Marcie Sillman

Arts and Culture Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focused on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region. After two years as Senior Host of the program, Marcie returned to full-time cultural reporting.

Ways to Connect

KUOW's Marcie Sillman with book hugger Nancy Pearl.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about Nick Harkaway's novel, "The Gone-Away World."

Sarah Rudinoff at the piano at On The Boards.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Powerhouse.

That’s the best way to describe Seattle performer Sarah Rudinoff.

Washington Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann gestures as he is carried off the field at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., Nov. 18, 1985. Theismann injured his right leg during second quarter action.
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about her pick of the week, "The Throwback Special" by Chris Bachelder.

A classic Craftsman in Seattle's Mount Baker neighborhood. Most of the neighborhood was developed in the early 20th century when architecture was in its heyday.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Look around almost any Seattle neighborhood and you’ll see them: Modest one-story homes, with large, covered porches and eaves that shield wooden siding from the rain.

They’re Craftsman-style bungalows, and you’ll find hundreds of them here, from Wallingford and Ravenna to Mount Baker and over the bridge in West Seattle.

Paul Kalanithi's 'When Breath Becomes Air'
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about her pick of the week, "When Breath Becomes Air," by Paul Kalanithi.

Velocity Dance Center Artistic Director Tonya Lockyer at V2
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Capitol Hill has more artists and arts groups per capita than any almost any other Seattle neighborhood. Now some of those artists have a new place to work, at least temporarily.

Last month city officials announced that the vacant Value Village store in the Pike-Pine corridor would re-open as V2 Arts Space under the management of Velocity Dance Center. 

Open Books, Seattle's only poetry-only bookstore.
Flickr Photo/J Brew (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/3JQB13

The West Coast’s only bookstore devoted exclusively to poetry is up for sale.

John Marshall, co-owner of Seattle’s Open Books, said after 29 years in the business, he’s ready to retire.

He said the time is right for somebody younger with more energy to shepherd the bookstore into the 21st century.

Vyvyn Lazonga, a tattoo artist for 43 years, now dedicates half of her practice to women who have had mastectomies, meaning the removal of one or more breasts. She works in a shop next to Pike Place Market in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Thirty years ago, a woman walked into Vyvyn Lazonga’s San Francisco shop and asked the tattoo artist to ink new nipples onto her chest.

The woman had undergone a mastectomy after a breast cancer diagnosis, and she wanted to recreate a semblance of the breast she’d lost.

That was Lazonga’s first foray into post-mastectomy tattooing. Although she can’t say for certain, Lazonga believes she was the first person in the country to tattoo over mastectomy scars.

Clockwise from top, left: Kaela Jackson (senior, Garfield), Julia Tanner (sophomore, Roosevelt), Kat Pompermayer (sophomore, Northwest), Ferdos al-Haider (freshman, Franklin), Beatriz Souza (senior, Interlake), Eliana Glass (senior, Roosevelt)
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Essentially Ellington, a high school jazz festival in New York City, has released the names of 15 bands that will attend the contest finals in New York in May.

Three local high schools will be at Lincoln Center: Garfield High School and Roosevelt High School, both from Seattle, and Mount Si High School, of Snoqualmie. Those three bands also made the finals in 2015.

Nancy Pearl's pick: 'This Old Man' by Roger Angell.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "This Old Man," by longtime New Yorker fiction editor Roger Angell. Nancy calls it the perfect book for anybody who reads The New Yorker.

Clockwise from top, left: Colby Lamson-Gordon (junior, Lakeside), Susana Davidson (soph., Garfield), Bell Thompson (soph., Garfield), Lauren Martinez (Garfield), Kelly Barr-Clingan (director), Maia Nelson (sophomore, Garfield)
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Kelly Barr Clingan is a woman on a mission.

That mission is music, specifically jazz.

Barr Clingan directs the bands program at Seattle’s Washington Middle School. She also plays trombone in a Mexican band. And she teaches classes for a nonprofit organization called Seattle JazzED.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

When book-loving KUOW listeners are at a loss for what to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the call is to "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Nancy and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a listener in Clinton, Washington who loved the "The Bone Tree" by Greg Iles. 

Nancy's picks include: "Time's Witness" and "Uncivil Seasons" by Michael Malone, "Black Water Rising" and "Pleasantville" by Attica Locke, and Angela Flournoy's debut novel, "The Turner House."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll patch you through to Seattle's favorite librarian to see if she can guide you to your next book.

Donald Byrd, choreographer for Spectrum Dance Theater, is demanding a more frank dialogue about race.
Spectrum Dance Theater/Ian Douglas

Spectrum Dance Theater’s Donald Byrd wants to shake up the conversations about race in this country.

“People are cautious,” says Byrd, a choreographer. “Given the times we live in, we can’t be cautious.”

Washington state's fourth poet laureate Tod Marshall.
Gonzaga University

If you want to be Washington State’s poet laureate, you have to apply for the job, the same way you’d apply to be a teacher or a bookkeeper.

Nancy Pearl said you'll learn more than you ever thought possible about mules from this week's reading picks.
Flickr Photo/Greg Westfall (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sS617i

When KUOW listeners are at a loss for what book to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the person picking up the phone is "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Pearl and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a history buff in Seabeck, Washington who loved Bernard DeVoto's "The Journals of Lewis and Clark."

Pearl recommends "The Oregon Trail" by Rinker Buck and another title by DeVoto, "Across the Wide Missouri."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll see if Seattle's favorite librarian can guide you to your next book.

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