Patricia Murphy


Year started with KUOW: 2000

Patricia Murphy is a feature reporter for KUOW. Patricia is part of two collaborative projects focusing on military and veterans.  The American Homefront Project is a partnership between public radio stations KUOW, WUNC, KPCC and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Back at Base is a collaboration between National Public Radio and seven member stations including KUOW.  

Patricia is an award-winning radio journalist. Prior to covering veterans and military affairs she reported on social issues and criminal justice. Patricia’s first job in radio news was at WBUR Boston in 1994. She’s worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia’s series “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice.

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

Ways To Connect

Department of Veterans Affairs
Department of Veterans Affairs

U.S. Sen. Patty Murray is calling for disciplinary action after a Veterans Affairs investigation found that staffers in Seattle dumped mail about vets’ benefits in a yellow bucket and left it for months. 

File photo of Joint Base Lewis-McChord headquarters.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Outrage is growing over the potential discharge of a Special Forces soldier from Joint Base Lewis McCord who beat an Afghan police commander accused of raping a young boy.

The practice of bacha bazi – an Afghan term for powerful men using adolescent boys for sex – and just what American troops have or haven’t done about it is getting renewed attention now, but the debate isn't new.

File photo of Bowe Bergdahl at his graduation from basic training with the Army.
Bergdahl family

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl faces a hearing Thursday to determine whether he’ll be court-martialed on a desertion charge.

Olympic College in Bremerton will receive money that will help to pay for a veteran center for students.
Olympic College

Lake Washington Institute of Technology in Kirkland and Olympic College in Bremerton will get a little more than $100,000 for the next three years to help student veterans.

The grants from the Department of Education will help create centers for student veterans. 

Henry Chamberlain looks at mementos from World War II. He spent three and a half years as a prisoner of the Japanese.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

In 1945 President Harry Truman declared Sept. 2 as Victory Over Japan Day. Japan surrendered aboard the USS Missouri. It was the official end of World War II.

But the suffering wasn't over for Henry Chamberlain, who had been captured on the Philippines' Bataan Peninsula more than three years before.

Color Guard: Michael Jefferies (front), James Bell, Randy Roth, Chadwick Kallebaugh, Andrew Wood (closest to camera).Stafford Creek Corrections Center in Aberdeen, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Every morning the flags at Stafford Creek Corrections Center in Aberdeen, Washington, are raised in a color guard ceremony.

The 10 men who do the job are inmates and veterans. 

EA-18G Growlers from Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 taxi to the runway as they prepare to to depart Naval Air Facility Misawa for their home base of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Fleet (CC BY NC 2.0)

A federal judge has denied an injunction request from a Whidbey Island group that would have prevented Navy jets from landing at a strip near Coupeville, Washington.

The group says the noise from EA-18 Growler jet training flights is harmful.

In the spring they asked a federal judge to stop the landings until the Navy completes a new environmental assessment, which is due next year.

Army Captain Kellam Carmody discusses a recruit's aptitiude test with Army recruiter Kevin Mitchell at the Army Career Center in Tukwila, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The first thing a new recruit will encounter at the Army Career Center in Tukwila, Washington, is a locked door.

It’s one of the changes at recruiting stations since the shootings earlier this month at a military facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Madeline Warrington ultimately found a job as a car saleswoman after leaving the military. It wasn't what she envisioned after eight years in the Army.
Courtesy of Madeline Warrington

In the Army you don’t get a job, you get an MOS – a military occupational specialty.

Sergeant Madeline Warrington was a 35M human intelligence collector. That meant that while she was in Iraq and Afghanistan, she gathered information on possible enemy threats.

Soldiers prepare for static-line jumps from Blackhawk helicopters at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in this photo dated June 17, 2015.
Flickr Photo/JBLM PAO (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Washington's Joint Base Lewis McChord will lose more than a thousand soldiers under a restructuring plan announced Thursday by the Defense Department. Local leaders say it could have been much worse.

Women in the Army and enlisted soldiers were more likely to attempt suicide, a study found.
Flickr photo/The U.S. Army (CC BY 2.0)

Women in the Army during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were more likely to attempt suicide than male soldiers, a new study has found. 

Washington Warrior Widows Founder Stephanie Groepper, left, stopped for a break alongside friend Amber Martini and new member Danielle Williams during a hike to Mima Mounds Natural Preserve.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

War widows can be seen as a living symbol of patriotism. A reminder of the ultimate sacrifice of service.

But practically speaking, life for military widows and widowers is awash in grief, uncertainty and paperwork.

A group run by widows in Washington state has created a supportive social network to ease that burden. 

Former Navy linguist Linsdsay Church holds military ID tags for her grandfather, mother and her.  The two later tags contain social security numbers. Her grandfather's  tags pre-date the miltary's use of SSN for IDs.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

A massive data breach at the federal Office of Personnel Management has exposed the Social Security numbers and personnel records of nearly every federal worker. The implications for federal employees, military service members and the intelligence community could be extraordinary.  

But at a very basic level U.S. service members have been at high risk for identity theft for decades.

A photomicrograph of Bacillus anthracis bacteria using Gram-stain technique.

The list of locations with labs that may have mistakenly been sent potentially live anthrax samples keeps growing.

Last week the Pentagon announced that labs in California, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin received the samples. The Pentagon has now added labs in Washington state and Canada to the list. 

Col. Kenneth Trzepkowski, chief of palliative care at Madigan Army Medical Center, unfolds one of the handmade quilts donated to the hospital for the palliative care patients.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Caring for the nation's veterans at the end of their lives can be a complex task. Service members — especially combat veterans — can struggle with guilt, abandonment and regret.

The Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs are working to help them. At one Army hospital in Tacoma, its mission is to make those last days meaningful.