Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Firefighters from Salem, Oregon, mop up hotspots on Judy Doran McBride's ranch near Twisp this weekend.
Courtesy Judy Doran McBride

Wildfire was roaring toward their 640-acre ranch near Twisp, but Judy Doran McBride and her husband stood their ground.

“If the fire comes our way, we’re going to stay and defend our home,” McBride told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

Roger Shimomura's "American in Disguise"
Courtesy Tacoma Art Museum

Roger Shimomura wasn't even three years old when he and his family were sent to the Puyallup Assembly Center in 1942. He celebrated his third birthday there.

That's one of his earliest memories.

Join Marcie Sillman and your fellow listeners for KUOW's Front Row Center at Intiman Theatre. Watch "The Children's Hour," then join us for a post-play conversation with Marcie Sillman and producing artistic director Andrew Russell!

This classic play by Lillian Hellman has been re-set in 1980s Seattle by veteran local director Sheila Daniels.

As a friend of KUOW, you will get a 15 percent discount for the September 17 show at 7:30 p.m. Just use promo code KUOW15 when you purchase your ticket online.

We're looking forward to seeing you at Intiman!

Special, important, brilliant: That’s the rave review from Nancy Pearl for this week’s reading pick, and she doesn’t use those words lightly. The book is “The Sympathizer,” by Viet Thanh Nguyen,  an associate professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicities at USC who was born in Vietnam and came to the United States as a refugee in 1975.

His novel follows an unnamed main character from South Vietnam who acts a spy for the North around the end of the war.

Pearl told Marcie Sillman on KUOW’s The Record that it should be on everyone’s must-read list, but it’s not an easy read.

“It is laugh-aloud funny in many places and terrifying and harrowing to read in other places,” she said. “But it took a lot for me to read it. It took a lot of compartmentalizing on my part.”

Former PNB dancer Ariana Lallone at Teatro Zinzanni.
Courtesy of Teatro Zinzanni/Michael Doucett

She may kill me for revealing her age, but what the heck? 

Ariana Lallone is 47 years old, and she’s as striking and vibrant as the first time I saw her dance with Pacific Northwest Ballet 20 years ago.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about this week's reading pick: a new graphic biography of the famous Apple co-founder called "Steve Jobs: Insanely Great," by Jessie Hartland. Pearl says it rivals even Walter Isaacson's "Steve Jobs," which is considered the definitive biography of the tech leader.

Gordon Hirabayashi, a sociology student at the University of Washington, violated curfew set for Japanese Americans in Seattle.
Historylink.org

When Jeanne Sakata was growing up near Watsonville, California, her parents never talked about what happened to them during World War II. Like thousands of other Japanese-Americans on the West Coast, Sakata’s family had been forcibly removed from their home and sent to an armed camp.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about this week's reading recommendation: Rinker Buck's first hand account of recreating in the 21st century the famous treks of the 19th century in, "The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey." Pearl says it's perfect fodder for your next summer road trip.

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phil Talmadge, former Washington state Democratic legislator and former state justice, about the McCleary decision concerning education funding and how it's dividing government. 

Seattle Convention Center.
Flickr Photo/Dave Reid

Marcie Sillman talks with Visit Seattle CEO Tom Norwalk about the convention center expansion and how he believes it will benefit citizens. 

Marcie Sillman talks to Luke Timmerman, founder and editor of the Timmerman Report, about Juno Therapeutics and other biotech startups like Just Biotherapeutics that came out of the closure of Amgen's Seattle offices last year. 

Promotional material for the Seattle Art Fair.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Art Fair

Marcie Silman talks to Jen Graves, visual arts writer for The Stranger, about the inaugural Seattle Art Fair and whether or not it will be good for local art and artists.

Madeline DeFrees in 1967. The poet, formerly a nun, would tuck an envelope and pencil into the deep pockets of her habit to write when she had time.
Lee Nye via MadelineDeFrees.com

Madeline DeFrees published her first poem at the age of 12.

It was called “Sympathy,” written for a Portland newspaper poetry contest.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist with the Vancouver Sun, about the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the tension it has caused between the US and Canada. 

Courtesy of MOHAI/Staff Photographer at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Warning: If you live in Seattle, this might break your heart.

Once upon a time, Seattle was a pioneer in transportation planning.

City officials thought in terms of economic expediency and asked themselves, how could we get our residents around as quickly as possible? Thus, at the beginning of the 20th century, the streetcar system was born.

Pages