Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about this week's reading pick: a new graphic biography of the famous Apple co-founder called "Steve Jobs: Insanely Great," by Jessie Hartland. Pearl says it rivals even Walter Isaacson's "Steve Jobs," which is considered the definitive biography of the tech leader.

Gordon Hirabayashi, a sociology student at the University of Washington, violated curfew set for Japanese Americans in Seattle.

When Jeanne Sakata was growing up near Watsonville, California, her parents never talked about what happened to them during World War II. Like thousands of other Japanese-Americans on the West Coast, Sakata’s family had been forcibly removed from their home and sent to an armed camp.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about this week's reading recommendation: Rinker Buck's first hand account of recreating in the 21st century the famous treks of the 19th century in, "The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey." Pearl says it's perfect fodder for your next summer road trip.

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phil Talmadge, former Washington state Democratic legislator and former state justice, about the McCleary decision concerning education funding and how it's dividing government. 

Seattle Convention Center.
Flickr Photo/Dave Reid

Marcie Sillman talks with Visit Seattle CEO Tom Norwalk about the convention center expansion and how he believes it will benefit citizens. 

Marcie Sillman talks to Luke Timmerman, founder and editor of the Timmerman Report, about Juno Therapeutics and other biotech startups like Just Biotherapeutics that came out of the closure of Amgen's Seattle offices last year. 

Promotional material for the Seattle Art Fair.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Art Fair

Marcie Silman talks to Jen Graves, visual arts writer for The Stranger, about the inaugural Seattle Art Fair and whether or not it will be good for local art and artists.

Madeline DeFrees in 1967. The poet, formerly a nun, would tuck an envelope and pencil into the deep pockets of her habit to write when she had time.
Lee Nye via

Madeline DeFrees published her first poem at the age of 12.

It was called “Sympathy,” written for a Portland newspaper poetry contest.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist with the Vancouver Sun, about the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the tension it has caused between the US and Canada. 

Courtesy of MOHAI/Staff Photographer at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Warning: If you live in Seattle, this might break your heart.

Once upon a time, Seattle was a pioneer in transportation planning.

City officials thought in terms of economic expediency and asked themselves, how could we get our residents around as quickly as possible? Thus, at the beginning of the 20th century, the streetcar system was born.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about this week’s reading recommendation: artist Sally Mann’s memoir “Hold Still.” Mann is a photographer with an MFA in creative writing. Pearl says that her memoir will delight even people who aren’t aware of her work. 

A photo of Ann Rule in 1976 from her official website. Rule was the author, most famously, of The Stranger Beside Me, about her personal relationship with serial killer Ted Bundy before he was caught.
Leslie Rule/

Marcie Sillman talks with The Stranger's Eli Sanders about bestselling true-crime writer Ann Rule, who died on Sunday at age 83. Sanders wrote an in-depth profile about Rule for The Seattle Times.

Marcie Sillman speaks to Todd Bishop about what's new in Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system.

Grapes on the vineyards of Cave B Winery in Quincy, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Samantha Levang (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dick Boushey, a grower and vineyard manager in the Red Mountain area, about the impact of heat on Washington's $1 billion wine industry. 

U.S. Geological Survey

Kathryn Schulz’s New Yorker article about Northwest earthquakes sent shockwaves through the Seattle area last week.

It described the damage a 9.0 magnitude quake offshore in the Cascadia subduction zone and resulting tsunami would do across a broad swath of the West Coast. The piece in the New Yorker itself was titled "The Really Big One," but a scarier headline appeared on social media: “The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle.”