Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about this week’s reading recommendation: artist Sally Mann’s memoir “Hold Still.” Mann is a photographer with an MFA in creative writing. Pearl says that her memoir will delight even people who aren’t aware of her work. 

A photo of Ann Rule in 1976 from her official website. Rule was the author, most famously, of The Stranger Beside Me, about her personal relationship with serial killer Ted Bundy before he was caught.
Leslie Rule/AuthorAnnRule.com

Marcie Sillman talks with The Stranger's Eli Sanders about bestselling true-crime writer Ann Rule, who died on Sunday at age 83. Sanders wrote an in-depth profile about Rule for The Seattle Times.

Marcie Sillman speaks to Todd Bishop about what's new in Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system.

Grapes on the vineyards of Cave B Winery in Quincy, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Samantha Levang (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dick Boushey, a grower and vineyard manager in the Red Mountain area, about the impact of heat on Washington's $1 billion wine industry. 

U.S. Geological Survey

Kathryn Schulz’s New Yorker article about Northwest earthquakes sent shockwaves through the Seattle area last week.

It described the damage a 9.0 magnitude quake offshore in the Cascadia subduction zone and resulting tsunami would do across a broad swath of the West Coast. The piece in the New Yorker itself was titled "The Really Big One," but a scarier headline appeared on social media: “The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle.”

Seattle artist Fay Jones created this mural in the Westlake bus tunnel in the late 1980s.
Metro King County

Even if you don’t know her name, you’ve probably seen artist Fay Jones’ work.

She created one of the giant murals on the walls of Seattle’s underground Westlake Transit Station. It's a 10-foot-high, 35-foot-long fantasia of men, women and fish.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about successes in British Columbia's fight against HIV and AIDS.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about a pick that's aimed at teens, but great for readers of all ages: "The Game of Love and Death," by Martha Brockenbrough.

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marcie Sillman talks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about Amazon and other tech companies about their civic engagement.

Artist Lois Thadei in woven hat, photographed at Ginger Street in Olympia during Art Walk.
Courtesy of Kay Shultz

Lois Thadei’s full name is Lois Chichnikoff Thadei.

But everyone calls her Louie. She says white people have a hard time pronouncing her name.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman discusses this week's reading recommendation with librarian Nancy Pearl. For very young readers, Pearl has chosen "Walter the Lazy Mouse," by Marjorie Flack.

The clarinet came to William O. Smith in the form of a door-to-door salesman during the Great Depression.
Flickr Photo by Peter Miller (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Clarinetist William O. Smith has a most unusual website.

When you click on the link, it opens to dueling photographs. Smith's a man with two distinct names and musical identities.

Seattle Seahawks' Derrick Coleman speaks with members of the media about how he can read lips, before an NFL football practice Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, in Renton, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Seahawk fullback Derrick Coleman about his new book "No Excuses" and what it was like learning to play football with a hearing impairment. 

Marcie Sillman talks to  hip-hop artist DJ Blesone about his motivation behind breakdancing.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about "Foolscap," by Michael Malone, which she thinks would be a good pick for fans of academic satires like Jane Smiley's "Moo" or Richard Russo's "Straight Man."

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