Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Flickr Photo/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Washington state lawmakers have a lot on their plates this legislative session: everything from how to fully fund basic education to a debate over how to control pollution. But some legislators also put medical marijuana regulation on their priority list.

biotech file photo
Flickr Photo/HCC PIO (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks to Luke Timmerman about the growth of a Seattle biotech company, Adaptive Biotechnologies, and what it means for the city's biotechnology industry.

Governor Jay Inslee.
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia corespondent Austin Jenkins about the politics around the carbon tax and other issues facing the state legislature this session. 

Amazon's "Transparent" received two Golden Globes on Sunday.
Facebook Photo/Transparent

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, GeekWire co-founder, about Amazon's big win at the Golden Globes. They also discuss the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. 

U.S. Capital congress
Flickr Photo/Stephen Melkisethian (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Cathy Allen, political consultant and president of The Connections Group, about Washington state's political clout in Congress now that the majority party is Republican.

Flickr Photo/PJMixer (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with real estate appraiser Richard Hagar about how the influx of people to Seattle has caused housing prices region-wide to skyrocket, even in rural areas.

New Seattle Opera General Director Aidan Lang
Facebook/Seattle Opera

The first sign that change has come to Seattle Opera is on the walls.

Many of the temporary partitions that for years divided the Opera's administrative office into a warren of cubicles are gone. The cramped room feels bigger, or at least roomier. There's space to breath.

New General Director Aidan Lang has performed a similar surgery on his corner office. Gone is predecessor Speight Jenkins' couch and stuffed animals. In its place are a neatly organized desk and a business-like round table and chairs.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jackson Brown, manager of the University of Washington's e-sports team, the Purple Castor Mignons, about the team's big win in 2014 and how e-sports is making a splash on the Seattle campus.

Flickr Photo/Joe Thorn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to librarian Nancy Pearl about her recommendation for the week: "Spooner," a novel by Pete Dexter that Pearl first read in 2009 and still loves.

How To Print A Hand From Home

Jan 6, 2015
Credit e-NABLE

 Marcie Sillman speaks with Ivan Owen, co-creator of a 3D printed hand design that inspired a collaborative online community to make prosthetics for people on limited budgets.

Charles R. Johnson with Ralph Ellison
Wikipedia Photo/Robin Platzer

As a teenager, University of Washington professor emeritus Charles Johnson discovered a book on yoga and meditation on his mom’s bookshelf that sparked his interest in practicing Buddhism.

Johnson spoke with Marcie Sillman on KUOW’s The Record to discuss the intersection of race, religion and his writing. His newest book is called “Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice.”

Costco
Flickr Photo/Mike Mozart (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Erik Nicholson, vice president of the United Farm Workers Union, about the Equitable Food Initiative, a new labeling system to ensure food safety and create better working conditions for farmer workers.

The sign at Pike Place Market.
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with former Seattle PI arts writer R.M. Campbell about the civic group Allied Arts and the role it played in shaping the city. Campbell's new book is called "Stirring Up Seattle: Allied Arts in the Civic Landscape."

Naloxone has been touted as an heroin overdose reversal drug.
Flickr Photo/intropin (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Caleb Banta-Green, senior researcher at University of Washington’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, about naloxone, the overdose reversal drug.

An armpit dye model. Roxie Hunt of Vain salon in downtown Seattle started dying friend's armpits in bright Kool-Aid colors. That little experiment garnered international attention.
Courtesy Roxie Hunt, How To Hair Girl

Roxie Hunt didn't set out to be a spokesperson for armpit hair and feminism.

But one day Hunt stopped shaving under her armpits, a decision that sparked conversations about body hair and fashion choices at Vain, the downtown salon where she works.

And then she got another idea: What if they dyed their armpit hair in electric Kool-Aid colors? Hunt, who runs the popular How To Hair Girl blog, dyed her friend’s armpits a bright teal blue to match her hair. And then she blogged about it in a post that got shared 30,000 times.

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