Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Matthew Streib

Marcie Sillman talks with Roxanne Fonder Reeve, who, along with a slew of volunteers, is building a trash studio in her Columbia City driveway to teach people how they can build environmentally sustainable housing out of found materials.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.
Flickr Photo/Heisenberg Media (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about how Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's first year on the job went, how tablets are doing in the market and other Seattle tech news.

Isoseismal map of the event.
Wikimedia Commons

In 1872, a mass earthquake rocked the Northwest. It’s on record as one of the most widely felt temblors in the Pacific Northwest.

But the location of the fault line that caused the quake has been a mystery for more than a century. They didn’t even know which side of the Cascades the fault fell.

Black Friday in downtown Seattle at Westlake in 2010.
Flickr Photo/John Henderson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with linguistics journalist Ben Zimmer about the origins of the shopping phrases "Black Friday,"  "Cyber Monday," and "Super Saturday."

Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with beloved librarian Nancy Pearl, who recommends a new history of WWI through the lens of poetry: Max Egremont's book, "Some Desperate Glory."

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

The Thanksgiving menu might seem static, but it's changed a lot over the years. The Pilgrims brought eel. The Wampanoag brought venison. Caribbean cooks introduced sweet potatoes. And the French brought us pie crust. 

So what might this most American feast look like in the future? The Record invited two cooks to the studio to propose some ways Seattle might mix up the Thanksgiving menu. They're both graduates of Project Feast, a program at the Tukwila Community Center that teaches refugee and immigrant cooks the skills they need to work in commercial kitchens. 

Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the fate of Initiative 1351, the class size measure passed by voters earlier this month.

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

    

Marcie Sillman speaks with Joshua Plotnik, founder and CEO of Think Elephants International, about the debate over where to send Bamboo and Chai, Woodland Park Zoo's remaining two Asian elephants. The zoo announced Wednesday that they've decided to phase out their elephant program. 

photo courtesy Pacific Northwest Ballet

When Kent Stowell and his wife, Francia Russell, took over artistic leadership at Pacific Northwest Ballet more than 30 years ago they wanted to build the tiny regional dance company into a national ballet powerhouse. To help them reach that goal, they decided to create a signature holiday production at PNB, a ballet that would distinguish them from all the other American ballet companies.

The logical choice was a new adaptation of "Nutcracker," the story of a young girl who's given a nutcracker doll that magically comes to life. Different versions of this Christmas story are performed across the country.

The theater revised its number of seats down from 798 to 570. The seats are leather and offer enough leg room for an average size adult woman to fully extend her legs (claim tested).
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

The Cinerama, a property managed by Paul Allen's Vulcan Real Estate, has reopened after an extensive, top-of-the-line renovation. Marcie Sillman speaks with Jennifer Bean, director of the cinema and media studies program at the University of Washington, about the history of Seattle's Cinerama, and the ways that movie theaters lure moviegoers into their seats.

Washington State Auctions Picasso Sketchbook

Nov 20, 2014
Drawings from inside the Picasso sketchbook.
Courtesy of James G. Murphy Co.

Marcie Sillman talks with Chiyo Ishikawa, deputy director for art and curator of European painting and sculpture at the Seattle Art Museum, about the state revenue department's auctioning of a sketchbook dated 1912 that contains 27 drawings thought to be the work of Pablo Picasso. 
A scene from "All the Way," a play about President Lyndon B. Johnson by Seattle playwright Robert Schenkkan.
Seattle Repertory Theatre

For those of us who came of age in the 1960s, Texas Democrat Lyndon Baines Johnson was larger than life. 

Johnson had years of Congressional politicking under his belt when he was thrust into the presidency after John F. Kennedy's assassination. He used that political experience to change America. The Johnson administration ushered in a new era for civil rights, as well as environmental protections, among other cultural paradigm shifts.

Canadians Cope With Crushed Keystone XL Dreams

Nov 19, 2014
Protesters of the Keystone Pipeline in San Francisco, Calif., in November 2013.
Flickr Photo/Enviros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about Canadians' response to the United States Senate's rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline and the results of the Vancouver, B.C. mayoral race.

Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/SLV Native (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Eric Schinfeld about how Washington business are being affected by a work slowdown at the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma. Schinfeld is oresident of the Washington Council on International Trade.

Then, Marcie Sillman gets reaction from International Longshore and Warehouse Union spokesperson Craig Merrilees.

Roosevelt High School, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

After 13 students at Roosevelt High School in Seattle came down with whooping cough, Seattle Public Schools looked at their records and saw they had all been immunized against the highly contagious, bacterial illness.

If they were vaccinated, how did they contract whooping cough, or pertussis?

Pages