Marcie Sillman | KUOW News and Information

Marcie Sillman

Arts and Culture Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focused on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region. After two years as Senior Host of the program, Marcie returned to full-time cultural reporting.

Ways to Connect

Today on The Record we're looking at the #MeToo and Time's Up movements here in Washington state. How did we get here and what we can do next?

Dancer Jon Boogz.
Photo courtesy of Marcie Sillman/marciesillman.com

One of them went viral in a collaboration with Yo Yo Ma; the other played Michael Jackson for the Cirque du Soleil. But you might know dancers Lil Buck and Jon Boogz best for their collaboration on the haunting video Color of Reality.

Christopher Paul Jordan poses for a portrait in front of a wall of spray paint cans on Wednesday, January 17, 2018, at his studio in Tacoma.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

2017 was a banner year for artist Christopher Paul Jordan.

It started with Jordan curating an exhibition of work by African American artists titled "Colored 2017." Mid-summer, Jordan’s temporary installation "Latent Home Zero" was on display at Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park. The  year ended with him winning the prestigious Neddy Award for painting, along with a $25,000 prize.

Raven Healing sings with Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women of Washington group members during the Women's March on Saturday, January 20, 2018, on Pine St., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Tens of thousands of people took to Seattle streets Saturday for the Women's March 2.0. A stream of demonstrators was already heading towards central Seattle at 9 a.m., an hour before the scheduled start.

Jade Solomon Curtis poses for a portrait on Tuesday, January 2, 2018, at Spectrum Dance Theater in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has a rich and diverse arts community, but many people believe the city's African American artists don't get the widespread attention they deserve. 

We asked you for the names of local artists you're excited about; we received more than 80 names. Here are four of those artists.

The Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute is shown on Wednesday, January 3, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The Central Area is the historic heart of Seattle's African-American community.

But many longtime residents have moved away from the neighborhood they once called home.


If the Space Needle can make it through winter, hopefully we can too.
Flickr Photo/Great Beyond (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/5G8RJ7

The winter solstice was this morning at 8:28 a.m. – if you’re reading this, you’re through the darkest point of the year. But we know it may not feel like it. What to do to beat the winter blues in Seattle? Host Marcie Sillman spoke to some experts to help us answer that question.

Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy

Marcie Sillman talks to Anna King, Northwest News Network's Richland correspondent, about the radioactive contamination that was found on six workers and fourteen cars around the Plutonium Finishing Plant in Richland Washington. 

Mayumi Tsutakawa poses for a portrait on Friday, December 1, 2017, at her home in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Mayumi Tsutakawa is the only daughter of an influential arts family in Seattle. Her father was a sculptor, her mother and brothers musicians. During her career as an arts administrator, Tsutakawa focused on advocating for artists and communities of color.

Marcus Tsutakawa, former orchestra director at Seattle's Garfield High School, poses for a portrait with his double bass on Tuesday, November 28, 2017. Marcus is the youngest of George and Ayame Tsutakawa's four children.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Marcus Tsutakawa is the youngest in a family of famous Seattle artists. He found a way to make his own mark on the cultural landscape of the city by molding Garfield High School into a classical music powerhouse.

Deems Tsutakawa, the third of George and Ayame Tsutakawa's four children, plays his grand piano on Tuesday, November 28, 2017, at his home in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Deems Tsutakawa is the third child of a family of legendary Seattle artists. You can still see the fountains his father, George Tsutakawa, installed all over Seattle. But jazz pianist Deems says he was more influenced by his mother, Ayame Tsutakawa. 

Gerry Tsutakawa's Mitt, at the north entrance of Safeco Field
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

If you’re a Seattle Mariners fan, you’ve probably been to Safeco Field. And if you’ve been to the Safe, you’ve probably seen the large bronze sculpture near the north entrance.

It’s a nine-foot baseball glove with a circle cut out of its middle, fittingly titled "The Mitt." The sculpture has become a beloved spot for selfies, family portraits and meet ups.

Benaroya Hall, home of the Seattle Symphony.
Flickr Photo/D Coetzee (Public Domain)/https://flic.kr/p/6uEiXr

Seattle’s lively theater community will lose two of its leaders.

The 5th Avenue Theater said artistic director David Armstrong is stepping down. Meanwhile, the Seattle Symphony has announced that its president and CEO Simon Woods will leave for the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Nellie Cornish, founder of the school that became the Cornish College of the Arts, taken in the 1920s.
Courtesy Cornish College of the Arts

When Nellie Cornish arrived in Seattle in 1900, she was a 24-year-old piano teacher looking to make a living in a city that was more hospitable to Gold Rush prospectors than it was to the fine arts.

The first Boeing airplane, the Bluebill, B&W Model 1, assembled and launched from Seattle's Lake Union
photo courtesy Boeing Historical Archives

On any given weekday morning, thousands of young professionals flood the streets in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood. Their identical black backpacks and swinging lanyards mark them as employees of the global retail behemoth Amazon.

Noelani Pantastico and Lucien Postlewaite in 'Romeo et Juliette' in 2008 at Pacific Northwest Ballet.
Courtesy Pacific Northwest Ballet/Angela Sterling

Lucien Postlewaite remembers exactly how he felt the first time he danced with Noelani Pantastico.

“I was this young boy,” he recalls. “I’d always admired Noe’s dancing. The first time she talked to me I was like, ‘Oh my god!’”

KUOW's Marcie Sillman with book hugger Nancy Pearl.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

KUOW's Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle librarian and author Nancy Pearl about her first novel, "George and Lizzie."

A Public Works Seattle rehearsal
Courtesy Seattle Repertory Theatre/Jim Bennett

Racial and economic equity are priorities for government leaders and community activists in the Pacific Northwest.

The same holds true for regional arts organizations.

Ballard Locks under construction, 1913
FLICKR PHOTO/SEATTLE MUNICIPAL ARCHIVES (CC BY 2.0)/HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/4TIHT9

This story originally aired in 2005. We loved it so much that we dug it out again in honor of the Ballard Locks' 100 year anniversary on July 4, 2017.

Dancers from the Seattle troupe Bailodores de Bronce, in performance
Courtesy Bailodores de Bronces

Adrian Olivas is a small, soft-spoken man who makes his living as a horticulturalist, nurturing plant life of all kinds.

But three evenings a week, Olivas swaps his garden tools for a pair of dancing shoes. That's how he nurtures his soul.


Seattle poet Azura Tyabji has been writing poetry since eighth grade. Her big dream is to publish a book.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When Azura Tyabji stepped up to the microphone at a community forum this spring, most of the audience members had no idea what to expect.

Seven Gabels Theatre in Seattle's University District
Flickr Photo/ javacolleen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/31fDJf

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Sean Nelson, arts and music editor at The Stranger, about the closing of two Landmark movie theaters in Seattle, Guild 45th and Seven Gables Theatre.  

photo by Naomi Ishisaka, courtesy Intiman Theatre

Seattle’s Intiman Theatre has a simple mission: To present work that is relevant to our times and as diverse as the community itself.

Intiman recently hired a Broadway producer to help them achieve that goal.

Philanthropist and co-founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates, right, and his wife Melinda listen to the speech of France's President Francois Hollande, prior to being awarded of the Legion of Honour at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Friday, April 21, 2017. Philant
AP Photo/Kamil Zihnioglu, Pool

Seattle has a rich history of big giving that goes back to the middle of the last century. As a communications officer at the Gates Foundation, Local Wonder listener Anne Martens knows a lot about philanthropy but she wanted to know more about the role giving has played in Seattle's past. We sent KUOW's Marcie Sillman to report the story.

Seattle Symphony violinist Mikhail Shmidt came to the U.S. as a refugee from the former Soviet Union.
Courtesy of Mikhail Shmidt

America has been called a nation of immigrants.

If that’s the case, then Seattle Symphony is a quintessentially American orchestra.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Mayor Ed Murray says he'll propose an income tax on Seattle's highest earners.

That puts him in company with at least one of his challengers for re-election.


A sales tax to fund arts and culture in King County will not go to voters this summer after all.

King County Council member and budget chair Dave Upthegrove has pulled the proposal from consideration by his committee because he believes it is fundamentally inequitable.

Seattle Opera General Director Aidan Lang
Facebook/Seattle Opera

Earlier this month, Seattle Opera general director Aidan Lang met with scene shop manager Michael Moore and dropped a bombshell.


Couresy of Seattle Opera/Rozarii Lynch

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW arts and culture reporter Marcie Sillman about the Seattle Opera's plan to close their scene shop in Renton.

A couple of weeks ago, Seattle Opera announced it was making budget cuts. Among them was closing the opera’s scene shop. It is a custom-made building in Renton where they build the sets.

The opera says it needs to be fiscally responsible to its donors. But whenever you tighten the purse strings, somebody feels the pain. In this instance, it’s the artisans who build the scenery for the opera.

Left: Replica of totem pole carved in early 20th century by Kwakwaka'wakw artist Charlie James in Stanley Park, Vancouver B.C. Right: A track suit produced by Adidas, design adapted from Charlie James' totem pole. Click through for more examples.
Creative Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) and Courtesy Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Burke Museum, University of Washington

The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 makes it illegal to knowingly sell non-Native made goods as authentic Native American art or craft. More than 600 fraud cases have been filed since the law's enactment.

But the IACA doesn't apply to the more widespread practice of borrowing and adapting Native imagery, themes, or traditional cultural expression on a range of commercial products.


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