Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Marcie Sillman talks with food safety attorney Bill Marler about his lasting impact on food safety after he got his start in the E-coli outbreak of 1993.

Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about the beloved librarian's weekly reading recommendation: a science-fiction novel by Felix Gilman, "The Revolutions."

If you're a Northwest camper, chances are some of your gear, like your camp stove or sleeping pad, was manufactured in Seattle by Cascade Designs.
Flickr Photo/Tom Check (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with David Burroughs, vice chairman of Cascade Designs, about how Seattle's rising minimum wage is affecting his business.

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Amazon's affect on brick and mortar retail.

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the politics of gun control in Washington state.

Port of Seattle, port, stadium, Century Link
Flickr Photo/ArtBrom (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph to get the latest upates on the labor dispute that shut down Seattle ports over the weekend.

Also, Ross Reynolds interviews John Ahlquist, co-author of the book, "In the Interest of Others: Organizations and Social Activism,” which looks at the history of the longshoremen and the union's involvement in politics. Ahlquist is a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

John Luther Adams
MELANIE BURFORD FOR NPR MUSIC

Heavy.

Gentle.

A gigantic, slow-motion movement.

Those are terms used to describe “Become Ocean,” the composition that on Sunday night clinched the Seattle Symphony’s first-ever Grammy.

geoduck
Flickr Photo/USDAgov

Marcie Sillman talks with Sean McDonald, a research scientist at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, to find out what impact geoduck farms can have. The demand for Puget Sound's weirdest looking clams has turned growing and harvesting them into a multi-million dollar industry. Now Taylor Shellfish wants to build a new 25-acre geoduck farm in Pierce County, but some environmental groups and residents have concerns.

photo by Teri Pieper

When you think about a dance performance, you may envision something grand and expansive, like “Nutcracker.” Or maybe a sparkly ballroom competition comes to mind, something akin to “Dancing With the Stars.”

Whatever the dance style, these performances are about bodies moving in space. In this case, big spaces.

Rhinos in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Seattle company is bioengineering rhino horns to cut down on poaching.`
Flickr Photo/Ian Turk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Pembient co-founder Matthew Markus. The local biotech startup is bioengineering rhino horn powder with the hopes of curbing poaching in Africa.

Marcie Sillman talks to Katha Pollitt, columnist for The Nation, about her book "Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights" and the argument for the pro-choice movement. 

Photo by Angela Sterling

KUOW’s Front Row Center is Back!

Join Marcie Sillman and your fellow listeners for KUOW's Front Row Center. See a show together, then meet up for great conversation afterwards.

First up: Enjoy a discounted Saturday matinee of Pacific Northwest Ballet’s The Vertiginous Thrill of Forsythe on March 14 at 2 p.m., and stay afterwards for a conversation with Marcie Sillman, PNB artistic director Peter Boal, and company dancers.

More information about the show >>

Buy your discounted ticket >>

Gail Godwin's new book, 'Publishing,' is an inside look at the industry.
David Hermon

Gail Godwin is best known as an award-winning novelist, but Nancy Pearl told KUOW's Marcie Sillman that with her new book, Godwin explores her relationship with the publishing industry. The book is called "Publishing."

Marcie Sillman talks with urban planner and former Seattle City Councilmember Peter Steinbrueck about Seattle's Urban Village Strategy for guiding growth. Steinbrueck authored a report on how the strategy has worked over the past 20 years.

Photo of school buses parked in a parking lot.
Flickr Photo/tncountryfan

Two state representatives want to divide Seattle Public Schools into two smaller districts.

“Seattle public schools is a broken system for many students for many families and something has to change,” said Sharon Tomiko-Santos, a Democrat from South Seattle.

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