Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Hobson’s radical philosophy was born when he met a 24-year-old woman who was schizophrenic, HIV positive and addicted to crack. And she was pregnant.

It was early in Hobson’s 31-year tenure at the Downtown Emergency Services Center.

Moises Castro, Reginald André Jackson, and Riley Shanahan in an Intiman workshop of 'John Baxter Is a Switch Hitter'  at the Intiman.
Photo by Jeff Carpenter

  Intiman Theatre’s Andrew Russell remembers exactly how he felt in 2011, when the venerable Seattle company shut its doors in the middle of an artistic season.

“Well, heartbreak. Absolutely heartbreak,” he says. “And confusion and anxiety and all of those things that happen when the human body faces something that’s unexpected.”

Marcie Sillman speaks with technology journalist Todd Bishop about a leaked company-wide Microsoft memo that signals a new culture and direction for the company after a year of new CEO Satya Nadella's leadership.

Staying cool in the International Fountain at Seattle Center is one way to beat the heat.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, health officer at Seattle King County Public Health, about heat illness and how to stay safe when temperatures soar.

Photo by Sølve Sundsbø

Locals share their thoughts about the visit by King Harald of Norway with Producer Posey Gruener. Also, Marcie Sillman interviews Christine Ingebritsen, a Professor in the Department of Scandinavian Studies at the University of Washington, about the backstory on the Norwegian Monarchy (and the proper way to toast a king). 

Hannah Webb, a resident of Seattle's Tent City 3 in Feb. 2015.on the campus of Seattle Pacific University
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sola Plumacher of Seattle's Human Services Department about the city's three new proposed sites for city-sponsored tent cities.

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about a Scottish mystery novel that's finally available in the U.S. called "Strange Loyalties," by William McIlvanney.

Smoke from several warehouses on fire, thought to have been sparked by embers from a wildfire that hit homes on a nearby hillside, fills the sky Monday, June 29, 2015, in Wenatchee, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Fire came floating out of the sky into Wenatchee.

“Some of the embers we gathered and posted on social media, I mean, they're the size of a loaf of bread or bigger,” Wenatchee World editor Cal FitzSimmons told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman, describing the scene this week as a wildfire roared down from the northwest.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Bradford, an early participant in Seattle's Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Program, about his journey from a homeless addict to a small business owner.

drugs pills health
iStock

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington pain specialist Jane Ballantyne about evolving attitudes towards prescription opiates. 

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the budget deal and whether or not we'll avoid a state shutdown.

Dan Savage and husband Terry Miller are seen in a 2011 photo.
Flickr photo/Chris Tse (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's Dan Savage about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling giving same-sex couples across the United States the right to marry. 

Justice Mary Yu, at the Washington State Supreme Court's Temple of Justice.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman speaks with state Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about her reaction to the legalization of same-sex marriage across the U.S. Yu presided over the first same-sex marriage in King County after statewide legalization in 2012. 

Leija Farr, Seattle's new youth poet laureate, calls poetry a form of "self-healing."
KUOW photo/RadioActive staff

Seattleites love their poetry. The city is home to one of the nation's few poetry-only bookstores, Open Books, in the Wallingford neighborhood.

The Washington state poet laureate, Elizabeth Austen, is a Seattle resident. And the city recently decided to create a Seattle poet laureate position.

Kimberly Rodriguez, a new recruit for the Seattle Police Department, on her first day at the police academy. That class of 30 recruits included eight women, which was unusual. Most classes have between one and five female recruits.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The Seattle Police Department’s initiative to put body cameras on all its officers isn’t a simple matter of just buying some hardware and software.

First, says Mike Wagers, the department’s chief operating officer, that’s about 650 cameras. And those cameras will be generating terabytes of video, he told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

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