Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

King County has been working on different recycling products for Loop, aka waste treatment biosolids. One Seattle startup thinks biofuel is the answer.
Screen shot from YouTube/Loop biosolids

A Seattle startup hopes that in the near future, every time you flush your toilet you help power your car.

Vitruvian Energy has developed technology that turns biosolids – the dirt-like material left over once sewage has been treated at a plant and the inert water returned to the watershed – into biofuel. Right now the company is crowdfunding to launch their fuel locally.

It takes about 53 pounds of biosolids to make a gallon of EEB, Vitruvian’s biofuel. The biosolids are run through a series of biological and chemical steps to go from a dirt-like material to a clear liquid that has a sweet smell.

There are organizations pushing for more religious speech – and some demanding less. That’s a product of the country’s ongoing culture wars, but these cases aren’t changing the law – because the role of religious speech in public schools is already clear.
Flickr Photo/Challenge Convention (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Michael Leal, a student at Everett’s Cascade High School, had been suspended three times for passing out Christian literature and preaching on campus. The school worried his activities would offend other students.

New York Police Department officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014 in New York.
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Marcie Sillman talks with Vievu CEO Steve Ward, who is also a former SWAT officer with the Seattle police, about his company's body cameras that have been implemented by 4,000 police agencies nationwide. This week, President Barack Obama set aside $75 million for police agencies to purchase body cameras.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Wendy (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Ivan Moreno, reporter for the Associated Press in Colorado, about the how their universal background check law went into effect last year. Washington state's passed a similar law in November.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Lis Ferla (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Joel Beckerman about his new book, "The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel And Buy," and about his work as a composer and sound designer.

The people behind "Now I'm Fine," a performance that melds music, comedy and storytelling at On The Boards this week.
On The Boards

It was 2006, and Ahamlefule J. Oluo was not fine. 

"I was very young, in my early 20s," he says. "I had just gone through a divorce." 

His Nigerian father, a man he'd never met and only spoken with once on the telephone, had died before Oluo got to fulfill his wish of forging a relationship with him.

Flickr Photo/xxxtoff (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the return of Avian flu to British Columbia. They also discuss the legal battles of anti-oil pipeline demonstrators.
Inside the Harvard Exit movie theater, which will be closing in January 2015.
Flickr Photo/Andi Szilagyi

Marcie Sillman talks to Lyall Bush, executive director of the Northwest Film Forum, about the cultural legacy of the Harvard Exit Theater and what it's closing means for this area.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-King County NAACP President Gerald Hankerson about police reform in Seattle in the wake recent events in Ferguson, Missouri. 

The Reverend Jesse Jackson speaks with KUOW's Marcie Sillman about tech industry diversity on the University of Washington campus on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The Reverend Jesse Jackson was scheduled to demonstrate this morning in front of Amazon headquarters in downtown Seattle.

Members of the Service Employees International Union rallied there in a show of support for efforts to unionize Amazon's security workers.

Jackson and his Rainbow PUSH Coalition have challenged tech firms around the country to release data on their employee demographics.

Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo
Courtesy Seattle Archdiocese, file

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, chair of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' migration committee, about the Roman Catholic Church's push for immigration reform. 

Seattle Public Schools superintendent Larry Nyland.
Courtesy of Seattle Public Schools

The Seattle School Board has delayed a vote on whether to permanently hire Interim Superintendent Larry Nyland.

The vote was scheduled at a meeting Wednesday without any public announcement.

That’s in contrast to the board’s usual process when hiring a superintendent: a months-long national search followed by numerous community meetings with the candidates.

Last night Board President Sharon Peaslee moved to delay the vote by a week to December 10 in order to get more community input.

Conjoined skulls? The digestive tract of a jellyfish? Museums can feature some weird displays.
Flickr Photo/Rooney Wimms (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Victoria Cain, author of the book "Life On Display: Revolutionizing Museums Of Science And Natural History In The United States," about the relationships museums have had with odd and bizarre artifacts.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman gets a recommendation from gifted librarian Nancy Pearl for a book to help those seeking a little relief from the holiday bustle: "2 A.M. at The Cat's Pajamas," by Marie-Helene Bertino.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jon Scholes, chief executive officer of the Downtown Seattle Association, about how local businesses are reacting to continued post-Ferguson protests in Seattle.

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