Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman speaks with Patricia Coffey and Maggie Kilbourne-Brook, both of the Seattle-based global health nonprofit PATH, about the Caya countoured diaphragm, also known as the SILCS diaphragm, which was recently approved by the FDA.

Seattle trash filled with coffee cups.
Flickr Photo/Velo_Montana (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Heather Trim, Zero Waste Seattle leader, about what it would take for the city to be trash free. 

Students study in a Singapore Starbucks.
Flickr Photo/Nicola Sapiens De Mitri (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Yoonsun Choi, University of Chicago professor, about the "model minority" myth and why lumping Asian students in one category makes it harder for people to succeed. 

film movie
Flickr Photo/StudioTempura (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Washington Filmworks executive director Amy Lillard about a legislative proposal that would increase the amount of tax incentives for film productions in Washington state.

Edna Daigre, center, teaches a class for older dancers in Seattle's Central Area.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Doris Tunney doesn’t even pretend to be offended when you ask how old she is.

“I’m 86,” she says proudly. “I’ll be 87 on March 26.”

Tunney is petite, with cinnamon brown skin, short, curly white hair and perfect posture. Dressed in denim capris and a long-sleeved cotton shirt, this octogenarian is ready to dance.

Where Blind Baseball Players Play To Win

Feb 26, 2015
Coach Kevin Daniel and captain Dino Sanchez of the Seattle South King Sluggers.
Facebook

When Kevin Daniel moved to Seattle, he assumed the city would have something he was leaving behind in Spokane: a blind baseball team.

That wasn’t the case. So in 2013 Daniel formed the Seattle South King Sluggers after asking one very important question: If he started a team, could they win?

Ross Reynolds talks with outgoing Seattle City Councilmembers Nick Licata, Sally Clark and Tom Rasmussen about how district elections will change our city.

Also, Marcie Sillman hears from UCLA political scientist Chris Tausanovitch on the subject.

Protesters of the Keystone Pipeline in San Francisco, Calif., in November 2013.
Flickr Photo/Enviros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the news from Canada, including Canada's response over President Obama's veto of the Keystone XL Pipeline and terrorist threats to Canadian malls.

Vandalism at Bothell Hindu Temple and Cultural Center.
Courtesy of HTCC/Nitya Niranjan

Marcie Sillman talks to Kami Simmons, professor of law at Wake Forest University Law school in North Carolina, about the challenges of proving a hate crime.

Last week the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center in Bothell and Skyview Junior High School were vandalized by graffiti that read "get out" with a swastika symbol and "get out Muslims." Now leaders of the Hindu temple and local interfaith leaders in the community are calling for a federal investigation of the incident.  

Seattle Police guard a building during protests on Dec. 6, 2014, in response to the killings of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association and a long-time follower of police reform in Seattle, about how a decades-old city ordinance may hinder Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole's efforts to reform the department.

File photo of Seattle University.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle University adjunct instructor Larry Cushnie about why he's advocating for improved working conditions for adjunct faculty at Seattle University.

book read Nancy Pearl
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets this week's reading recommendation from everyone's favorite librarian, Nancy Pearl. She suggests the latest police procedural from Richard Price (under the pen name Harry Brandt), "The Whites."

Photo of school buses parked in a parking lot.
Flickr Photo/tncountryfan

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the big policy sticking points facing Washington lawmakers concerning education.

Port of Seattle, port, stadium, Century Link
Flickr Photo/ArtBrom (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Kevin Klowden, managing director of the California Center at the Milken Institute, about the long-term impact of the slowdown at the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle. The slowdown ended over the weekend after nine months of contract negotiations between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association.

The South Lake Union trolley.
Flickr Photo/Atomic Taco (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Facebook's expansion into South Lake Union. 

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