmate Byron Sherf, who was serving time for rape.

After the investigation, three corrections officers were fired. One was demoted. The DOC accused them of misconduct, dereliction of duty and intentionally misleading investigators.

The union filed a grievance on their behalf.

Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Correction 7/8/2013: A previous version of this story contained an error. Furloughs begin Monday, July 8, not Friday, July 12.

Beginning Monday, more than 2,600 civilian employees at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma will begin mandatory one-day-a-week furloughs.

The furloughs are a result of the federal spending cuts known as sequestration.

Washington's Supreme Court justices will decide if King County prosecutors can seek the death penalty against Christopher Monfort.

Monfort is accused in the shooting death of Seattle Police Officer Tim Brenton on Halloween night four years ago. One other officer was wounded that night.

Flickr Photo/The U.S. Army

The Army says Joint Base Lewis-McChord's 4th Stryker Brigade will be one of 10 combat teams deactivated nationwide. The move is just one part of the Army’s plan to reduce its forces as the war in Afghanistan winds down.

The brigade has about 4,000 soldiers. Nearly 350 of them returned home Sunday after a seven-month deployment to Afghanistan. Overall, the Army plans to reduce the force by 80,000 soldiers by 2017.

Courtesy of the Husky United Military Veterans Facebook page.

Sam Talkington is cramming. It’s finals week at the University of Washington and he’s got an economics exam soon.

Talkington is majoring in finance at the Foster School of Business and he’s been feeling the crunch. “I have an extremely heavy course load right now,” he said. “I’m taking four courses and some stuff I’m not familiar with but becoming more familiar with as the days progress.”

High Desert Warrior

Correction 6/6/2013: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Staff Sgt. Bales was from Lake Tapps, Ohio.

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, the American soldier from Lake Tapps, Wash., charged with killing 16 Afghan civilians during night time raids on two villages last year, pleaded guilty Wednesday to avoid the death penalty. The judge, Col. Jeffery Nance has accepted his plea agreement which takes the option of the  death penalty off the table.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Seattle’s Café Racer is closed today in remembrance. 

It's been a year since a gunman shot five people inside the eclectic coffee shop and bar. Drew Keriakedes, Joe Albanese , Kimberly Layfield, and Don Largen were killed. The cafe's cook, Leonard Meuse, was the lone survivor.

After the gunman fled the scene, police say he made his way downtown where he  killed  Gloria Leonidas and stole her car before shooting himself in West Seattle. 

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

During an emergency, first responders are trained to work quickly to save lives. They’re deliberate and methodical.

People in emotional distress after a fire or accident need someone with different training. For them an emergency department may send a chaplain. The Police and Fire Chaplain's Training Academy in Seattle just graduated a new crop of chaplains for emergency departments around the country.

A Pierce County Superior Court judge said Monday that temporarily boarding the mentally ill in hospital emergency rooms without treatment violates state and federal law. County and state attorneys have asked for the ruling to be put on hold while they appeal.

Flickr Photo/Greg Matthews

Correction: The broadcast version of this story states that the Fourth Amendment protects against illegal search and seizure, when in fact it protects against unreasonable search and seizure. 

Washington’s lawmakers are debating new penalties for driving under the influence during a special legislative session beginning Monday.

Photo courtesy of David Ossorio

After 20 years in the business, Lenny Padayao has seen it many times: Alcoholics gaming the system to avoid addressing their disease. “The alcoholic, they’ll do everything they’re required to do by cheating,” he says. “You have to keen in on these guys, because if you don’t you’ll never catch them.” 

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Washington state lawmakers are poised to impose tougher laws against drivers caught driving drunk. They were moved to action following two fatal crashes involving drivers with previous DUIs.

Last month a SWAT team from Bellevue arrived around 5:00 a.m. in a Columbia City neighborhood to serve a warrant for a suspect. As the dramatic scene unfolded the suspect, Russell Smith, was shot and killed by three Bellevue police officers. Now neighbors want answers about what happened.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

On March 22, 2013,  around  5:00 a.m., a SWAT team from the Bellevue Police Department showed up at a tiny dead-end street in Seattle's Columbia City neighborhood. They were there to arrest a suspect on a warrant for robbery.

Things did not go smoothly.

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