Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Roosevelt High School, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

After 13 students at Roosevelt High School in Seattle came down with whooping cough, Seattle Public Schools looked at their records and saw they had all been immunized against the highly contagious, bacterial illness.

If they were vaccinated, how did they contract whooping cough, or pertussis?

Century Link Field, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/John Seb Barber (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dave Zirin, sports writer for The Nation, about how the recent federal raids to inspect illegal drug use are just one of many signs that the relationship between the federal government and professional football is changing.

David Shafer's book "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot"

Marcie Sillman gets book explorer Nancy Pearl's pick of the week: David Shafer's dystopian fantasy, "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot."

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Posey Gruener interviews Metro bus drivers at Northgate Transit Center, who describe why they're having trouble catching a bathroom break.

And Marcie Sillman speaks with Paul Bachtel, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 587, which represents transit operators. Bachtel said access to bathrooms is "probably the most significant issue [for the union right now]. It's much greater than wages, or benefits. It's a working issues condition and it's the number one cry of unfairness from our transit operators at this point in time."

Courtesy Jason Yeatman

Two years ago Jason Yeatman, a researcher at the University of Washington, stumbled into a secret corridor of the mind.

Marcie Sillman interviews KUOW health reporter Ruby de Luna about some of the changes the Washington state Health Exchange has made. Last year more than a million Washington state residents signed up for health insurance through the Washington Health Plan Finder website.  Saturday is the first day of open enrollment. People need to sign up or renew their health care plans by February 15, 2015. 

People in black face dress up as Black Peter, a traditional holiday figure in the Netherlands.
Flickr Photo/Hans Pama (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with James Kennedy, an American historian who researches Dutch history at the University of Amsterdam, about the history of Zwarte Piet, or Black Peter, Saint Nick's helper in the Netherlands. 

Celebrations with Black Pete usually involve performers in blackface, and can be seen locally this weekend in Lake Forest Park.

Courtesy Karin Huster

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle nurse Karin Huster, who is getting on a plane this weekend to fight Ebola in Sierra Leone. She previously was providing care in Liberia. As she prepared for this trip, Huster said the hardest part about leaving is not knowing what will happen. The Record will be following Huster's journey. She will be in Sierra Leone until December.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with King County public defender Matthew Pang about the implications of cutting 40 staff members from the King County Department of Public Defense. Pang is the president of the local SEIU chapter that represents public defenders in King County.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Gary Locke,  former U.S. ambassador to China, about the bilateral agreement between the two countries on reduction of carbon emissions and why the two countries have such dissimilar goals.

Courtesy Cornish College of the Arts

What do acclaimed dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham, drag performer par excellence Jinxx Monsoon and conceptual art darling Sutton Beres Culler have in common?

They are all graduates of Seattle's Cornish College of the Arts.

Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with real estate appraiser Richard Hagar about a Seattle City Council proposal to charge developers of new residential and commercial buildings a linkage fee to fund affordable housing.

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil  about the changes Seattle Mayor Ed Murray made this week concerning police accountability. He’s making a citizen oversight group called the Community Police Commission permanent.

Flickr Photo/Kris Krug (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the tight Vancouver mayoral race and how the city is taking lessons from Seattle's successful ballot initiative to fund public transportation.

Flickr Photo/Shawn Campbell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington philosopher Michael Blake about partyism and when it is and  isn't ok to discriminate based on political beliefs.

Pages