Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice sits on the sideline during a preseason game in 2007. Rice was the focus of a domestic violence controversy in 2014.
AP Photo/Nick Wass, File

Marcie Sillman talks with journalist Sam Eifling about the NFL's troubles in 2014 and why we can't stop watching.

A container ship at the Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Bari Bookout (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Bill Mongelluzzo, senior editor at the Journal of Commerce, about the labor dispute between the longshoremen's union and the Pacific Maritime Association at West Coast ports.   

Bill Gates.
Flickr Photo/Thomas Hawk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about Bill Gates, his new role at Microsoft and his many other roles in start-ups, philanthropy and more.

Marcie Sillman talks with Diane Langdon, who has helped organize marches to defend police officers' reputation in the wake of recent protests against police use-of-force. 

Wikimedia Commons

Harvard Professor Emeritus E. O. Wilson has spent most of his 60-year career in pursuit of evolutionary biology. His studies of and writings about ants and their social organizations earned him the moniker "the father of sociobiology," as well as a a bevy of honors and awards, including two Pulitzer Prizes and a U.S. National Medal of Science.

Now, at the age of 85, Wilson has widened his intellectual curiosity beyond biology. Wilson's latest book has the audacious title "The Meaning of Human Existence." It's the second volume in a planned trilogy. Wilson says these days he's interested in what he calls the big questions.

"What are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going?"

Jews, Chinese Food And Christmas: A Love Story

Dec 24, 2014
Chinese food fortune cookie
Flickr Photo/Ginny (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Hanna Raskin, former food critic for the Seattle Weekly, about the historical reasons why American Jews traditionally eat Chinese food on Christmas.

Flickr Photo/Goodiez (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with state Senators Jeanne Kohl-Welles and Ann Rivers about their proposals to regulate medical marijuana in Washington state.

Flickr Photo/Jake Bouma (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman and librarian Nancy Pearl discuss escaping into a good book with this week's recommendation, "F," by Daniel Kehlmann, translated from the German by Carol Brown Janeway.

Marcie Sillman talks to Jon Talton, economic and business columnist for the Seattle Times, about the middle class in the Pacific Northwest and around the country.

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins, about the upcoming session and what that could mean for education funding in Washington state.

USPS unveiled a marketing campaign this year in advance of the hectic holiday delivery season.
Screen shot from YouTube

Marcie Sillman talks with Jo Ann Pyle about working conditions for U.S. Postal Service workers during the holiday season. Pyle is president of Branch 79 of the National Association of Letter Carriers in Seattle.

School desk
Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Steve Sundquist, chair of the Washington State Charter School Commission, about the probation of Washington's first charter school and what it means for the many schools set to open next year.

A still from the music video Mississippi Misfit by Seattle band INLY.
INLY / Vimeo

The camera pans across four bathroom stall doors, revealing a set of legs in each.

It stops at the last stall, where no legs are visible. Instead, a muscular arm reaches down, and Seattle musician Mindie Lind lowers her body to the floor, to the beat of the tune she wrote, “Mississippi Misfit,” performed by her band INLY.

It’s part of Lind’s not-so-secret strategy to create a public conversation about what she calls “Crip Culture” – the issues that people with physical disabilities face every day.

book Christmas holiday reading
Flickr Photo/Enokson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets a last minute gift recommendation from Seattle's jolliest librarian, Nancy Pearl. If you still have a child on your list, she suggests picking up "Take Away the A," by Michael Escoffier and Chris DiGiacomo.

pie food
Flickr Photo/sea turtle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman and Kate Lebo, baker and author of "Pie School: Lessons in Fruit, Flour And Butter," discuss the best way to make a pie crust.

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