Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Matt Baretto, University of California Los Angeles political science professor, about California's voting rights act and what Washington could learn from the other state.

marijuana joint pot
Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Washington researcher Kevin Haggerty, who says confusion over the state's marijuana law gets in the way of important conversations about teen drug use. 

Rainier Avenue street Seattle
Flickr Photo/Matthew Rutledge (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phyllis Porter, outreach coordinator and events specialist at Rainier Valley Greenways Project, about the Seattle Department of Transportation's plan to improve traffic safety on Rainier Avenue.

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about Apple's big event on wearable technology. 

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about Joel's Law, the legislative proposal that would allow families to petition a court to have a loved one involuntarily committed to a mental hospital.

Sillman also talks with David Johnson, CEO of Navos, a Seattle-based mental health service provider.

A shot of Barrow, Alaska at midnight with the sun still visible. Alaska currently has one time zone for the mainland and another for the Aleutian Islands.
Flickr Photo/Andrei Taranchenko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Guiterrez of Alaska Public Media about the Alaska state Senate's bill that would abolish daylight saving time and open up a discussion to divide Alaska into multiple time zones.

File photo of homeless person in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Alice Shobe about rapid re-housing and how the strategy fits into ending homelessness in Seattle and King County. Shobe is executive director of the Seattle nonprofit Building Changes.

Jennifer Zeyl
Courtesy of Jennifer Zeyl

Jennifer Zeyl cheerfully confesses that she knows her own mind. She's got a strong vision and she doesn't hesitate to make that vision a reality.

"I found when I first got out here, because I'm from the East Coast, people would react to me like, 'Whoa!'"

She starts to laugh, then turns serious.

Scantron test sheet
Flickr Photo/COCOEN daily photos (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Times reporter Leah Todd about why some school board members want to suspend Common Core-related exams in Seattle Public Schools.

Marcie Sillman talks with Bill Hobson about 1811 Eastlake -- a facility that houses formerly homeless, chronic alcoholics and allows people to drink. Hobson is executive director of the Downtown Emergency Service Center.

Marcie Sillman talks with Kristin Rowe Finkbeiner, executive director of MomsRising, about gender pay equity and other issues facing women in the workplace. 

Flickr Photo/Joe Thorn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets the week's reading recommendations from beloved librarian, Nancy Pearl, who suggests Priyar Parmar's, "Vanessa and Her Sister." The historical novel provides insight into the novelist Virginia Woolf and her sister, Vanessa Bell.

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman speaks with Patricia Coffey and Maggie Kilbourne-Brook, both of the Seattle-based global health nonprofit PATH, about the Caya countoured diaphragm, also known as the SILCS diaphragm, which was recently approved by the FDA.

Seattle trash filled with coffee cups.
Flickr Photo/Velo_Montana (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Heather Trim, Zero Waste Seattle leader, about what it would take for the city to be trash free. 

Students study in a Singapore Starbucks.
Flickr Photo/Nicola Sapiens De Mitri (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Yoonsun Choi, University of Chicago professor, about the "model minority" myth and why lumping Asian students in one category makes it harder for people to succeed. 

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