Matt Martin | KUOW News and Information

Matt Martin

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Meredith Heuer

Bill Radke speaks with Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, and his wife Lisa Brown about their new book, "Goldfish Ghost." Handler wrote the story and Brown did the illustrations. And as you might guess from the title, it's a kid's story about a dead goldfish. Handler and Brown discuss the new book, why we don't really want happy endings, and the need for loneliness and bewilderment in our daily lives. 

FLICKR PHOTO/hackNY.org (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bHLu96

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Mike Carter about the case of Roman Seleznev. Seleznev's story reads like spy fiction. He is the illegitimate son of a prominent Russian politician and Putin ally. He grew up in poverty, with an alcoholic mother who died when he was a teenager. Without a mother and abandoned by his powerful father, 17-year-old Seleznev ended up living on the streets.

Seleznev went on to steal and sell hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of credit card numbers, many from businesses here in Washington state. U.S. authorities pursued Seleznev around the globe and finally, they arrested him and brought him to Washington for trial.

He was just convicted and sentenced to 27 years in prison.

FLICKR PHOTO/Chip Griffin(CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xNLFK

Bill Radke speaks with Bremerton Police Chief Steven Strachan about a controversial crossword puzzle published in the New York Times.

San Juan Islands National Monument
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with the New York Times Seattle bureau chief Kirk Johnson about the latest executive order from President Donald Trump to review national monuments created in the past 20 years. There are two of those monuments here in Washington: the San Juan Islands National Monument and the Hanford Reach National Monument. 

Football
Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ok5MYl

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times education reporter Claudia Rowe about an investigation into improper recruitment practices by the Garfield High School football team. Rowe reports on two teens from Texas who were brought up to play football for Garfield but given little support and sent back to Texas after the football season was over. 

Photo Credit: Brady Harvey/Museum of Pop Culture

Bill Radke speaks with NPR music writer Ann Powers about the current state of protest music. Powers is moderating a panel discussing politics and music at The Pop Conference 2017 happening at MoPop this weekend. Also joining the conversation is local poet, songwriter and singer for the band The Flavr Blue, Hollis Wong Wear. 

Dan Charles

Jeannie Yandel speaks with NPR food reporter Dan Charles about a new apple variety coming to Washington state known as the Cosmic Crisp. Washington grows 70 percent of the apples in the United States, and Red Delicious is the largest single variety grow in the state.

But Americans don't really buy Red Delicious apples anymore. Only half of the 2016 crop has been sold. And the majority of those have gone overseas. Most American shoppers like other varieties - the Honeycrisp, the Gala, the Pink Lady. So apple growers are changing things up. They're hoping Cosmic Crisp will be a big hit among apple lovers. 

Seahawks CenturyLink Field Dec. 28, 2014 vs. Rams
Flickr Photo/Aime Ayers (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1W8Jbif

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle Times' sports enterprise and investigative reporter Geoff Baker about his story on former Seahawks offensive tackle Jerry Wunsch.

The Seahawks had players use a combination of opioids and other drugs to deal with pain on and off the field. Wunsch now deals with joint pain, stomach problems and memory loss. He recently won a workers' compensation claim against the Seahawks and he is part of a class action lawsuit against the NFL.

Brothers Galen and Arthur Emery at KUOW.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

What should you do if a loved one is contemplating killing themselves? It’s a scary thought — and one most people aren’t prepared to answer.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle Times reporter Claudia Rowe about her new book, "The Spider and the Fly." 

Before Seattle Times reporter Claudia Rowe moved here, she was living in Poughkeepsie, New York where  in 1996 women started to disappear. These women had worked as prostitutes, and they had all all reported a man named Kendall Francois to the police for sexual assault, beating, choking. 

In this Nov. 20, 2008, file photo, the execution chamber at the Washington State Penitentiary is shown with the witness gallery behind glass at right, in Walla Walla, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with State Senator Steve O'Ban and Seattle attorney Jason Rittereiser about the proposal by the attorney general's office to abolish the death penalty in Washington State. 

A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

“It is very likely by the end of Mr. Trump's first term, the North Koreans will be able to reach Seattle.” —Michael Hayden, former head of the CIA and NSA.

President-elect Donald Trump tweeted that would never happen.

Newspaper box for the Seattle Times, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Mr.TinDC (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://bit.ly/2gKCGU9

“It’s not at all surprising.”

That was the reaction by David Boardman to the announcement by the Seattle Times that it will be reducing staff. The newspaper told staff in an email that it will be offering buyouts with the potential of layoffs after that.

Brevet Major General George Armstrong Custer, United States Army, 1865
Public Domain

Bill Radke speaks with T.J. Stiles about his book, "Custer's Trial: A Life on the Frontier of a New America." Stiles draws parallels between a changing America during the time of Custer and changes happening in our country today. Stiles book won the 2016 Pulizter Prize for history.   

Brandi Carlile among the music collection at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

"I am really upset with Trump voters right now," local legend Brandi Carlile told KUOW’s Bill Radke. "I’m a little concerned as to why they are [Trump supporters], but I am listening."

Mark Frost is the co-creator of 'Twin Peaks' filmed in North Bend, Washington.
Courtesy photos

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Mark Frost, co-creator of the 90s television show Twin Peaks, about his new book "The Secret History of Twin Peaks" and the upcoming revival of the show on Showtime next year. Frost will be holding an event at the Elliot Bay Book Company on October 29.

Kurt B. Reighley and Mark Mitchell together at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Mark Mitchell and his partner Kurt B. Reighley about why they decided to move to Tucson after living in Seattle for 30 years.  Mitchell is a costume designer and artist, Reighley is DJ El Toro on KEXP.

Mount Rainier National Park.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Bruce Barcott about the character of Mount Rainier and the place it takes in the lives of people who live around Puget Sound. Barcott is the author of "Measure of a Mountain: Beauty and Terror on Mount Rainier." 

KUOW has profiled all three of the national parks in Washington to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. You can also hear our conversations about Olympic National Park and North Cascades National Park

Kate Riley's son has autism and has trouble with responding quickly to directions, a concern when dealing with police.
Courtesy of Kate Riley

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Riley, Seattle Times editorial page editor, about her recent article that explains why she worries about interactions between her autistic son and law enforcement. 

Washington delegate Hossein Khorram is a supporter of Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Hossein Khorram about why he continues to support Donald Trump, despite other Republicans in the region backing out of a Trump fundraiser planned for the Seattle area later this month. 

Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e2A4sb

Bill Radke speaks with Jourdan Keith, founder and director of Urban Wilderness Works, about why she leads young people of color on 17-day camping trips in the North Cascades National Park.   

Bill Radke shows off the emergency kits we have for everyone at KUOW (but that's not enough to last us in a major catastrophe).
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Tom Martin, founding member of the American Preppers Network, about why he has an emergency supply of food and water. Martin also talks about why people need to be prepared for any natural disaster. 

Flickr Photo/Matthew (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Michael Schutzler, head of the Washington Technology Industry Association,  about his efforts to get tech companies in Seattle more involved in the fight against sex trafficking.  

Seattle Food Rescue founder Tim Jenkins picks up food from Stock Box on James St.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Up to 40 percent of food in the U.S. ends up in landfills. Seattle has been trying to tackle the issue with laws that require composting. But that's not enough for one local cyclist.

Tim Jenkins cuts sharply across tracks in the road as he jets through an intersection before the light changes. He has a child trailer attached to the back of his bike. But instead of carrying a small human, Jenkins hopes to fill the cart with food.

A scene from 'Ready, Jet, Go!'
YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Washington native Craig Bartlett about how his childhood around Puget Sound influenced the creation of his new PBS Kids show, Ready, Jet, Go!

File photo of the Sodo area of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/camknows (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/cyojwG

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times sports reporter Geoff Baker about the debate over whether or not the city should give part of Occidental Ave in Sodo to Chris Hansen to build a new NBA and NHL stadium.

Bill Radke speaks with Almarina Herrera-Quintero and Dae Shik Kim-Hawkins about an online petition by students of color at Seattle Pacific University. They're asking for the creation of a diversity office on campus and for the university to hire more diverse faculty. Bill Radke also talks with SPU President Dan Martin about how he is responding to the petition.

Spawning salmon
US Bureau of Land Management

Bill Radke speaks with Joel Baker, science director of the Center for Urban Waters at the University of Washington Tacoma, about a recent study that shows a laundry list of ​pharmaceutical drugs are showing up in fish in Puget Sound. 

Ranj Abudlsamad in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Ranj Abdulsamad about coming to Seattle as a refugee in 2012 and how he now helps other refugees adjust to live in America. 

Flickr Photo/Blake Burkhart (Cc-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1WmamK7

Ross Reynolds speaks with David Hall, Everett's deputy city prosecutor, about the city's controversial ordinance that treats "aggressive panhandling" as a misdemeanor punishable with jail time. 

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