Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

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Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington pain specialist Jane Ballantyne about evolving attitudes towards prescription opiates. 

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the budget deal and whether or not we'll avoid a state shutdown.

Dan Savage and husband Terry Miller are seen in a 2011 photo.
Flickr photo/Chris Tse (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's Dan Savage about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling giving same-sex couples across the United States the right to marry. 

Justice Mary Yu, at the Washington State Supreme Court's Temple of Justice.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman speaks with state Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about her reaction to the legalization of same-sex marriage across the U.S. Yu presided over the first same-sex marriage in King County after statewide legalization in 2012. 

Leija Farr, Seattle's new youth poet laureate, calls poetry a form of "self-healing."
KUOW photo/RadioActive staff

Seattleites love their poetry. The city is home to one of the nation's few poetry-only bookstores, Open Books, in the Wallingford neighborhood.

The Washington state poet laureate, Elizabeth Austen, is a Seattle resident. And the city recently decided to create a Seattle poet laureate position.

Kimberly Rodriguez, a new recruit for the Seattle Police Department, on her first day at the police academy. That class of 30 recruits included eight women, which was unusual. Most classes have between one and five female recruits.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The Seattle Police Department’s initiative to put body cameras on all its officers isn’t a simple matter of just buying some hardware and software.

First, says Mike Wagers, the department’s chief operating officer, that’s about 650 cameras. And those cameras will be generating terabytes of video, he told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

Marcie Sillman talks with book maven Nancy Pearl about a more subtle offering from the science fiction genre: "The City & the City," by China Mieville. It's the story of two worlds that take place simultaneously, in the exact same geographic spot.

Keith Edgerton had to adjust to new ways of getting around after losing his sight.
Kiirsten Flynn

Marcie Sillman talks with Keith Edgerton, Providence Health of Southwest Washington's transportation coordinator, about how being a blind commuter changed his life. 

The U.S. played against Nigeria in their final group match of the World Cup at BC Place, Vancouver, BC. Their 1-0 win allowed them to win their group before going into the knockout stage.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW web producer and freelance soccer reporter Kara McDermott about the progress of the U.S. women's national soccer team in this year's World Cup in Canada. The U.S. survived group play in the group of death and will play for a quarterfinal position Monday night against Colombia.

Rev. Carey G. Anderson speaks during the First African Methodist Episcopal Church’s 125th year anniversary service Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011 in Seattle.
Courtesy Seattle Times/Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times

The first call Rev. Carey G. Anderson received following the mass shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston last week came from Seattle’s police chief.

“Chief O’Toole called me to express her condolence and concern and to let me know, and the black church at large, that SPD is standing available in any way and any capacity,” said Anderson, the pastor at the First A.M.E. Church in Seattle. 

KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Holly Connor of Mercer Island started learning to read and write Braille in preschool.

Now 10, she’s one of North America’s fastest readers and writers in her age group – when it comes to Braille.

Members with the U.S. Forest Service's Lassen Interagency Hotshot crew stationed at Susanville, Calif., observe an Alaska Army National Guard UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter approach a landing zone June 30, 2013, over Palmer, Alaska.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Department of Defense (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Alaska Public Radio reporter Alexandra Guttierez about the challenges of fighting fires in Alaska.

Ta Kwe Say, 23, says this drawing in the book 'Forced to Flee' depicts how Burmese army recruits are programmed to choose violence over justice.
Courtesy of Erika Berg

What would you do if you were forced to leave your country and couldn't go home? For refugees in Washington state, that's more than a hypothetical question.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Peter Lape, curator of archaeology at the Burke Museum, about the significance of recently revealed DNA tests on the Kennewick Man. The tests strongly indicate that the prehistoric male who roamed the Columbia River Basin 9,000 years ago is a distant ancestor of the modern-day Colville Tribe.

Seattle Playwright Yussef El Guindi.
Courtesy ACT Theatre

Seattle-based playwright Yussef El Guindi was born in Egypt. But he feels more at ease in his adopted home.

"Egypt is always going to a part of my background, my heritage," he says. "But I've been here 30 years now. I definitely consider myself American."

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