Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready with Seattle Symphony Music Director Ludovic Morlot.
Courtesy Seattle Symphony Orchestra

Mike McCready, the lead guitarist for Pearl Jam, gave his first performance for the Seattle Symphony when he was just a kid.

"I was 12 years old," he says laughing, "and my band Warrior played a Symphony fund-a-thon underneath the Monorail."

Now McCready gets a chance to make music with the orchestra.

Ms. Marvel designs by Adrian Alphona. Ms. Marvel, described by writer G. Willow Wilson as "kind of a hipster," is the second from the left.
Marvel Comics

G. Willow Wilson’s origin story, in a matter of speaking, started in New Jersey on about 3 acres of land surrounded by old-growth woods, where her parents raised rabbits and chickens and grew corn, blackberries and sweet potatoes.

Marcie Sillman talks to local author Garth Stein about his latest novel "A Sudden Light." Set in a historic estate in Seattle, the novel follows the Riddell family's past and present.   

This story originally aired October 1, 2014.

Courtesy Jason Yeatman

Two years ago Jason Yeatman, a researcher at the University of Washington, stumbled into a secret corridor of the mind.

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about one of the legislature's priorities this session: mental health. 

Courtesy of Seattle City Council

Marcie Sillman talks with news analyst and KCTS contributor Joni Balter about the upcoming departure of two longtime City Council members and what that means for the future of Seattle. 

Dragon, SpaceX's version of an astronaut taxi to the International Space Station. The company announced it would be opening up a new office in Seattle for 1,000 employees.  Boeing is also getting in the space technology game with a rival spacecraft.
Wikipedia Photo/NASA

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about the new frontiers of space technology and what that industry will mean for Seattle. 

This group of REI employees met at a Starbucks for bike-to-work day. Is there anything more Northwest than that?
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Colman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Knute Berger, writer at Crosscut and Seattle Magazine, about what makes us "of the Northwest" and the history of how we got here.

lelavision
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When Ela Lamblin was a little boy in Oregon, his father said he wouldn't buy him any toys. Instead, Lamblin's father offered to help Ela build anything he wanted.

Fast forward several decades. Ela Lamblin still builds things at his Vashon Island studio. He and his wife, Leah Mann, landed in the Seattle area more than 20 years ago after they finished art degrees in Atlanta.

Lamblin is a sculptor, but his artwork doesn't just sit there. Most of Lamblin's creations move. And they can be played like musical instruments.

Seagull Project company members in Uzbekistan.
Courtesy of the Seagull Project

When a Seattle theater troupe decided to make the long journey to Tashkent, Uzbekistan last spring, the artists had no idea what was in store for them.

"We had meetings with the American embassy that helped us get over there," says director John Langs.

"They basically said don't do anything or say anything in your hotel room that you wouldn't want your grandmother to hear or see, because you will be bugged."

Author Andrew Keen.
Flickr Photo/SHARE Conference (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to author Andrew Keen about his new book, "The Internet Is Not The Answer." 

Karel Cruz, principal dancer at the Pacific Northwest Ballet, ended up in Seattle after being rejected by the Cuban National Ballet for being too tall.
Pacific Northwest Ballet Photo/Angela Sterling

Seattle ballet dancer Karel Cruz remembers exactly how he felt when President Barack Obama announced that the U.S. would begin to mend its relations with Cuba.

"It’s one of those things you don't think is ever going to happen," he says. He shakes his head, still a little overwhelmed. "You look to the sun and say, ‘Is this happening right now?’"

Cruz, 36, lives in Seattle now, but he was born in Holguin, Cuba.  His family moved across the island to the town of Pinar del Rio when he was 8-years-old.

Elephants at Addo Elephant Park in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Flickr Photo/Clive Reid (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington biology professor Samuel Wasser about how his lab uses elephant DNA to pinpoint where large ivory poaching operations happen in Africa. Representative Eric Pettigrew has sponsored a bill in the Washington state House of Representatives that would ban ivory in the state.

Atlantic coast ocean jersey shore
Flickr Photo/Nathan Siemers (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with beloved librarian Nancy Pearl about the book pick of the week by Canadian writer Emma Hooper, a first-time novelist. Called "Etta and Otto and Russell and James," it is about a middle-aged woman who decides to walk from her home on Canada's Great Plains all the way to the Atlantic coast.

A protester of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, holds up a sign reading "No justice, no peace" -- a popular slogan.
Flickr Photo/Shawn Semmler (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with language journalist Ben Zimmer about the varied interpretations of the popular protest slogan, "No justice, no peace."

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