Patricia Murphy | KUOW News and Information

Patricia Murphy

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2000

Patricia Murphy is a feature reporter for KUOW. Patricia is part of two collaborative projects focusing on military and veterans.  The American Homefront Project is a partnership between public radio stations KUOW, WUNC, KPCC and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Back at Base is a collaboration between National Public Radio and seven member stations including KUOW.  

Patricia is an award-winning radio journalist. Prior to covering veterans and military affairs she reported on social issues and criminal justice. Patricia’s first job in radio news was at WBUR Boston in 1994. She’s worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia’s series “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice.

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

Ways to Connect

Maj. Dr. Eric Jacobson checks the temperature of a soldier in the controlled monitoring area of Joint Base Lewis-McChord on the morning of Jan. 13, 2015. It was day 13 of the 21 day Ebola monitoring period for the cohort that returned from Liberia.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The 100 soldiers from Fort Carson’s 615th Engineer Company have their temperature recorded twice a day. They’ve been lining up for these temperature checks for more than two weeks now. They’ve gotten so good at it, the whole battalion can get through the line in 20 minutes.

The ferry pulls in to Friday Harbor, the only incorporated city in San Juan County, Wash. Veterans will often travel the hour-long ferry ride to reach VA services here.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This story is part of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 1 / Part 2).

For veterans in San Juan County, getting health care from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs almost always begins with an hour-long ferry ride.

Officer Andy Gould of Auburn, Washington. Gould, a veteran, says his military experience sometimes helps him establish rapport with other veterans
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The computer screen in Officer Andy Gould’s patrol car rhythmically ticks off details of emergencies from dispatch.

Gould, a 25-year veteran of the Auburn Police Department, wraps up a burglary and gets called to a suspicious subject nearby. A 13-year-old has threatened to kill two people in the house with a baseball bat.

As Gould drives, text from the dispatchers scrolls up the screen. It tells him where to go for his next call, what the problem is — and whether the people involved have ever been in the military.

Sixteen people being monitored at Joint Base Lewis-McChord for the Ebola virus have been cleared by medical personnel.  

The 15 service members and one civilian returned last month from a mission to Liberia in support of Operation United Assistance. 

The group celebrated Thanksgiving in isolation during their 21 days of controlled monitoring.  They were checked twice daily for signs of the virus by Army medical personnel.

A federal audit of a 24-hour national hotline for homeless veterans found that callers didn’t always receive assistance or access to needed services.

The Office of the Inspector General said lapses in management and oversight at the call center led to more than 40,000 missed opportunities to help.

About 200 people marching through downtown Seattle disrupted black Friday holiday shopping and the city’s traditional Christmas tree lighting ceremony.

They marched in the rain, blocking intersections and streets, in protest of a Missouri grand jury’s decision this week to not indict a police officer who fatally shot a black teenager.

The protesters flooded into Westlake shopping center, taking over escalators and lying down on the floor. Seattle police ultimately turned shoppers away.

A map shows where the Navy war training area could be located.
USDA Forest Service

The public has until the end of the week to weigh in on the Navy’s plan to create an electromagnetic warfare range.

The Pacific Northwest Electronic Warfare Range requires permits from the National Forest Service and the State Department of Natural Resources.

An Army sergeant who faced two counts of premeditated murder announced via Twitter he will plead guilty to a lesser charge at Joint Base Lewis-McChord Thursday.

Sergeant 1st class Michael Barbera says he will plead guilty to communicating a threat.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle is one of five bases nationwide that will keep troops returning from West Africa in a controlled monitoring environment for 21 days after they return.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The city of Auburn  hosted its 49th annual Veterans Day parade last Saturday. The event has grown significantly over the years. This year’s parade was a tribute to The Military Order of The Purple Heart. With 200 entries the parade stretched for more than a mile. Reporter Patricia Murphy was on scene to capture this audio postcard from the event. 

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The King County Sheriff’s Department is investigating after a bottle exploded in a Redmond elementary school parking lot, injuring two bus drivers.

The 2-liter plastic bottle exploded just after 7:30 this morning at Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

No students were injured in the blast, which occurred more than an hour before classes began.

Bomb deputies from the King County Sheriff's Department said it was an acid bomb and that it was not a sophisticated device.

(Stephen Brashear/AP Images for U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation

Thousands of veterans and service members preparing to leave the military are expected at Joint Base Lewis-McChord this week for a three-day summit.

Amy Czerwinski

Prison is no place to be vulnerable. For inmates with intellectual disabilities, autism or traumatic brain injury, it can be dangerous.

Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Fleet (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  The U.S. Forest Service and the Navy is addressing public concerns about a controversial training exercise.

The Navy wants to place electromagnetic radiation emitters at more than a dozen sites on federal and state land in Washington. The real time training would allow pilots to practice finding those signals. 

Flickr Photo/Steve Johnson (CC BY 2.0)

There’s E. coli in the water again on Mercer Island. The island's 62 restaurants  have been ordered to close and people are being told to boil their water for the second time in a week. Schools say they’ll remain open.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

FBI Director James Comey stood flanked by state and local law enforcement while speaking with the media at the bureau’s downtown office yesterday.

It was nearing the end of his workday, and nearing the end of a U.S. field office tour (we’re number 47 of 56 stops) since he took the job just over a year ago.

Return to Oso
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Gary Ray was the pastor at the Oso chapel in March. While doing work for the church on the morning of Saturday, March 22,  he received a call from another pastor in Darrington. There had been a massive landslide and he should come back, the pastor said. After the slide, Ray provided spiritual and emotional support for a community that prided itself on its strong sense of independence.

More than a hundred veterans turned out for a town hall style meeting hosted by Veterans Administration Puget Sound as an effort to improve care at regional hospitals.

Flickr Photo/Piskami (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State records reveal that in the past two years, four law enforcement departments in Washington state have been suspended from the military surplus program known as 1033.

The government program issues surplus military gear to state and local municipalities who show a need. Under the program, law enforcement agencies can apply to receive everything from Shop-Vacs to mine-resistant vehicles. All they need to pay is the cost of shipping.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

In the last few years, Washington state has received shipments of mine resistant vehicles that were used in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

They’re pricey (about $650,000), and they’re tough to drive, but 17 police agencies have one to call their own. Each one weighs about 50,000 pounds.

Patricia Murphy

Sloan Gibson, the deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs, was in Seattle on Thursday as part of a national tour listening to employees at facilities run by his agency.

Courtesy of Gregory Bean

About 15 years ago, the Bellevue Police Department decided it needed an artist to sketch suspects.

A lieutenant stopped by Detective Greg Bean’s desk with a flyer that promised, “No experience necessary.”

“He throws it on my desk and says, ‘You’re going to art school,’” Bean said.

Washington Congressman Denny Heck said the Department of Health and Human Services is no longer seeking facilities for temporary shelters for refugee children at Washington’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Heck, who represents the 10th Congressional District which includes JBLM, said he trusts the department to make the right decisions about what facilities are best for the refugee children, but adds that he will continue to push for what he calls common sense, comprehensive immigration reform.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

When Seattle Police Department officials dug into the data from its first report about marijuana enforcement they found that 80 percent of tickets were issued by one officer.

One apparently very frustrated officer.

In one citation, the officer refers to Washington state's legal pot law as “silly.” He also added at the bottom of the citations, "Attn: Petey Holmes," a snarky reference to Seattle's city attorney, Pete Holmes.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Startup companies from the University of Washington showed off their innovative products to potential investors and industry advisors Tuesday.

The UW launched a record 18 startups last fiscal year with the support from the UW Center for Commercialization.

Patricia Murphy

A Level 3 sex offender charged with kidnapping a child returns to court this week. Prosecutors say Jesse Brisbin snatched a 6-year-old girl from a park in Beacon Hill and assaulted her.

Brisbin, who has pleaded not guilty, has been supervised by the Department of Corrections since 2011. His arrest highlights how difficult it can be to manage the state's highest risk sex offenders who have been released from prison.

Associated Press Photo/Elaine Thompson

Poor planning and distracted driving were two reasons for the collapse of the Interstate 5 bridge over the Skagit River, federal officials said Tuesday.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

It was a false countdown to high noon, when Cannabis City, a store in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood, was supposed to start selling marijuana.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Twenty-three years ago, acting Captain Steve Strand was patrolling Columbia City on a mountain bike, busting alleyway crack dealers. The officers under his charge are still patrolling on mountain bikes, but the neighborhood landscape has changed.

Courtesy of Federal Public Defenders office.

Every sentencing comes down to two things according to attorney Michael Filipovic: Why did this person commit this crime, and why is he not going to do it again?

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