Marcie Sillman | KUOW News and Information

Marcie Sillman

Arts and Culture Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focused on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region. After two years as Senior Host of the program, Marcie returned to full-time cultural reporting.

Ways to Connect

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Political junkies may remember the 2012 Democratic Party Convention keynote speech given by San Antonio mayor Julian Castro. Many observers speculate that Castro and his twin brother Joaquin Catro, a Texas Congressman, will be part of the vanguard that leads Democrats back to power in the Lone Star State. Mayor Castro talks Texas and D.C. politics with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

Courtesy of the mayoral campaigns

The 2013 Seattle mayoral race has been rife with finger pointing, questions about leadership style and the source of campaign contributions. For the average voter, the debate may not include enough substantive conversation about the meat and potato issues that face Seattle citizens: How do we pay to fix our roadways? Where do we funnel new density? Are we as safe as possible in our homes and in public venues?

Flickr Photo/Goodiez (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Liquor Control Board, Department of Health and the Department of Revenue have released their recommendations for how the state should regulate medical marijuana. They’ve set guidelines for age limits, possession amounts, location of retail stores and taxation. Austin Jenkins, Olympia Correspondent for the Public Radio Northwest News Network, explains how these regulations will affect medical marijuana stores and how they differ from the regulation of recreational marijuana.

As part of implementing the Affordable Care Act, state and federal health exchanges kicked off three weeks ago. The launch has been no walk in the park. State-run exchanges and the federally-run, Healthcare.gov, have been plagued with website problems: failed-log ins, long wait times and, in the case of Washington’s own wahealthplanfinder.org, a non-functioning website for the first few days.

Despite its glitchy start, Washington has been touted as one of the best functioning state marketplaces. Marcie Sillman talks with spokesperson Michael Marchand from Washington’s Health Benefit Exchange.

Douglas T. Kenrick and Vladas Griskevicius' book "The Rational Animal."

The classic observer of human behavior would tell you all of our decisions have a rational basis. But new research indicates that “rational” may not be based on any conscious factors, but instead, is more deeply hardwired in our DNA. Vladas Griskevicius is co author of a new book called “The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think.” He talks with Marcie Sillman.

Flickr Photo/Crash Zone Photography

Pierce Murphy is the new civilian director for Seattle Police Department's Office of Professional Accountability. Both SPD and OPA have been under tight scrutiny since a Department of Justice's 2011 investigation found evidence of biased policing and unlawful use of force. Murphy says his first task is restoring credibility for the OPA. Marcie Sillman talks with Murphy.

AP Photo/Wally Fong

They called him the Dawgfather.

Don James, the beloved, longtime University of Washington football coach died on Sunday. He was 80. The university said James died at home of complications with pancreatic cancer.

The Record's News Quiz

Oct 18, 2013

It's Friday and that means it's time for The Record's News Quiz, one of public radio's most popular news quizzes. One lucky contestant will show their news knowledge and if they prevail their photo will grace KUOW's Facebook page. Marcie Sillman hosts.

Flickr Photo/FreedomHouse

A Syrian deputy prime minister has said this week that peace talks between the Syrian government and opposition forces could begin next month in Geneva. The United States and Russia have not yet set a date for the talks however, and a spokesman for UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon could not confirm the dates reported in Syrian state media.

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen

The partial government shutdown is over and the US avoided debt default this week, but the hard work is just beginning.

Members of both parties are eager to avoid another shutdown, but skepticism remains as to whether or not they can come together to strike a deal. Sen. Patty Murray and Rep. Paul Ryan are bringing to the table the budget "wish lists" of both their parties with the hopes that they will be able to find a middle ground plan that will pass the House and Senate.

POLITICO congressional reporter Ginger Gibson explains the what the two parties need to create a long term budget plan.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

When Dave Isay first launched the StoryCorps project – an independent archive of interviews between two people – nobody wanted to participate. StoryCorps staff at Grand Central Station would have to grab commuters and convince them to come into the tiny recording booth to share their stories.

Interfaith Amigos
Flickr Photo/University of Denver

Given all the chaos in Washington ,D.C., we got to thinking about how political compromise comes about.  One factor may be the ability to put yourself in your antagonist’s shoes. In other words, to have a little compassion. In the Merriam-Webster dictionary the word compassion is defined as “sympathetic consciousness of others distress together with a desire to alleviate that distress.”

The Interfaith Amigos often think about compassion. They’re regular guests on KUOW and we invited Imam Jamal Rahman, Rabbi Ted Falcon and Pastor Don Mackenzie to talk about how you act on compassion and what the differences are between compassion and empathy.

Flickr Photo/SEIU Health Care 775NW

There are more than whispers of a deal to end the shutdown today. Both the Senate and the House are working on proposals. Whether or not they will pass, however, is another question. Marcie Sillman talks with Representative Jim McDermott, D-Wash., about the politics inside Congress.

KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman and Marty Wingate courtesy photo.

Seattle gardener Marty Wingate loves the Pacific Coast iris: it's a native plant, so it doesn't require summer watering, it has a nice grassy look and it thrives in partial shade.

We may be living longer, but we aren’t necessarily living better, argues Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biologist and author of Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease.

For years, researchers have been connecting the dots between socioeconomic status and obesity rates. A new study from the University of Washington makes those connections even stronger.

The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity looked at nearly 60,000 men and women in King County. It found that people in South and Southeast King County were much more likely to be obese. The biggest factors were education levels and home values.

Adam Drewnowski is the study’s lead author. He’s a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington and the director of the UW’s Center for Public Health Nutrition. He talks with Marcie Sillman.

Flickr Photo/Mr. Juicebox

As the partial government shutdown drags into its third week, some companies haven’t missed the opportunity to squeeze some publicity out of it. Last week, Starbucks gave away free cups of coffee to anyone who bought another person a beverage in its stores. The company also urged customers to sign a petition, asking lawmakers to end the shutdown.

Your Guide To Avoiding Foodborne Illness

Oct 10, 2013
Flickr Photo/snowpea&bokchoi

On Monday, the USDA issued a warning for salmonella contamination in packaged Foster Farms chicken. Nearly 300 illnesses in 17 states have been reported.

Today, the USDA is threatening to close the three Foster Farms facilities linked to the outbreak. This latest outbreak is just one of the many contamination stories we hear about each year.

The Center for Disease Control estimates that every year, roughly one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illness. How can you protect yourself? Marcie Sillman talks with Scott Meschke, microbiologist and professor Health Sciences at University of Washington.

Flickr Photo/beautifulcataya

Are you ready to take the burdock root challenge? Burdock root is a high source of a complex starch that gives us the energy we need to get through the winter. Registered dietitian Mary Purdy says it is a prime example of the sort of food we should be intruding into our diet during the darkening days of fall and winter.

As we bundle up and spend more time inside we might be tempted to turn to pumpkin lattes and bonbons, but that isn’t the best way to tackle our diminished energy. Purdy is the host of the podcast Nutrition Nuggets; she says there are better ways then caffeine and sugar to keep your energy up during the fall and winter months.

Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer speaks with The Record's Marcie Sillman about whether Canadians are paying attention to the partial government shutdown in the US, Canadian spies snooping around in Brazil and the country's national anthem, which has been accused of being sexist.

Flickr Photo/Jared Kelley

Radiolab is a show about, as the creators simply say, curiosity. It looks into questions on science, philosophy and the human experience. This year, they are touring around the country with their live show, "Apocalyptical." Marcie Sillman talks with hosts Robert Krulwich and Jad Abumrad about their roots and translating science to radio.

Flickr Photo/Ray Terrill

The Seattle Sounders play the Vancouver Whitecaps today. If they win or draw the game they will clinch the Cascadia Cup. The Cascadia Cup was made official in 2004 by the fans of the Portland Timbers, Seattle Sounders and Vancouver Whitecaps, but its history goes even further back.

Before the Cascadia teams were a part of Major League Soccer they played each other in the North American Soccer League and the United Soccer League. Even then, fans would drive the I-5 corridor to attend sell-out games with their banners and voices primed for cheering.

KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Seattle's international reputation has been burnished by the city's thriving technology industries, by the hip independent music scene, and even by the ubiquity of Starbucks. But 100 years before latte vendors squatted on every city corner, Seattle was a thriving maritime hub. It still is.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Cauliflower. It's a pretty white vegetable that most of us were served boiled, steamed and frankly, pretty tasteless. But autumn cauliflower has the potential for big flavor, according to former chef and Seattle food writer Sara Dickerman. The trick lies in how you prepare it.

The Seattle Times/Dean Rutz

Eli Hastings remembers his first writing experience.  "My mom had given me a diary," he recalled. Hastings was in elementary school, and he scrawled down a little poem, the kind of insulting ditty that schoolboys hurl at one another on the playground.

ACT - A Contemporary Theatre

After 77 plays, Alan Ayckbourn knows his way around a theater. Ayckbourn has won every possible accolade during his long career, but even a 2006 stroke that left him with limited use of an arm and leg hasn't stopped the prolific writer and director.

There are more than whispers of a deal to end the shutdown today. Both the Senate and the House are working on proposals. Whether or not they will pass, however, is another question. Marcie Sillman talks with Representative Jim McDermott about the politics inside congress. 

Produced by Hannah Burn

Flickr Photo/Ivan Chang

There is no denying it, autumn has arrived with a bang: the rain, the low temperatures, shorter days and everyone huddled inside together creates the perfect germ-spreading storm. While many people are going out to get their flu shots, there are also a variety of natural ways to ward off illness.

We decided to ask an expert, registered dietitian Mary Purdy. Purdy is the host of the podcast Nutrition Nuggets and she joins us to explain how we can keep a healthy immune system.

Harriet Baskas' book "Hidden Treasures: What the Museums Can't or Won't Show You"

Seattle travel writer Harriet Baskas stumbled onto her quest for hidden treasures. More than 20 years ago, Baskas was visiting small museums in the Pacific Northwest. She was interested in the collections they had on display, but the curators she met were just as interested in what they had in the back rooms: treasures they couldn't, or wouldn't, show the public.

AP Photo/Mike Segar

Iran’s new president Hassan Rouhani addressed the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday. Although he and President Obama didn’t shake hands, the two leaders expressed their desire to open a dialogue.

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