Marcie Sillman

Arts and Culture Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focused on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region. After two years as Senior Host of the program, Marcie returned to full-time cultural reporting.

Ways to Connect

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

When book-loving KUOW listeners are at a loss for what to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the call is to "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Nancy and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a listener in Clinton, Washington who loved the "The Bone Tree" by Greg Iles. 

Nancy's picks include: "Time's Witness" and "Uncivil Seasons" by Michael Malone, "Black Water Rising" and "Pleasantville" by Attica Locke, and Angela Flournoy's debut novel, "The Turner House."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll patch you through to Seattle's favorite librarian to see if she can guide you to your next book.

Donald Byrd, choreographer for Spectrum Dance Theater, is demanding a more frank dialogue about race.
Spectrum Dance Theater/Ian Douglas

Spectrum Dance Theater’s Donald Byrd wants to shake up the conversations about race in this country.

“People are cautious,” says Byrd, a choreographer. “Given the times we live in, we can’t be cautious.”

Washington state's fourth poet laureate Tod Marshall.
Gonzaga University

If you want to be Washington State’s poet laureate, you have to apply for the job, the same way you’d apply to be a teacher or a bookkeeper.

Nancy Pearl said you'll learn more than you ever thought possible about mules from this week's reading picks.
Flickr Photo/Greg Westfall (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sS617i

When KUOW listeners are at a loss for what book to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the person picking up the phone is "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Pearl and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a history buff in Seabeck, Washington who loved Bernard DeVoto's "The Journals of Lewis and Clark."

Pearl recommends "The Oregon Trail" by Rinker Buck and another title by DeVoto, "Across the Wide Missouri."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll see if Seattle's favorite librarian can guide you to your next book.

Mermaid
Flickr Photo/AK Rockefeller (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/20rsa5l

When KUOW listeners are at a loss for what book to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the person picking up the phone is "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Pearl and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a listener in Friday Harbor follow up on Majia Comella's "The Bay of Mermaids."

Pearl recommends Sarah Addison Allen's "Garden Spells" and "City of Bones" by Cassandra Clare, plus a little Alice Hoffman for good measure.

The outside of the Francia Russell Center in Bellevue. The Francia Russell Center is part of Pacific Northwest Ballet and will soon have to move because it is in the light rail pathway.
Google Maps

UPDATE: On Monday, Jan. 25, King County Superior Court Judge Theresa Doyle ruled against Pacific Northwest Ballet. The judge said Sound Transit may use fair market value for PNB’s eastside school, rather than the replacement value of the facility. The ruling only determines the method of assessment for the property value. A jury may still place a higher value on the school. A court hearing on the issue is set for June.

Pacific Northwest Ballet has performed in a lot of places.

But Friday the dance company will be on a new stage: a King County Superior Court room.

PNB wants a judge to settle a dispute with Sound Transit.

'Inopportune: Stage One' by Chinese contemporary artist Cai Guo-Qiang is leaving Seattle Art Museum's lobby soon.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

For the past eight years, visitors to the downtown Seattle Art Museum have been greeted by nine white Ford Taurus cars that hang from the ceiling of SAM’s expansive main lobby.

“I noticed them before I even walked into the building,” says Zach, a visitor from Maryland. “It’s like cars are exploding, right?”

Elizabeth Austen, Washington state's outgoing poet laureate.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Elizabeth Austen hadn't given much thought to the state poet laureate job until a few years ago.

That changed after several friends urged Austen, a poet and KUOW's literary producer, to seek the post. She found out quickly she could make the position her own.

Jonathan Porretta was the only boy in his dance class in Totowa, New Jersey. Dance was his refuge, where he could shine. He ended up at School of American Ballet in New York City, where he was scouted by Kent Stowell of Pacific Northwest Ballet.
Courtesy Jane D'Annunzio

A dancer stands alone on the stage. He is dressed in black tights only; his bare chest is broad and muscular.

As the bassoonist plays the first plaintive notes of Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” the lights come up and the dancer’s body undulates like a stalk of wheat in the wind. Slowly, he lifts his shoulders, and his extended arms drift up like wings of a bird.

Tod Marshall is Washington state's new poet laureate.
Amy Sinisterra Photography

Washington state has a new poet laureate: Tod Marshall, a professor and writer at Gonzaga University.

Marshall is the first in his family to attend college. He says that experience inspired him to try to use culture – poetry in particular – to build bridges between academia and the wider community.

Courtesy ACT Theatre

Ayad Akhtar is one of those guys you'd hate if he wasn't so likeable.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright is an award-winning screenwriter, a critically-acclaimed novelist, an actor and a teacher. And he's only 43 years old.

High Voltage Music co-owner Chris Lomba in his backyard shop in north Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

When Chris Lomba and his partners decided to open a music repair shop, they chose a storefront near the corner of Pike and Broadway on the edge of Seattle's Pike/Pine corridor.

"I've always liked the neighborhood," says Lomba. "Throw a rock and you're gonna hit a musician!"

Jeff Coats kidnapped David Grenier and stole his car in Tacoma, Washington on September 6, 1994. Coats was 14 years old, and was sent to adult prison. Now, Coats is a successful real estate agent who speaks on issues of imprisonment and rehabilitation.
Provided courtesy of Katherine Beckett, University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington sociology professor Katherine Beckett about the story of Jeff Coats who, along with two 17-year-old friends, robbed and kidnapped Tacoma resident David Grenier on Sept. 6, 1994. Beckett helped produce a full-length audio documentary about Coats, who she believes has rehabilitated himself.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman speaks with book maven Nancy Pearl about her pick for a new science-fiction novel to transport you out of the dark Pacific Northwest December: "City of Stairs," by Robert Jackson Bennett.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about this week's reading recommendation: "Crooked Heart" by Lissa Evans, which Pearl says is every bit as good as the cover design promises it will be.

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