Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Terrence Roberts is shown at age 15 on Sept. 22, 1957, reading a newspaper after trying to enter all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. He was turned away but tried again the next day.
AP PHOTO

Terrence Roberts didn’t hesitate when volunteers were sought to integrate an all-white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas.

"We had lived so long under the aegis of separate but equal," says Roberts, who was in Seattle last week to address graduates of the University of Washington School of Social Work.

Lara Davis is the arts education manager for Seattle's Office of Arts and Culture
Seattle.gov

Once upon a time, when you were young, you probably painted pictures, sang songs and danced yourself dizzy.

Many artists and arts educators believe that making art is second nature to humans. And they believe it helps kids learn. But somehow, by the time children reach their teens, many lose their enthusiasm for creative activities. Experts say that lack of arts curriculum in schools may be to blame.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl for this week's memoir recommendations: 

  • "Raising Demons" and "Life Among the Savages," by Shirley Jackson
  • "Please Don't Eat the Daisies," by Jean Kerr
  • "Quiet! Yelled Mrs. Rabbit," by Hilda Cole Espy
  • "The Egg and I," by Betty MacDonald.

Seattle Is Getting A Poetic New Post

Jun 9, 2015

Marcie Sillman speaks with Elizabeth Austen, Washington state poet laureate, about a new poetry post in Seattle. The city will name a civic poet for Seattle by early August.

From Seattle Art Museum's exhibition, "Disguise."
Courtesy of Seattle Art Museum

Get ready for the next Front Row Center with Marcie Sillman!

Join KUOW and fellow listeners at the Seattle Art Museum on July 23 in the Nordstrom Lecture Hall from 7 - 8:30 p.m.

The event will feature a conversation between Sillman and Pam McClusky, curator of art of Africa & Oceania, about SAM's special exhibition "Disguise: Masks & Global African Art."

Guests are encouraged to explore the exhibition before the program. This event is free with a ticket to the exhibition. 

Purchase a ticket to the exhibition using promo code KUOW for a discounted ticket, and make sure to RSVP for the Front Row Center conversation!

Alberta Eyes $15 Minimum Wage

Jun 8, 2015

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about a movement to raise the minimum wage in the province of Alberta to $15 an hour.

Megan Rapinoe is seen in action in 2012.
Flickr photo/kimphotography (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talked to Megan Rapinoe, midfielder for the Seattle Reign FC and the U.S. Women's National Team in 2013 about her career and the future of soccer in the United States. The women's team opens play in the World Cup in Canada on Monday.

The giant Pacific octopus can change colors when disturbed or excited.
Courtesy of Janna Nichols

Imagine for a moment a sentient being that’s radically unlike a human: No bones, numerous limbs that can “taste” you, a slimy body that can squirt through small holes, a mysterious intelligence. This is not science fiction. This is the giant Pacific octopus, one of the many secrets of Puget Sound.

Writer Sy Montgomery made it a personal goal to get as close as she could to one of these large cephalopods for a new book, "The Soul Of An Octopus."

business board room
Flickr Photo/Eric Dan (CC-BY-NC-ND)

More men named John, Robert, William or James run the boards of America’s largest companies than women do.

And in the Pacific Northwest, the numbers are worse than the national average.

The state of Alaska has sent thousands of pink slips to its workers. The ripple effects could affect the fishing industry.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of Alaska Public Radio about the budget standstill in Alaska's Legislature and how a government shutdown will affect the lives of Alaskans. 

Pacific Northwest Ballet principal dancers Carla Korbes and Batkhurel Bold in George Balanchine's "Diamonds."
PNB/Angela Sterling

When Seattle ballerina Carla Korbes dons a white tutu in the classic ballet, “Swan Lake,” she can make you believe she’s a swan.

That uncanny ability has made Korbes a darling in the ballet world – so beloved that New York Times chief dance critic Alastair Macaulay regularly flies out to see her perform. He calls her one of the world’s greatest ballerinas today because of how she feels the music and embodies the characters.

An example of Seattle's Pollinator Pathway.
Pollinatorpathway.com

Sarah Bergmann was working at a New York ad agency when she heard about the decline in honeybee populations. The agency was working on a campaign to raise awareness of the honeybee, Bergmann says.

"The more I read, the more I realized the honeybee is actually a symptom," she says.

PNB soloist Kiyon Gaines in Twyla Tharp's "Waiting at the Station."
Courtesy PNB/Angela Sterling

Pacific Northwest Ballet soloist Kiyon Gaines says he didn’t find ballet -- ballet found him.

The Baltimore native didn’t start dancing until he was 10. He studied tap and jazz. Somebody told him that ballet lessons would help him with how he carried his arms. So his mother enrolled him in a local class.

Marcie Sillman talks to Jake Beattie, executive director of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, about the Race to Alaska, in which contestants row, paddle or sail 750 miles to Ketchikan, Alaska. 

A gray wolf trots along a road in Washington state.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks with the executive director of the Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration, Francine Madden, about the underlying tensions in Washington's battle over wolf management. 

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