Patricia Murphy

Reporter

Patricia Murphy is an award-winning reporter at KUOW Public Radio in Seattle focusing on military affairs, veterans' issues and criminal justice. She began her career at WBUR Boston in 1994 and has worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia's most recent series, “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice. In a briefing document accidentally sent to her by an Army public affairs officer, Patricia was described as “a professional, no-nonsense reporter who comes to the table fully prepared,” though her colleagues at KUOW might also describe her as the station cut-up.

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

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Flickr Photo/Piskami (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State records reveal that in the past two years, four law enforcement departments in Washington state have been suspended from the military surplus program known as 1033.

The government program issues surplus military gear to state and local municipalities who show a need. Under the program, law enforcement agencies can apply to receive everything from Shop-Vacs to mine-resistant vehicles. All they need to pay is the cost of shipping.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

In the last few years, Washington state has received shipments of mine resistant vehicles that were used in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

They’re pricey (about $650,000), and they’re tough to drive, but 17 police agencies have one to call their own. Each one weighs about 50,000 pounds.

Patricia Murphy

Sloan Gibson, the deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs, was in Seattle on Thursday as part of a national tour listening to employees at facilities run by his agency.

Courtesy of Gregory Bean

About 15 years ago, the Bellevue Police Department decided it needed an artist to sketch suspects.

A lieutenant stopped by Detective Greg Bean’s desk with a flyer that promised, “No experience necessary.”

“He throws it on my desk and says, ‘You’re going to art school,’” Bean said.

Washington Congressman Denny Heck said the Department of Health and Human Services is no longer seeking facilities for temporary shelters for refugee children at Washington’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Heck, who represents the 10th Congressional District which includes JBLM, said he trusts the department to make the right decisions about what facilities are best for the refugee children, but adds that he will continue to push for what he calls common sense, comprehensive immigration reform.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

When Seattle Police Department officials dug into the data from its first report about marijuana enforcement they found that 80 percent of tickets were issued by one officer.

One apparently very frustrated officer.

In one citation, the officer refers to Washington state's legal pot law as “silly.” He also added at the bottom of the citations, "Attn: Petey Holmes," a snarky reference to Seattle's city attorney, Pete Holmes.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Startup companies from the University of Washington showed off their innovative products to potential investors and industry advisors Tuesday.

The UW launched a record 18 startups last fiscal year with the support from the UW Center for Commercialization.

Patricia Murphy

A Level 3 sex offender charged with kidnapping a child returns to court this week. Prosecutors say Jesse Brisbin snatched a 6-year-old girl from a park in Beacon Hill and assaulted her.

Brisbin, who has pleaded not guilty, has been supervised by the Department of Corrections since 2011. His arrest highlights how difficult it can be to manage the state's highest risk sex offenders who have been released from prison.

Associated Press Photo/Elaine Thompson

Poor planning and distracted driving were two reasons for the collapse of the Interstate 5 bridge over the Skagit River, federal officials said Tuesday.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

It was a false countdown to high noon, when Cannabis City, a store in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood, was supposed to start selling marijuana.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Twenty-three years ago, acting Captain Steve Strand was patrolling Columbia City on a mountain bike, busting alleyway crack dealers. The officers under his charge are still patrolling on mountain bikes, but the neighborhood landscape has changed.

Courtesy of Federal Public Defenders office.

Every sentencing comes down to two things according to attorney Michael Filipovic: Why did this person commit this crime, and why is he not going to do it again?

A veteran King County Sheriff’s deputy is behind bars after an investigation found that he had pimped his wife, stolen equipment from the county gun range and pedaled steroids.

Patricia Murphy

It’s been a week since a gunman open fire on the Seattle Pacific University campus killing one student and injuring two others.

The mood was different Friday as students and loved ones celebrated the university’s annual Ivy Cutting. The ceremony, a tradition since 1922, represents the cutting of students' ties to the university and the independence following graduation.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

On Thursday afternoon, Daniel Martin received the text that every university president dreads: His campus was on lockdown. There was a gunman.

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